tip off
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

A waterspout for Christmas …

A waterspout off Darwin, December 2014. Waterspouts can be dangerous for boaters and shoreline locations but are no threat farther inland since they collapse soon after they move onshore.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

A Territory Testamentary Tale

The takeaway message from this Territory Testamentary Tale is a simple one. Making a valid will isn’t as straightforward as it might look. You certainly shouldn’t draw it up yourself nor should you get a non-lawyer friend to do so. Using one of those DIY wills kits that you can buy at a newsagent is probably okay in a straightforward situation, as long as you are capable of reading and carefully following the instructions.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

“Kabindi-kebdjirrkkan kurebeh kondabeh” – understanding Township Leasing in the NT

Any rights they would have previously enjoyed under the Land Rights Act to “free, prior and informed consent” about sub-leases would no longer apply. “Bolkkime ngarri-bekkan manekke kun-wok!”-“That’s the first time we have heard/understood this information.”

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

Getting the names right. Adventures with sand goanna nomenclature in central Australia

For Kaytetye speakers, the main difference between their ethnospecies is size and frequency: arlewatyerre is smaller and common while aremaye is big and less common – five of the former and one of the latter were obtained on this day.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

The NT’s “Daniel’s Law” – Alarmed But Not Alert

Make no mistake: on this issue, the Northern Territory Attorney-General has defied the collective wisdom of his fellow Attorneys of every political persuasion, in every other Australian jurisdiction.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

“That old maluka” – Warren Snowdon on the passing of a great man

I have today received a message from the Gurindji: ‘Very sad we lost that old man, but good because now people all over Australia will be reminded of his great legacy and the great thing he did with our leader, Mr Lingiari. That old maluka’—old man—’understood our important role in land rights. We will meet today to plan how we will mourn him.’

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

Marion Scrymgour on Stronger Futures and Constitutional reform

And so to the here and now. In 2014 we again have a coalition government in Canberra. The self-proclaimed ‘Prime Minister for Indigenous Affairs’ has emphasised his commitment to fixing up the constitution so that Indigenous people have a proper place in it, and in the nation.
I’m not a constitutional lawyer, and there are aspects of the recent constitutional reform debate which have struck me as somewhat arcane.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

Scrymgour on the NT Intervention – rivers of grog and acres of leases

The term ‘rivers of grog’ was seized upon by the media and Mr Brough. Unfortunately, the impression that seems to have taken hold down south was that the place where the rivers of grog were flowing was in remote Aboriginal communities.The intended outcome of the leasing program was the more-or-less permanent Commonwealth takeover of Aboriginal community land.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

Marion Scrymgour: The NT Intervention disinformation campaign – from allegations of child sexual abuse to moral panic

Child sex abuse is only one aspect of child protection. General child neglect and associated social dysfunction was the underlying problem which could have, and should have been focussed on by Mr Howard and Mr Brough. By using paedophilia as the emotive hook for their PR campaign, they indiscriminately and irresponsibly labelled the male population in remote Territory communities as predators of the worst kind. That was the second, again almost immediate, negative impact of the Intervention declaration.

READ MORE
SOME PLACES I'VE BEEN |

Marion Scrymgour. From Elliott, Robinson River, the Tiwi Islands and beyond: “Recognise” that blackfellas have survived.

Despite poverty and marginalisation, there was a spirit of defiance and pride amongst the Elliott mob. The slogan from the previous year’s anti-bicentennial – ‘we have survived’ – had continuing resonance. There was respect for the endurance and fortitude of the many former stockmen who lived in the town. Through their skill and discipline they had earned a limited degree of autonomy, despite working for white bosses, and they had managed to maintain culture and ceremony under difficult conditions.

READ MORE

Womens Agenda

loading...

Smart Company

loading...

StartupSmart

loading...

Property Observer

loading...