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Seat of the week: Barker

A conservative rural seat since the dawn of federation, Barker is under new management after Tony Pasin defeated incumbent Patrick Secker for Liberal preselection ahead of the 2013 election.

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Barker encompasses South Australia along the Victorian border from Mount Gambier north to the Riverland and its population centres of Renmark, Loxton, Berri and Waikerie, extending westwards to the mouth of the Murray River and the towns of Angaston and Murray Bridge 75 kilometres to the east of Adelaide. It has existed since South Australia was first divided into single-member electorates in 1903, at all times encompassing the state’s south-eastern corner including Mount Gambier, Bordertown and Keith. From there it has generally extended either westwards to the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island or, as at present, northwards to the Riverland. The former territories were lost when Mayo was created with the expansion of parliament in 1984, but recovered from 1993 to 2004 as Mayo was drawn into Adelaide’s outskirts. The Riverland was accommodated by Angas prior to its abolition in 1977, and by Wakefield from 1993 to 2004. Barker’s present dimensions were established when South Australia’s representation was cut from twelve seats to eleven at the 2004 election, causing Barker to take back the Riverland from a radically redrawn Wakefield, while Mayo recovered the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island.

The areas covered by Barker presently and in the past have long been safe for the conservatives, the Riverland last having had Labor representation when Albert Smith held Wakefield for a term after the 1943 landslide. Barker has never been in Labor hands, nor come close to doing so since territory in southern Adelaide was ceded to the new seat of Kingston in 1949. Archie Cameron held the seat for the Country Party from 1934 to 1940, having been effectively granted it after helping facilitate a merger of the state’s conservative forces as the Liberal Country League while serving as the Country Party’s state parliamentary leader. Cameron succeeded Earle Page as federal parliamentary leader in 1939 but was deposed after the election the following year, causing him to quit the party and align himself with the United Australia Party and then the Liberal Party, which has held Barker ever since. He was succeeded in Barker on his retirement in 1956 by Jim Forbes, who was in turn succeeded in 1975 by James Porter.

Porter was defeated for preselection in 1990 by Ian McLachlan, a former high-profile National Farmers Federation president whom some were touting as a future prime minister. He would instead serve only a single term as a cabinet minister, holding the defence portfolio in the first term of the Howard government, before retiring at the 1998 election. McLachlan’s successor was Patrick Secker, who led a generally low-profile parliamentary career before being unseated for preselection before the 2013 election. Despite endorsement from Tony Abbott and moderate factional powerbroker Christopher Pyne, Secker reportedly lost a local ballot to Mount Gambier lawyer Tony Pasin by 164 votes to 78, with a further 40 recorded for Millicent real estate agent and Wattle Range councillor Ben Treloar. Pasin picked up a 3.5% swing at the election and holds the seat with a margin of 16.5%.

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  • 51
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 8:56 am | Permalink

    Corgi Bernardi lays a red herring trail for the journos and Twitter to follow.

    So what is really happening today that Peta does not want us to notice?

    Keep your eyes peeled, Bludgers.

  • 52
    Yesiree Bob
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 8:57 am | Permalink

    Cori Bernardi is a tit.

  • 53
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 8:58 am | Permalink

    Puff

    Publication of book date was made ages ago. If its used as cover it will be the LNP putting out more trash under its cover.

  • 54
    AussieAchmed
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    oh the hypocricy

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BdNRGi6CEAAHBWu.jpg

  • 55
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:00 am | Permalink

    guytaur
    That is my assessment. There must be something really nasty happening somewhere.

  • 56
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:01 am | Permalink

    News 24 its Albo time!!

  • 57
    Yesiree Bob
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:01 am | Permalink

    Puff, the Magic Dragon.@55

    guytaur
    That is my assessment. There must be something really nasty happening somewhere.

    LNP nasty ?
    No, really ?

  • 58
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:01 am | Permalink

    Cory replies to a question as to whether his views are being listened to in the Coalition.

    Bev - Do you feel your views are well heard within the Coalition?
    Cory - Well, they're certainly heard thanks to shows like the ABC or the media outlets that pick them up but, look, I'm interested in the battle of ideas. The Government will formulate their policy in accordance with their views but I think politicians writing books and discussing issues is really important.

    We-e-ell, perhaps not so much!

  • 59
    AussieAchmed
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:07 am | Permalink

    ACCC call for privatisation of Australia Post and Medibank

  • 60
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:10 am | Permalink

    Psyclaw (from last topic)

    If Labor MPs are “cohorting” why haven’t they been charged under the “cohorting” laws, by the “cohorting” squad?

    Coincidentally, I heard Sean Spencer (a character in a light entertainment program called “psych”) use cohort in almost the same way as “Sean” here just a few days ago. Given that that “Sean” is also uttering someone else’s lines and your nym is psyclaw, the coincidence is amusing. I suspect Psych”s scriptwriter should have used the term “confederate”.

    On a separate note, Zoomster above uses “phenomena” as if it described a singular thing. I’ve heard at least two ostensibly well-educated people in the last couple of days adopt this usage in public discourse. One of them was a lawyer. I can’t but wonder why that is. Perhaps phenomenon is simply too hard to say.

  • 61
    Steve777
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:11 am | Permalink

    Re Guytar @34: The truth is the best and effective measure to reduce abortions is sex education and contraception like condoms.

    True. Although those most vociferous in their opposition to abortion generally oppose these measures as well.

  • 62
    confessions
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:11 am | Permalink

    Almost 110,000 WA families stand to lose the Schoolkids Bonus as the Federal Government this week begins what it hopes will be the last round of payments.

    http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/20614378/axe-hovers-over-school-bonus/

  • 63
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:15 am | Permalink

    Fran

    As a fellow pedant, I have been hearing the transformation of phenomenon (singular) into phenomena (actually the plural but used as a singular) for several years. The funniest is when people carefully use the plural ‘phenomenas’.

  • 64
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:17 am | Permalink

    ‘The problem with the Australian practice of abortion is that an objectively grave matter has been reduced to a question of the mother’s convenience.’

    Even if that were a fair assessment of one woman’s choice I don’t agree that this should bar the choice, or constrain it in any way. FTR I don’t accept that it’s a grave choice. People have surgical procedures for their “convenience” quite regularly. That’s one of the advantages of contemporary life.

  • 65
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:18 am | Permalink

    Senator Bernadi putting abortion on the table can only lose the LNP votes not gain them.

    Senator Bernardi putting abortion on the table was absolutely predicted by Julia Gillard last year… a prediction for which she was mocked by the Opposition, the media group-thinkers and, to their shame, many feminists, who regarded Gillard as encroaching on their franchise to pontificate about what was and what was not part of the Feminist Agenda.

    I particularly remember Eva Cox’s comments…

    The latest speech infuriated Deputy Opposition Leader Julie Bishop, who said Ms Gillard was a “desperate prime minister leading a bitterly divided party, resorting to the base politics of fear and division“.

    Ms Bishop said Ms Gillard “knows full well that the Coalition will not change the laws regarding abortion, and for her to raise this as an election issue is offensive and she should apologise for her false claims“.

    Feminist commentator Eva Cox said she was “wary” of Ms Gillard’s latest bid to win female votes. “I think it’s a fairly shallow attempt,” she said. “I am much more interested in the policies she’s putting out there, not the rhetoric and there’s nothing new or exciting here for women.”

    Ms Cox took issue with Ms Gillard’s use of the abortion debate, saying it was “not really a federal issue”, and she was just attempting to turn the focus on to Mr Abbott…

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/julia-gillard-fires-abortion-salvo-in-gender-war/story-fn59niix-1226662153495

    Gillard was absolutely spot-on.

  • 66
    dave
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:22 am | Permalink

    AussieAchmed@36

    Abbotts comment on abortion

    ‘The problem with the Australian practice of abortion is that an objectively grave matter has been reduced to a question of the mother’s convenience.’

    Not that far from Bernardi’s

    Abbott has a range of people pushing his ideas in public and they wear any blow back.

    Gutless abbott yet again.

  • 67
    Acerbic Conehead
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:22 am | Permalink

    You’ll remember the very recent scandal surrounding the private company (Serco) that has the contract from governments to manage correctional and detention facilities.

    Seemingly, Serco staff are being stingy with the handing out of tampons. However, one of the staff involved has been overheard singing in the shower his version of the old 1930’s protest song, “Brother, can you spare a dime?”, and puts the blame fairly and squarely on the Federal government.

    There might be some blame-shifting going on, but if you feel like it, sing along in sympathy with him, as he does his Bing Crosby impersonation.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I8-CbJYGMA

    They used to tell us we were building a dream
    Incarcerating the mob
    When there were cons to clamp or illegals to quarantine
    We were always there right on the job
    :- (
    They used to tell us we were building a dream
    With peace and justice to be had
    Why should I be part of a scheme
    Which won’t supply enough pads?
    :- (
    Once we had a system, made merry hay
    Earned money for jam
    Now they’ve cut our budget, we say
    “Sister, we can’t spare a tam”
    :- (
    Before they slashed our budget that day
    Floss, mouthwash and balm
    Were within our outlay
    Now we say
    “Sister, we can’t spare a tam”
    :- (
    Once we gave out insoles, gee they worked well
    For those whose shoes didn’t quite fit
    Now the Feds need to hold on to them because
    They’re always putting their foot in it
    :- (
    Say, don’t you remember, when sponges were plentiful
    Bountiful, not a problem
    Now the Feds keep ‘em and sponge off the taxpayer, sayin’
    “Sister, as with sponges, we can’t spare a tam”
    :- (
    Once we had a system, made merry hay
    Earned money for jam
    Now they’ve cut our budget, we say
    “Sister, we can’t spare a tam”
    :- (
    Once toilet paper, ah gee we provided well
    The dunnies were rolling in it
    Now the government doesn’t supply any
    Need it themselves, cos they’re so fulla shit
    :- (
    Once we had a system, made merry hay
    Earned money for jam
    Now they’ve cut our budget, we say
    “Sister, we can’t spare a tam”

  • 68
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:23 am | Permalink

    Nice little piece on the correlation between single parents and crime rates –

    http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2012/11/27/correlation-and-causation-single-mothers-and-violent-crime/

  • 69
    dave
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:25 am | Permalink

    poroti@45

    Another Abbott quote.


    To a pregnant 14-year-old struggling to grasp what’s happening, for example, example, a senior student with a whole life mapped out or a mother already failing to cope under difficult circumstances, abortion is the easy way out. It’s hardly surprising that people should choose the most convenient exit from awkward situations.


    http://womenagainstabbott.wordpress.com/

    Yeah – like abbott walking (running ?) away from the same sort of situation.

    Gutless.

  • 70
    confessions
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:28 am | Permalink

    a prediction for which she was mocked by the Opposition, the media group-thinkers and, to their shame, many feminists,

    As well as some of the whiteanters in her own Caucus. Remember Husic and co wearing nothing but blue ties to ridicule her observations? And when was the last time we saw Abbott in a tie of any colour other than blue?

  • 71
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    YB

    Cori Bernardi is a tit.

    So he has gone from being a dog to a bird? ;-)

  • 72
    DisplayName
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    The plural of sheep is sheepen.

  • 73
    muttleymcgee
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:30 am | Permalink

    Happy New Year!

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jan/02/labor-betrayed-itself-and-its-values-when-it-betrayed-single-parents

    Worth a read.

  • 74
    confessions
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:30 am | Permalink

    And Eva Cox also praised Abbott’s regressive PPL scheme. I wonder how she’s going to feel when it gets dumped.

  • 75
    billie
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:31 am | Permalink

    Cori is a Labor weapon

    How many women can afford to pop out babies because their contraception failed? Most households rely on 2 adult incomes to cover the rent / mortgage. As my sister pithily remarked when pregnant with number 3 “this is the last, we won’t be able to drive a normal car if we have more than 3 kids – as she booked husband in to have the snip”

    Cori is also espousing a return to Workchoices, just to keep the employees on side. Smart contractors know that if permanents conditions get eroded then so will their conditions

  • 76
    psyclaw
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:31 am | Permalink

    Fran

    When one listens carefully, malapropisms occur with surprising frequency on telly and radio.

    Other things besides poor word knowledge are probably at work (haste, stress, unfamiliarity with the subject matter, distractions etc) and there is no opportunity to have a retake.

    In most cases I suspect the speaker is well aware of their error on review, if not immediately.

    It is a bit different in the written form where it is not “live to air” and we all presumably try to monitor for errors. There, poor word knowledge is more likely to be in play.

    In ST’s case maybe the lack of understanding comes the original writer of his copy source???

    BTW I have noticed that since ST’s NY “resolution” to be a kinder person, some of the posts have become wider in their topic scope and maybe even more discussive in nature.

    Has a new worker taken over duties for 2014?

    Regarding “phenomenom” I am glad you included “ostensibly” in your comment. Can one ever be fully educated without a working knowledge of Latin and Greek !!!!

  • 77
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:34 am | Permalink

    Lizzie

    As a fellow pedant, I have been hearing the transformation of phenomenon (singular) into phenomena (actually the plural but used as a singular) for several years. The funniest is when people carefully use the plural ‘phenomenas’.

    I’ve heard that too, but usually from the less educated. Someone I know used it and in fun I said, “I believe you’ll find that’s ‘phenomenata’ “. ;-)

    I am naughty.

  • 78
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:42 am | Permalink

    @abcnews: #Adelaide has been shaken by an earth tremor, hours after a separate small quake was recorded east of Flinders Ranges http://t.co/08jpy2w4s0

  • 79
    Steve777
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 9:49 am | Permalink

    A 2.6 quake is very small. Many, possibly most, would not feel it. The Gulf Region of South Australia is, by Australian standards, a seismically active area. A 5.6 earthquake in Adelaide in 1954 (same reading as the 1989 Newcastle Earthquake) which caused significant damage but no serious casualties: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1954_Adelaide_earthquake

  • 80
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:03 am | Permalink

    I wonder how the new Senator Lambie is going to react to Senator Bernadi comments. Do not know PUP policy or her personal views and how that may flow on to all issues voted on.

  • 81
    Patrick Bateman
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:04 am | Permalink

    Fran, forget about the phenomena phenomenon, we need to step in and defend “literally” now before gen Y turns it into “figuratively”.

    I have noticed that in the last 6 months many, many grammatical errors are slipping into the ABC’s online content. They seem to have fired anyone who knows how to write, or possibly they have just misplaced their copy of Fowlers.

  • 82
    Acerbic Conehead
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:05 am | Permalink

    Smssiva,

    BK
    Re David Rowe. I could not work it out as well.

    Our coal exporting prospects to China in the future are stuffed?

    http://www.afr.com/p/national/cartoon_gallery_david_rowe_1g8WHy9urgOIQrWQ0IrkdO

  • 83
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:06 am | Permalink

    @marqoftheshire: It appears that @corybernardi ‘s crackpot views have spooked even the LNP’s owner, Rupert Murdoch http://t.co/DEH4gzpga3

    #auspol

  • 84
    MTBW
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:08 am | Permalink

    zoomster

    I’m not against discussion of the issues – I’m just against exaggerating them, or using them to suggest that they’re an indication of the decay of society.

    You obviously don’t live in Sydney it is almost one a night here and it is a worry.

    The AHA have too much invested in donations to the Liberal Party.

    There are far too many cases which involve amphetamines and ice and something need to be done to address these problems.

    I just thank God that it isn’t my kids in a coma.

  • 85
    dave
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:10 am | Permalink

    Acerbic Conehead@82

    Smssiva,


    BK
    Re David Rowe. I could not work it out as well.


    Our coal exporting prospects to China in the future are stuffed?

    http://www.afr.com/p/national/cartoon_gallery_david_rowe_1g8WHy9urgOIQrWQ0IrkdO

    Where we stand in relation to the Chinese ?

    Who needs who the most ?

  • 86
    Patrick Bateman
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:11 am | Permalink

    Yes, some people run away when confronted by an unwanted pregnancy…

    Or reporters with unscripted questions. How many press conferences have lost their chance at life when Abbott has callously aborted them?

  • 87
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:14 am | Permalink

    Fran and Patrick

    For some time I have been annoyed at the “Microsoft-ation” of Australian English. Spellcheck is a treacherous invader.

    Oh, and wrt to the pronunciation of “router”. I thought “rowter” was simply the computer version until I heard Stephen Fry say “rooter”, obviously following the English-French route.

    Perhaps the Americans are too prissy to say rooter!!

  • 88
    Otiose
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:17 am | Permalink

    BK

    RE Rowe’s cartoon

    Coal projects may be stranded by China’s slowing demand

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/business/coal-projects-may-be-stranded-by-chinas-slowing-demand-20131216-2zhax.html#ixzz2pZKnVFqD

  • 89
    Asha Leu
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:17 am | Permalink

    @guytaur 80

    I’m pretty sure she’s pro-life. I seem to remember an interview shortly after she was elected where she said she had fairly conservative views about those sorts of social issues.

  • 90
    Patrick Bateman
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:18 am | Permalink

    There are far too many cases which involve amphetamines and ice and something need to be done to address these problems.

    This might sound ridiculous but I think you have to put ice is a special category alongside heroin in terms of its destructive capabilities and addictiveness.

    I’d say speed is somewhere in the middle, a problem but nothing like as bad as ice.

    One thing we need to look at urgently is abandoning the ridiculous American notion that all “drugs” (except alcohol… and nicotine… and caffeine…) are equally terrible and that prohibition and criminalisation is the key. Hell, even the US is slowly abandoning that. While we continue to equate ice/meth with weed and ecstasy, we’re effectively trying to fight against the recreational habits of half of young people instead of the addictions of a tiny percentage who are the real problem users.

  • 91
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:21 am | Permalink

    Patrick

    I have thought that for some time.

  • 92
    mari
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:23 am | Permalink

    Re Cory Bernardi views, I put 2 tweets on about that, one on what Julia Gillard warned , the other the abc link, I have never had such a huge response before a lot from people tweeters I hadn’t heard from before, I don’t think it is popular somehow. :devil: They are still coming in

    BTW to date not a troll in sight

  • 93
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:25 am | Permalink

    Asha

    Thanks for that. No likely change on this issue due to votes then. :(

  • 94
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:26 am | Permalink

    MTBW

    Increased reporting of a particular crime doesn’t mean there’s actually an increase in crime (which is my point).

    From the Sydney crime map -

    SYDNEY Local Government Area

    Oct 2012 to Sep 2013

    Non-domestic assault incidents

    2 year trend: Down 4.1% per year

    Rate per 100,000 population: 1966.2

    NSW rate per 100,000 population: 474.0

    And the stats –

    http://www.bocsar.nsw.gov.au/agdbasev7wr/_assets/bocsar/m716854l3/nswrecordedcrimestatisticssep2013_sa4.pdf

    Assaults in Sydney has been consistently dropping over the past few years.

  • 95
    Patrick Bateman
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:27 am | Permalink

    Oh, and wrt to the pronunciation of “router”. I thought “rowter” was simply the computer version until I heard Stephen Fry say “rooter”, obviously following the English-French route.

    Perhaps the Americans are too prissy to say rooter!!

    Interesting one – seems to me that if they invent something, they can probably decide how it’s pronounced. Plus as someone who used to work in computer science in Australia, I’m quite happy that I didn’t spend my time talkign about ‘rooters’.

    A point of controversy in the Australian comp sci world is gigabyte – apparently originally intended to be pronounced “jigga bite” rather than with a soft g. I had one professor who studiously pronounced it the ‘right’ way to much hilarity. Sounds like a Will Smith album to me.

  • 96
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:29 am | Permalink

    Drat – by reporting, I mean ‘media reporting’.

    But the statement remains true either way – for example, this paper
    http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/341-360/tandi359/view%20paper.html

    suggests that some apparent crime increases are due to people (including the police) being more willing to report a crime, rather than the incidence of a crime increasing.

  • 97
    Patrick Bateman
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:32 am | Permalink

    zoomster – you would think that sexual assaults in particular would have been reported at an ever growing rate as a percentage of actual crimes occurring. In my lifetime (early 30s) I think it’s gone from a somewhat taboo issue to one we as a society now discuss quite freely.

  • 98
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    Perhaps the Americans are too prissy to say rooter!!

    My mother’s name is “Ruth”. My father, a Lithuanian immigrant, couldn’t pronounce ‘th’ and was thus too embarrased to say her name.

    My name is the nickname he came up with to get around the problem!

  • 99
    MTBW
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:41 am | Permalink

    zoomster

    Point taken but it is the increase in fatal violence that is the problem.

    See Thomas Kelly!

  • 100
    Patrick Bateman
    Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:44 am | Permalink

    MTBW –

    The murder and homicide rates are both declining in Australia.

    http://www.aic.gov.au/statistics/homicide.html

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