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That incessant noise ... King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard. From Darwin to the Billboard charts

That incessant noise ... King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard. From Darwin to the Billboard charts

Bob GosfordMay 16, 2016

Our son's band, King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard--named in a fit of fun when they were all playing in other bands and thought they'd be getting together only once to play a friend's party--are in the middle of their fifth US tour.

In Deus ex Dynamita. A Kalymnian Easter in Darwin

In Deus ex Dynamita. A Kalymnian Easter in Darwin

Bob GosfordMay 3, 2016

In Darwin, the Kalymnian dynamite ritual signifies the collective will of a small people defying the global trend towards homogenisation and celebrating their collective individuality with a bang, not a whimper.

Nganana tatintja wiya - why nobody should be climbing Uluru*

Nganana tatintja wiya - why nobody should be climbing Uluru*

Bob GosfordApr 20, 20161 Comment

Ask a Red Centre tour guide - you can’t tell Australians anything. During school holidays we would always get a lot of school trips; of the ones I guided 100% of students climbed up Uluru along with most of their teachers. Many had decided even before they departed school grounds that it would be the crowning achievement of the trip.

Camp Dogs of the Week: AMRRIC's Kalumburu Vet and Education Program needs your doggy donations

Camp Dogs of the Week: AMRRIC's Kalumburu Vet and Education Program needs your doggy donations

Bob GosfordApr 14, 2016

Veterinary programs improve the health of dogs, so that they are less prone to parasites and have better body condition. Desexed animals live longer and healthier lives. Through surgical desexing, we prevent unwanted puppies; fewer dogs means less competition for food.

Broken English: Best Heavy Metal Band in the Country

Broken English: Best Heavy Metal Band in the Country

Bob GosfordFeb 23, 2016

"We don’t do that shit ... we just play rock and roll." Vale Mr Thompson

Bob GosfordFeb 23, 2016

What was it about a style of music which migrated from the Delta to the South Side of Chicago and beyond in the forties and fifties, that enabled it to capture the hearts and minds of young men in locations as disparate as Canvey Island and Ngukurr throughout the rest of the century?

Ten questions for Robbo aka @BiteTheDust

Ten questions for Robbo aka @BiteTheDust

Bob GosfordFeb 16, 2016

In September 2015, Robbo was named the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia Pharmacist of the Year for 2015. Robbo has worked for the last ten years as a remote pharmacist in the vast Ngaanyatjarra Lands of Western Australia adjoining the NT and South Australian borders and is a tireless advocate for improvements in Aboriginal health.

David Bowie and all the young Darwin dudes, summer 1972

David Bowie and all the young Darwin dudes, summer 1972

Bob GosfordJan 13, 20161 Comment

Back in Darwin during Christmas holidays 1972 my friend Fred McCue had returned from London holidays with his family early and we hung around in the blessed aircon and smoked pot. On the first morning back from London he walked out of his bedroom and threw some albums on the table. “These are big in London,” he said. They were Ziggy Stardust, Hunky Dory, Man Who Sold the World and Space Oddity

First look: The Wanarn Painters of Place and Time: Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa

First look: The Wanarn Painters of Place and Time: Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa

Bob GosfordJan 9, 2016

This exquisite art book contains the precious story and transformative work of celebrated artists now living in an aged care facility in Ngaanyatjarra country, a remote and isolated community that is the centre of their abundant world amongst ancient Dreamings.

Strider's Almanac, Vol. 1, Pt 2: How the growing season began in late 2012

Strider's Almanac, Vol. 1, Pt 2: How the growing season began in late 2012

Bob GosfordDec 20, 2015

Depending upon the thickness of the leaf litter layer, and the rate at which the rain falls, anything between the first 3 to 12 mm of a rainfall will be completely absorbed by the leaf litter and hardly a drop will find its way through to the soil beneath it. For this reason we can discount all of the cases or drops of rain and traces in the gauge as fairly irrelevant to what is going on in the soil.