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The Territory’s greatest living artist gets his day in Court

“I’m allowed to be here. I’m a fucking poet. I’m a poet. You cunts, I’m a fucking poet. Police brutality. I’m allowed to be here”: Trevor Jenkins, Darwin Literary Awards, May 2014.

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‘Nigger Hunts’ in the never never. The battles for land and water on the Roper River, 1870-1945.

“Until the long arm of the law interfered, white men killed the black fellow because they were hungry with a hunger that must be fed with gold, having been trained in a school that for generations has acknowledged ‘Thou shalt not kill’ among its commandments.” Jeannie Gunn, We of the Never Never, 1908.

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NT juvenile justice: “a blight on the entire Australian legal system”

The debacle that has been exposed in the past two years within the NT juvenile justice system shows quite clearly that by deliberate design and policy Aboriginal children in are treated in a barbarous, inhumane and illegal way. Multiple incidents within the juvenile detention facilities have revealed that the NT Government prosecutes policies against Aboriginal children which include spit-hooding, gassing, hand cuffing, shackling and extensive periods of unlawful solitary confinement.

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Why Malheur NWR matters and “armed, out of state militia groups” don’t

The occupation of Malheur by armed, out of state militia groups puts one of America’s most important wildlife refuges at risk. It violates the most basic principles of the Public Trust Doctrine and holds hostage public lands and public resources to serve the very narrow political agenda of the occupiers. The occupiers have used the flimsiest of pretexts to justify their actions.

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Daniel’s Law – a bad law gone for good

“Mr Deputy Speaker … I seek leave to withdraw Daniel’s Law from the Notice Paper.“ With those few words in the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory on the first day of December 2015, NT Attorney-General John Elferink rang the death knell for “Daniel’s Law,” more properly the Sex Offender and Child Homicide Offender Public Website (Daniel’s […]

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NAAJA v NT in the High Court: a wider perspective

It is clearly time for the NT government to revisit its policies for dealing with intoxicated persons. It should abandon the ill-considered “paperless arrest” process and instead look at building new sobering-up shelters in or adjacent to CBD areas. That would allow vulnerable intoxicated people to be taken by police to a supportive, treatment-oriented facility instead of police cells, while still getting police units back out on patrol without delay.

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Ten reasons the NT’s “Daniel’s Law” will be bad for sexual assault victims

“The decision to report a family member suspected of child sexual offending to the authorities is often agonising, and much such offending currently goes unreported. The prospect that the offender – and by extension the offender’s family – will be publicly shamed, will be a powerful deterrent to families considering reporting one of their members as an offender.”

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The NT’s Paperless Arrest Mess

“We can’t arrest ourselves out of this mess”: former NT Police Association President Vince Kelly.

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“Journalist lunatics” – 1; Travel agent – 1 in NT Supreme Court suppression standoff

“There should be no further publication of photographs of the defendant showing her in handcuffs or being placed in the back of a paddy wagon. There should be no suggestions that the defendant is the centrepiece of a web of deception or anything like that. There should be no reference to other suggestions of a scandalous kind and in particular as to the defendant’s relationship with the former Police Commissioner, ministers or former ministers of the Crown or their staffers.” Acting Justice Dean Mildren, The Queen v Kamitsis [2015] NTSC 48.

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Is the NT’s paperless arrest scheme a new “hallmark of tyranny”?

Kumanjayi Langdon, a sick, middle-aged Aboriginal man, was treated like a criminal and incarcerated like a criminal; he died in a police cell which was built to house criminals … he was always likely to die suddenly due to chronic and serious heart disease, but he was entitled to die as a free man.

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