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THE ARTS |

Broken – the best three-hander you won’t see all year

I left ‘Broken’ thrilled, challenged and horrified all at once. You couldn’t hope for much more on a night out in Darwin–unless you pop down to Mitchell Street’s red-light zone on a Friday-fight-night for a pint, a fuck and a punchup.

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THE ARTS |

Getting hot, sweaty and happy at the Rayella Band album launch at Elliott, NT

Mark Raymond is a deserved legend in these parts. He is an ex-copper and lead singer of the great and sadly retired Kulumindini Band, who made three great albums (one with the best title – “You’re Not Useless” – I’ve heard in a while) in the late eighties and mid-nineties. Kulumindini gave us a long “tuning-up-song” intro and then launched into their greatest hits and more. The crowd, as they say, went wild.

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THE ARTS |

Art, land and people. Will Stubbs on why homelands matter

There is a trajectory in Australian political and intellectual thought that is carrying us towards a true national identity and spirit. It is crucial that Yolŋu thought and philosophy continue to exist strongly for that to occur. We need to celebrate Indigenous wisdom in the hope that some of it can rub off

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THE ARTS |

Rayella – angels whisper in my ear and send shivers up my spine

Ear-worm of the week: The song that has been on high rotation in my head for the past two weeks is the first track on Rayella’s eponymous debut album, “Wrong Kind of Man”, a love-gone-so-wrong-but-feels-oh-so-right kind of tale.

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THE ARTS |

My first Crikey piece. “Tony Jones has a big night out in Darwin”

“Lateline and Tony Jones are up for a Walkley Award. Nothing could be more disgraceful in Australian journalism. The fact that this program has been nominated undermines the Walkley Awards … I think it is an absolute disgrace that he is invited here for the media awards on Saturday night.” Syd Stirling, Deputy Chief Minister, NT Legislative Assembly, 19 October 2006.

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THE ARTS |

WARU!! Fire in Australian Aboriginal art

The Gumatj clan language, Dhuwalandja, is itself the tongue of flame. This language, or tongue, like the flame, cuts through all artifice. It incinerates dishonesty leaving only the bones of the truth.

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THE ARTS |

Australia’s bushfire tradition in art

An astonishing roster of major twentieth-century Australian artists painted fires. Arthur Boyd, Fred Williams, Russell Drysdale, Clifton Pugh, even Sidney Nolan – all created major works, often several, on bushfires and burning-off, managing to convey the traditional sense of the bushfire as both implacably Australian and ineffably alien.

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THE ARTS |

A Territory Testamentary Tale

The takeaway message from this Territory Testamentary Tale is a simple one. Making a valid will isn’t as straightforward as it might look. You certainly shouldn’t draw it up yourself nor should you get a non-lawyer friend to do so. Using one of those DIY wills kits that you can buy at a newsagent is probably okay in a straightforward situation, as long as you are capable of reading and carefully following the instructions.

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THE ARTS |

Marion Scrymgour. From Elliott, Robinson River, the Tiwi Islands and beyond: “Recognise” that blackfellas have survived.

Despite poverty and marginalisation, there was a spirit of defiance and pride amongst the Elliott mob. The slogan from the previous year’s anti-bicentennial – ‘we have survived’ – had continuing resonance. There was respect for the endurance and fortitude of the many former stockmen who lived in the town. Through their skill and discipline they had earned a limited degree of autonomy, despite working for white bosses, and they had managed to maintain culture and ceremony under difficult conditions.

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THE ARTS |

“Our organs are sacred”: how we fail Aboriginal Australians with Chronic Kidney Disease

Based on ANZDATA Registry analysis, from 1999 to 2009, the number of people receiving renal replacement therapy—dialysis—from Central Australia more than tripled from 62 to 209. At present, there are some 558 Territorians undergoing dialysis—98% of whom are Aboriginal. Current estimates are that this will grow by 4.5% a year. In simple terms, and all other things being equal, this means over 1,000 Territorian and tri-state Aboriginal people will be “on the machine” in the Territory in 14 years. In Central Australia alone, at worst case by 2020, there will be 479 people under going dialysis.

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