tip off
THE ARTS |

David Bowie and all the young Darwin dudes, summer 1972

Back in Darwin during Christmas holidays 1972 my friend Fred McCue had returned from London holidays with his family early and we hung around in the blessed aircon and smoked pot. On the first morning back from London he walked out of his bedroom and threw some albums on the table. “These are big in London,” he said. They were Ziggy Stardust, Hunky Dory, Man Who Sold the World and Space Oddity

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THE ARTS |

First look: The Wanarn Painters of Place and Time: Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa

This exquisite art book contains the precious story and transformative work of celebrated artists now living in an aged care facility in Ngaanyatjarra country, a remote and isolated community that is the centre of their abundant world amongst ancient Dreamings.

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THE ARTS |

Obituary: John Stubbs, 1938 – 2015. Journalist

John was born in Cunnamulla on the Warrego River in Far West Queensland on 2 February 1938. His father was a respected lawyer and his mother, who died when he was just 15, was the matron at the local hospital. John was a proud son of Cunnamulla, a gifted boxer, a crack shot, a runner-up in his weight division in the Queensland junior boxing titles and the best marksman in his national service intake year.

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THE ARTS |

Vale Helen Ester. 3 December 1944 to 31 October 2015

Helen Ester led by example, her belief in social justice and equal rights for all people never wavering while she kept kicking against the pricks to the very end. Her affiliations were with those consigned to the margins: working-class men and women, immigrants and refugees, and especially Indigenous peoples, who she considered her greatest educators and mentors. We champion you now, Vale Helen.

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THE ARTS |

Vale Mr Illaga

Mr Illaga was been a respected and well-sought after painter since the late 1980s. He has held many solo and group exhibitions since that time and his work is held in many prominent museums and public collections, including at least nine works held by the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

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THE ARTS |

Art, law and environment: saving the NT EDO, one artwork at a time.

NT EDO principal lawyer David Morris on local support for the auction: “It’s been an incredible outpouring. Particularly, I’m astounded at the response by places where we haven’t worked that have heard about this and have said, we want to support this because there’s a real potential that our community might need this service in the future.”

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THE ARTS |

Lives of the Artist: Patrick Tjungurrayi by John Carty

Patrick Tjungurrayi: Beyond Borders is a worthy addition to the library of anyone interested in Indigenous art, the history of Western Australia, medical and social issues affecting Indigenous people, and the anthropology of the Western Desert. That’s a lot to claim for a mere 125 pages, but thanks to John Carty’s insight and skill, it’s a claim well justified. It’s a consistently surprising and informative read, and a sheer visual delight, both as documentary and as fine art.

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THE ARTS |

Roadside memorials of southern California II: the deadly curves of Route 33

Few people drive Highway 33; even fewer make the run from end to end. Highway 1, dancing along the coast, offers better scenery, and Interstate 5, a more-or-less parallel route, greater speed and efficiency. No, this is a workaday road, a highway for short-haul truckers and agricultural sales reps, for convoys of harvesters, vans shuttling prisoners and even the occasional lone tractor.

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THE ARTS |

Djambawa Marawili: On Homelands, Art and Caring for Indigenous Knowledge

I urge the government and wider Australia to respect our Indigenous cultural knowledge base as an asset of inestimable value for Australia and the world; for building strong and healthy livelihoods for my peoples; and fostering effective empowered participation in the mainstream.

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THE ARTS |

Broken – the best three-hander you won’t see all year

I left ‘Broken’ thrilled, challenged and horrified all at once. You couldn’t hope for much more on a night out in Darwin–unless you pop down to Mitchell Street’s red-light zone on a Friday-fight-night for a pint, a fuck and a punchup.

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