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FULLY (SIC) | August 27, 2014 | EDUCATION | 2 |

Who will teach our* languages?

More and more Australians are embracing the idea that our first languages should be taught in schools. Faced with high levels of language endangerment and loss, everyone’s hoping for a quick fix. John Hobson takes a look at what works and what doesn’t. The conclusion: it’s a complex matter. Language teaching requires not only time and hard work but, most of all, well-trained teachers.

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LOCHLAN MORRISSEY | May 15, 2014 | POLITICS | 57 |

Did C-Pyne drop the c-bomb?

Earlier today a number of news agencies (perhaps all of them, ever) reported on a video, in which Education Minister Christopher Pyne appears to call Manager of Opposition Business Tony Burke the c-bomb after Burke interrupted his speech. Here’s a video of the incident: The minister’s office quickly came out and stated that Pyne had [...]

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LOCHLAN MORRISSEY | May 13, 2014 | AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH | 5 |

No, Baden Eunson, English is not vunerable in Straya

It’s that old conservative chestnut. We’ve lost our way. We’re falling into an amoral, amorphous, or—in the case of linguistic conservatism—ungrammatical purgatory. But fear not! Redemption is at hand! Just some simple alterations to your accent, to reflect centuries-outdated pronunciation preserved in an obscure, inefficient orthography, and you’ll be saved! It’s this style of peevology [...]

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FULLY (SIC) | April 28, 2014 | AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH | 8 |

Grammar pedantry across the generations

People often bemoan that kids these days aren’t being taught grammar. Allie Severin writes about her research, and shows that young people are just as discerning, they just notice different things.

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PIERS KELLY | April 24, 2014 | LANGUAGE AND THE LAW | |

Ballot papers by the balls

The strange rites that go on behind closed doors at the AEC.

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WAMUT | April 16, 2014 | EDUCATION | |

Graffiti in Kriol: what one Ngukurr resident thinks of Scullion’s attendance minions

In Ngukurr this week, Greg Dickson discovered that not everyone is impressed by Nigel Scullion’s $46 million Remote School Attendance Strategy. Either that or it’s just good fun to get out there and write some graffiti in Kriol.

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LOCHLAN MORRISSEY | January 31, 2014 | POLITICS | 3 |

Let’s call a cull, a cull

As the unpopular shark bait and shoot program continues in Western Australia, fisheries minister Troy Buswell has defended the policy, saying that it isn’t a cull, but a ‘localised shark mitigation strategy’. Lochlan Morrissey suspects Buswell learned the art of political euphemism from the best.

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PIERS KELLY | December 06, 2013 | LANGUAGE POLICY | 9 |

What’s in a name? For the Timorese, quite a lot

Gordon Peake and Piers Kelly write:

With allegations  of Australian chicanery during the Timor Sea negotiations, a definitional dilemma emerges for the media: just what is the correct name of our northern neighbor?  Is it East Timor or Timor-Leste? The ABC and the Guardian seem to working off different style guides on the question. In the main, journos tends to use the former with talking heads more frequently opting for the latter.

The ‘-Leste’ part is a Portuguese-derived term meaning ‘East’ and its position after the word ‘Timor’ is consistent with the rules of both Portuguese and the national language Tetun. Why then, is it becoming habitual to use this term in English-language contexts? After all, we tend not to talk about going on holidays to Italia or Deutschland for which well-established and better-understood English counterparts are available.

It turns out that there are good reasons for this.

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PIERS KELLY | November 16, 2013 | UNCATEGORIZED | 1 |

Word of the year?

It’s been a helluva year so far. Three prime ministers, devastating bushfires, Clive Palmer. The Australian National Dictionary Centre wants help from the public to decide on a Word of the Year for 2013. It doesn’t need to have been coined in Australia and it doesn’t even need to be new. What they’re looking for [...]

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WAMUT | October 31, 2013 | EDUCATION | 3 |

How cuts to the NT Education Department could widen the gap

First, they rejected Gonski because too much funding would go to remote community schools. Now, the NT Education department is cutting positions that are key in supporting Aboriginal students who don’t speak English at home. Greg Dickson demonstrates the benefit that such support positions can bring and argues that the NT Government’s handling of education could easily cause the much-discussed “gap” to widen rather than narrow.

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