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THE ARTS |

A Territory Testamentary Tale

The takeaway message from this Territory Testamentary Tale is a simple one. Making a valid will isn’t as straightforward as it might look. You certainly shouldn’t draw it up yourself nor should you get a non-lawyer friend to do so. Using one of those DIY wills kits that you can buy at a newsagent is probably okay in a straightforward situation, as long as you are capable of reading and carefully following the instructions.

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THE ARTS |

Marion Scrymgour. From Elliott, Robinson River, the Tiwi Islands and beyond: “Recognise” that blackfellas have survived.

Despite poverty and marginalisation, there was a spirit of defiance and pride amongst the Elliott mob. The slogan from the previous year’s anti-bicentennial – ‘we have survived’ – had continuing resonance. There was respect for the endurance and fortitude of the many former stockmen who lived in the town. Through their skill and discipline they had earned a limited degree of autonomy, despite working for white bosses, and they had managed to maintain culture and ceremony under difficult conditions.

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THE ARTS |

“Our organs are sacred”: how we fail Aboriginal Australians with Chronic Kidney Disease

Based on ANZDATA Registry analysis, from 1999 to 2009, the number of people receiving renal replacement therapy—dialysis—from Central Australia more than tripled from 62 to 209. At present, there are some 558 Territorians undergoing dialysis—98% of whom are Aboriginal. Current estimates are that this will grow by 4.5% a year. In simple terms, and all other things being equal, this means over 1,000 Territorian and tri-state Aboriginal people will be “on the machine” in the Territory in 14 years. In Central Australia alone, at worst case by 2020, there will be 479 people under going dialysis.

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THE ARTS |

Vale Jangala Robertson

Jangala’s childhood memories consist of stories associated with the Coniston massacre of Aboriginal people and the shooting of families at Wantaparri, which is close to his birthplace at Jila. Jangala had virtually no contact with white fellas during his youth but remembers leaving Jila for Mt Theo ‘to hide’ from being shot. After his father died at Mt Theo, Jangala moved with his mother to Mt Doreen Station, and subsequently the new settlement of Yuendumu.

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THE ARTS |

Phonebooths of the remote Northern Territory

These phonebooths provide a place to record thoughts, alliances, wishes and important information. And despite the rise of mobiles and the internet — both enthusiastically adopted in the bush — phonebooths remain an important means of communication for those who’ve run out of credit or can’t afford or can’t access a mobile.

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THE ARTS |

In memory of Eric Brown. A tribute to a life well-lived, by Liam Campbell

Liam Campbell’s loving tribute to his friend Eric Brown. “Eric and Isobel dropped round. Eric is always jovial. I hope he lives a long time yet. The memory of him and Isobel will be with me always.”

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THE ARTS |

Sei isole in un mare di morti. (Six islands in a sea of death)

Chips Mackinolty writes from Palermo on the Sei isole in un mare di morti. The six islands in a sea of death refer to Sicily and Lampedusa, but as well to Christmas Island, Nauru, Manaus and Australia itself.

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THE ARTS |

A call to prayer at the Brunette Downs Campdraft

Bob Gosford travelled to Brunette Downs in the heart of the Northern Territory’s Barkly Tablelands for the 104th ABC Amateur Race Club meeting.

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THE ARTS |

Church of the Week: Christ the King Catholic Church, Tennant Creek NT.

An early morning visit to the Christ The King Church in Tennant Creek.

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THE ARTS |

Melbourne nights walking*

My somewhat cheeky acknowledgement of one of my favourite photography books, Summer Nights Walking, by one of my favourite photographers, Robert Adams.

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Womens Agenda

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Smart Company

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StartupSmart

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Property Observer

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