tip off

Galaxy: 50-50 (plus quarterly Newspoll breakdowns)

The first Galaxy poll since the federal election finds nothing in it, while Newspoll’s quarterly breakdowns suggest the swing is weakest in the state where voters head to the polls on Saturday.

The Daily Telegraph has results of a Galaxy poll of federal voting intention showing the two major parties tied on two-party preferred, and while the accompanying graphic is spoiled by a production error, it’s clear enough the primary vote results are 43% for the Coalition, 37% for Labor and 10% for the Greens. It also finds 56% opposed to cuts in welfare spending against only 34% in support. The poll was conducted from Friday to Sunday from a sample of 998. The Australian also brings Newspoll’s quarterly aggregates of voting intention broken down by state, gender, age cohorts and capitals-versus-regionals, which have Labor leading 53-47 in New South Wales, 57-43 in Victoria and 54-46 in South Australia, and trailing 51-49 in Queensland and 54-46 in Western Australia.

UPDATE (ReachTEL): Channel Seven reports the monthly ReachTEL result has Labor leading 52-48 – primary votes will have to wait until the morning. The Seven report also relates that 26% of respondents support the Prime Minister’s decision on imperial titles with 45% opposed, and that only 19% expect to be better off financially over the next year compared with 43% who expect to be worse off, respectively down five and up four on three months ago. More on this poll either this evening or tomorrow.

UPDATE (Essential Research): A considerable move to Labor on Essential Research’s fortnightly rolling average, with the Coalition moving from 51-49 ahead to 51-49 behind. There are also two-point shifts on the primary vote, Labor up to 39% and the Coalition down to 42%, with the Greens steady on 9% and Palmer United down one to 3%.

2028
  • 801
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:24 pm | Permalink

    There was a very interesting article in New Matilda last year about Millers Point.

    Of course it escaped everyone’s attention at the time.

    Can Millers Point Fight Gentrification?

    Early in 2013, the O’Farrell Government engaged a consultancy to do a Social Impact Assessment Survey of the impact of the planned sell-off and dispersal of the residents.

    Rather than being passive bystanders, a group representative of residents, CoRE, was established to provide input – people with experience, involvement, memory, a legacy, and (inextricably!) a collective consciousness.

    Options that CoRE has offered to the LHC include conversion to a Cooperative structure or restructured under a Community Tenancy Association.

    Currently vacant houses would be sold to finance renovations and development of the alternative structure. The consultation process continues.

    Two unexpected developments occurred in early August. An Auditor-General’s report, Making the Best Use of Public Housing, exposes the budgetary crisis.

    Nevertheless, the report claims that LHC’s de facto response of selling off properties (budgeted at $165 million for 2012-13) and rationing capital/maintenance expenditure "is not financially sustainable long-term".

    Read more, both before and after this extract.

    https://newmatilda.com/2013/08/19/can-millers-point-fight-gentrification

    Does anyone seriously believe this isn’t about pandering to the already wealthy, rather than helping some already disadvantaged?

    I didn’t think so.

  • 802
    briefly
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

    769....bemused

    Of course, because the economic resources – labour supply, educational services, land, buildings, capital – of other jurisdictions are used in off-shored production, it is quite true to say that the offshore economy represents an expansion of our own economic capacity: we can do more to satisfy our own economic demands while using fewer of our economic resources. We can use these spare resources to satisfy more of our demands as well as those transmitted to us from other jurisdictions.

    Having said that, people are worried about their employment opportunities. This is real and understandable. It follows that we must understand where demand for labour originates. It is certain that he spent income of one generates demand for the labour of another. Income creates jobs. This is the causal chain. It is therefore axiomatic that if we are going to create new demand for labour in the economy we have to grow real incomes.

    A corollary of this is that we should enable the adoption of new production methods and market systems that reduce output costs because this will increase real incomes in the economy transmit into new labour demand.

    The reason we are experiencing rising unemployment at the moment is because we failed to invest enough in the past – we failed to create the capital structure – that will grow incomes faster than our population. It is certainly the case that the more we do to retard the growth in real incomes (and their equitable distribution) the worse will be our eventual employment outcomes.

    This causal chain is the motor of economic development. We ignore it at our cost. It also entails a rejection of so-called protection, which only puts a brake on real income growth and costs jobs in the long run.

  • 803
    guytaur
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

    No change on interest rates

  • 804
    WeWantPaul
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:31 pm | Permalink

    Next day the boss comes up to me & says stop playing silly buggers because the old dear had been onto her local councilor & caused all sorts of problems.

    As a former local councillor all my sympathy is with the councillor. There should be a law against false incitement to the exercise of civic rights!

  • 805
    Jackol
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:32 pm | Permalink

    We are careering down the same path to a bust as the US and Ireland did 7 years ago.

    If the 4 corners report on China last night had any substance, and if cashed up Chinese are impacting on our house prices, it may well be that it’s actually China that is careening down the same path, and we’re getting caught up in China’s slipstream.

  • 806
    Simon Katich
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    Interest rates on hold – RBA expect solid growth in housing construction.

    http://www.rba.gov.au/media-releases/2014/mr-14-05.html

  • 807
    bemused
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

    briefly@802


    769….bemused


    This causal chain is the motor of economic development. We ignore it at our cost. It also entails a rejection of so-called protection, which only puts a brake on real income growth and costs jobs in the long run.

    You completely ignore the protectionist behaviour of our trading partners and that some of them take a strategic view to expand certain industries at the expense of other countries. They engage in predatory practices to the detriment of Australia.

    I am all for lots more investment, but I want the fruits of it to go to Australians and not to provide jobs for citizens of other countries. That is a job for foreign aid projects.

  • 808
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    In 1997-98 a three-bedroom ex-housing commission joint, in Newborough, was selling for about $20,000. And that was one in a prime location, on a 1/4-acre block.

    By 2002, they were selling for approximately $40,000.

    Today, they’re upwards of $200,000 – for 2-bedrm renovator’s delight.

  • 809
    guytaur
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    @bencubby: Labor now says Australia should cut its greenhouse emissions by at least 15% by 2020. http://t.co/AvTMmEgJvf #climate #IPCC

  • 810
    Libertarian Unionist
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

    If the 4 corners report on China last night had any substance, and if cashed up Chinese are impacting on our house prices, it may well be that it’s actually China that is careening down the same path, and we’re getting caught up in China’s slipstream.

    Oh, it’s not our negative gearing regime, our capital gains tax exemptions, our land supply limitations, our ridiculously low interest rates, our relaxed superannuation investment restrictions, it hot Chinese (or US) money. I don’t want to hear excuses.

  • 811
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    Crikey.com.au ‏@crikey_news 26m
    It's now past midday, so it's only fair to confirm our story about the new SBS board appointments was a cruel April Fool's prank. (SB)
    12:28 PM - 1 Apr 2014

    The beauty of this as an April Fool joke is that it’s actually entirely plausible, even predictable under the current government.

  • 812
    Libertarian Unionist
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    Jackol, I should also say that yes, China’s RE boom is unlike anything seen on earth. It will make for very *interesting times* when it unravels.

  • 813
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    The beauty of this as an April Fool joke is that it’s actually entirely plausible, even predictable under the current government.

    And to think I actually fooled my kids each April Fool’s Day by telling them our male dog had given birth.

    It’s so disheartening to know that this government of ours is so discredited already that it’s possible to believe stupidity.

    Then, it’s no April Fools to know this government is completely stupid.

  • 814
    ausdavo
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

    briefly 802

    Another factor affecting growth is the saving ratio. As a nation we are now saving much more ie not consuming as much. This has a marked effect on business & income growth.

  • 815
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    Kate McClymont ‏@Kate_McClymont 3 hrs
    Invetment banker Brook said Moses Obeid told him in 08 that the Obeids had a "high equity holding" in AWH. Nicky DG came to mereting #icac

  • 816
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    Retweeted by Kate McClymont
    Michaela Whitbourn ‏@MWhitbourn 29 mins
    #ICAC hears the Obeids loaned AWH $486k in 2011 and later converted into shares held in Nick Di Girolamo's name. He sold the shares later

  • 817
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:04 pm | Permalink

    Ausdavo,

    Only skimmed the more rabid, paranoid bits of that blogger’s post on Diego Garcia, so got the date wrong.

    Whatever, it doesn’t diminish the analysis. The EXIF metadata DOES locate the photo and the call (more importantly) as being made from Diego Garcia, on dry land, not out to sea a little.

    However, it does invite questions about just what this IBM techno guy was doing with an iPhone while incarcerated in a supposedly secure faciity, 10 days after the disappearance of the aircraft. You’d have thought he’d have been searched, and all calls out blocked, or at least monitored.

    Then again, maybe it was a mistake and he DID manage to get a call out.

    I’m just a theorist from a satellite’s eye view, 200 miles up, using some scraps of facts and making some connections.

    What I do hold to is that IF you wanted to hijack a plane and hide it in the Indian Ocean area, there is no better place than Diego Garcia within range.

    Bagram would be just as good, but they’d have had to fly over India and/or Pakistan to do that, and those guys are paranoid about air incursions.

    No… Diego Garcia is the single most likely place, given the hijack scenario and the known direction of the aircraft.

    I’m acquainted with a connected “someone who knows” about these kinds of things. He’s normally quite loquacious about giving inside tips and speculating on various scientific and navigational issues (usually to shoot me down in flames, as he has genuine inside knowledge).

    When I put Diego Garcia to him a couple of weeks ago, he clammed up tighter than a fish’s sphincter. Just went all quiet. Very unlike him.

    Usually, if he thought I was wrong, he’d give me a chapter and verse pasting as to why I’m an idiot. I’d argue back of course, but that’s not the point here.

    On this occasion he just clammed up and made no comment.

  • 818
    kakuru
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:11 pm | Permalink

    BB:

    The beauty of this as an April Fool joke is that it’s actually entirely plausible, even predictable under the current government.

    All that was missing to make it even more plausible was Akerman and Mirabella being offered a knighthood and damehood, in gratitude for their services to Australia.

  • 819
    deblonay
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

    The far Right on the march in France too
    +++++___________
    The Washington Post reports on the catastrophic defeat of the Socialists in the second round of the Municipal elections,where they lost over 150 towns and cities to the main right wing party UMP…but also a dozen more to Le Pen’s National Front
    At the same time some speak of a new “Tea Party” grouping amongst conservatives,who are scorning the traditional liberalism of much French life and culture
    This reflects the rise of far-right and neo-fascist parties across Europe from Greece,to UKIP in the UK and in other places like Hungary and the Ukraine

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/social-conservatives-are-mobilizing-in-france-leading-to-talk-of-a-tea-party/2014/03/31/1e8d95ee-9afa-11e3-8112-52fdf646027b_story.html

  • 820
    Henry
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:15 pm | Permalink

    So this guy in diego garcia hid an iphone in his butt?
    Man that is eye watering stuff.
    I also thought it was a pisstake tbh.

  • 821
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    Henry

    Big Ass.

  • 822
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

    So this guy in diego garcia hid an iphone in his butt?
    Man that is eye watering stuff.
    I also thought it was a pisstake tbh.

    Yes, hiding an iPhone up your clacker for 8 days, then using it does cause a certain… er… discomforting… shiver to run up one’s spine.

    On an entirely practical level, it would mean he hadn’t done a poo for that 8 days, or if he had, he must have…

    Yuck.

    Perhaps it’s a photo of the inside of a Diego Garcia toilet bowl, which invites the question, does the photoanalysis provided indicate that it’s a squatty, or a sitty?

    Perhaps he didn’t make the call at all, of course. Perhaps some sympathetic person confiscated the phone right at the start and then either bumped the send key, or transmitted the message to get the info out several days later.

    That, uhm, sits better with me.

  • 823
    Diogenes
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:22 pm | Permalink

    WWP

    There are about 50,000 people on the waiting list for public housing in NSW.

    In medicine, we don’t give a lucky few exceptional costly care at the expense of leaving more people on the waiting list.

    That isn’t fair to the people waiting and the same applies to housing.

    Its about responsible use of resources for the most people.

  • 824
    deblonay
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    Chinese and houses in Oz
    ______________
    Near where we live is stands alone house 2 storied,on a small block detached from a house nearby and constucted a few years ago
    One one occasion walking past I saw an asian family,older adults.teenagers) coming and going ..but after that the house has been closed up.blinds always drawn,never a light at night/no car / and no bins put out…absolutely deserted …so the asian owners must have bought it as an investment or for later use…but now not in use
    no sign of tenants either and this is not uncommon in some parts of Melb I am told

    In our suburb rents are high too and tenants often seeking places…very odd

  • 825
    fredex
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:28 pm | Permalink

    Does anybody have access to ReachTEL’s primary votes and if so care to share?

  • 826
    bemused
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    Diogenes@823

    WWP

    There are about 50,000 people on the waiting list for public housing in NSW.

    In medicine, we don’t give a lucky few exceptional costly care at the expense of leaving more people on the waiting list.

    That isn’t fair to the people waiting and the same applies to housing.

    Its about responsible use of resources for the most people.

    Neither do you undo the effect of an operation because the outcome was too good and then get it re-done by a lesser skilled surgeon.

    Please stick to valid comparisons.

    If someone was lucky and got better than average housing, you don’t then take it off them. You get on with housing the others.

  • 827
    Libertarian Unionist
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:32 pm | Permalink

    Near where we live is stands alone house 2 storied... owners must have bought it as an investment or for later use…but now not in use
    no sign of tenants either and this is not uncommon in some parts of Melb I am told

    And this is one of the key rationales for a land tax – it puts in place incentives that push land to its most productive use. With it, we’d have less of this absent investment home phenomenon, and less of its nasty twin, developer land banking.

  • 828
    MTBW
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    Dio

    Your calculation of 50,000 would be about right.

    The problem is that State Governments do not build enough housing for those who need it.

    It is terribly hard for those on the DOH list to find shelter.

    Many are mentally ill many sleep in doorways over night and others carry their goods and chattels around with them.

    Some as I said earlier illegally get on trains from Sydney to Newcastle every night so they won’t be abused on the street.

    This is a very difficult problem to address but a wealthy country like ours could do much better than it does.

    There but for the grace of God go I should be the meme.

    As I said earlier James Packer will be very happy to have posh joints around his Barangaroo Development.

  • 829
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    Diogs

    In medicine, we don’t give a lucky few exceptional costly care at the expense of leaving more people on the waiting list.

    Yeah, but you sure charge for it.

    You know, and I know, that you doctors have no compunction in over-charging for services rendered, especially if you can over-charge on the public purse.

    Not least because a lot of you earned your degrees on the public purse, back in the 70-80s.

    Do you really care about the 50,000 on a waiting list in NSW? Doubt it.

    That isn’t fair to the people waiting and the same applies to housing.

    No it doesn’t. It’s not always a case of a life or death situation if someone doesn’t get publicly housed. But it is often a life or death situation if someone doesn’t get the medical care they need.

    The two situations don’t correlate at all.

    If you really believed in utilitarianism then you wouldn’t conflate public housing with medical attention.

    You’d be more on about who needed immediate medical care. And it wouldn’t be Kerry Packer and a kidney transplant, would it?

    You are just championing user pays; not needs, disguised as being socially aware.

  • 830
    Diogenes
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    Bemused

    You can’t undo the effects of surgery and transfer them to someone else.

  • 831
    Diogenes
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:35 pm | Permalink

    kezza

    In medicine, we don’t give a lucky few exceptional costly care at the expense of leaving more people on the waiting list.
    Yeah, but you sure charge for it.

    Umm no.

    We are talking about the public system here and there are no charges.

  • 832
    Rex Douglas
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    Victorian parly in chaos again.

    Votes tied re Govts business program… against tradition speaker again bails out Napthine Govt by casting vote for the ayes… uproar

  • 833
    Simon Katich
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    Briefly

    people are worried about their employment opportunities

    people are actually suffering from losing their employment. This will continue and the economy will suffer accordingly if not addressed.

    This causal chain is the motor of economic development.

    It may well be part of it, but innovation and increased efficiency is also important. Many corporations are choosing to focus on the shortcuts as their means to improved profits – offshoring is just one shortcut. This focus on shortcuts comes at the expense of innovation and efficiency improvements.

    I have heard the conversations – ‘if we offshore our drafting, not only do we get to pay lower salaries but we can have a smaller office and dont have to worry about all the OHS stuff and award conditions’…’Do we still charge them out at the same rate?’…..’Ofcourse!’.

  • 834
    Diogenes
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    kezza

    Do you really care about the 50,000 on a waiting list in NSW? Doubt it.

    Yes.

  • 835
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    Diogs

    We are talking about the public system here and there are no charges.

    Crap. And you know it. The public purse always gets charged for services rendered.

    You know, your argument about medical services becoming more unaffordable makes sense because you are over-charging the public purse.

    It’s about time you doctors started making a real contribution to society, instead of relying on the public purse.

    Sure, you work long hours, and you need to be recompensed for doing the same, but you don’t need to over-charge, and that’s what you’re doing.

    You, collectively, are making medical treatment unaffordable, because everything you do is charged to the taxpayer.

    Even the bloody private operators.

    You can’t tell me that a private hospital that paints a suite pink to suit a private patient hasn’t somehow worked out how to bill the public.

    It’s just not the corrupt LNP-controlled AWH that hasn’t worked out a way to charge the taxpayer for private profit.

  • 836
    ausdavo
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    BB 817

    In the article on MH370 he does say that the phone may have been hidden only until searched then subsequently removed and secreted in clothing (no further searches?) obviously after being washed. Maybe the delayed use was to allow it to dry out? Incidentally, how long does an iphone battery last when not used?

    Very interesting in your description that “your informant” went so quiet (clammed up)!

    I guess we now know why Malay PM put Abbott in charge of search off WA. They both talk out of the place where that iphone was hidden. They each make contradictory statements from one interview to the next. Good bed-fellows methinks?

  • 837
    ausdavo
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

    LU at 827

    How about we throw a howler into the housing availability problem?

    As per Deb at 824 re unused houses.

    Any house unused for over 3 months (electricity tells us) is automatically leased by the government for the provision of housing for those in need?

    Rent paid to owner – better than squatters getting in?

  • 838
    zoomster
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

    kezza

    given the quality of medical services we get for the price we pay, there can’t be much over charging going on.

  • 839
    briefly
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:49 pm | Permalink

    807....bemused

    I don’t ignore the protectionism of others by any means. We can see, for example, that the protection of French or German or Italian agriculture not only harms our agricultural sector. It harms the incomes of their own consumers too. A consequence is that domestic demand in these economies is lower than it otherwise would be, economic growth is lower than it could be and employment growth has not kept up even with their very low rates of population growth. By “protecting” their agriculture, they have reduced the real wages of their urban workers and have elected to run high-unemployment labour markets.

    We can do the same if we like: choose to increase “protection” for some parts of our economy – say, if you like, parts of the service sector which is now by far our largest employer. But if we do we will reduce real incomes and very soon also increase unemployment.

    We have been trained to think about imported goods and services as a loss to our economy. But in fact the reverse is true: they represent our ability to command supply of some of the production of other economies. Import supply chains represent an addition to our own economic capacity. If you doubt this, consider our iron ore industry. This industry is almost completely reliant on export demand, which is to say we have mobilized our economic resources and placed them at the disposal of other economies. The iron ore industry represents about 5% of our economy these days and it really exists only as a subset of the production of others. We really can say the iron ore “economy” is only partly ours: it is owned and funded by and serves the demands of our external investment and trading partners.

    Note, I’m not saying this is a bad thing. What I am trying to do is make the point that our understanding of the economy is incomplete.

    Others may apply protectionist measures but, to the extent they do this, they mostly harm themselves. Self-evidently, we should eschew the desire to copy the mercantilist policies that suppress growth and retard economic dynamism.

  • 840
    kevjohnno
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

    The Jim Stone website with the fake photo is certainly an eyeopener. Loved his work on Fukushima. Come back Deblonay all is forgiven.

    I like how right at the end of the page he is forced to admit that the EXIF data can be easliy altered but sticks to his guns ‘That means that it is possible to fake this. But it does not mean that it is faked.”

  • 841
    mexicanbeemer
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:52 pm | Permalink

    There is some irony about pubic housing and wealthy suburbs, that being many of those now wealthy suburbs were once slums that were cleaned up thanks to the construction of public housing.

    We see this right across inner Melbourne where once working class parts are now firmly middle class.

    Chapel Street is one such example of a street which fifty years ago was a slum.

    Another example at the conclusion of the great depression and WWII many suburbs we would class as rich such as Hawthorn and South Yarra had as many slums as Richmond and Collingwood.

    It is still possible to buy units and small cottages in many areas on the average family income and you can still see the old Richmond or old St Kilda.

    People on lower incomes are facing an unspoken problem, sure its nice to have a property in a well heeled area but the cost of living in these areas is increasing to the point where low income earners might live there but barely.

  • 842
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    Diogs

    Why would you care about 50,000 on a waiting list for public housing in NSW when you’re in SA?

    How does it impact on you?

    Why do you care that 400 families in Millers Point are going to be evicted? Seriously, why?

    Surely, being an advocate for better health outcomes you’d rather those 400 families stay in an area that would be better for their health, both physical and psychological, than being relocated to an area with less facilities.

    For the public good, it is better to have a mix of public and private housing, not the establishment of a privileged enclave.

    If you really feel so strongly about it, then I suspect you would be injecting your opinion into Victorian Planning. But I doubt you have.

    Why aren’t you taking Matthew Guy to task over his backflips on Phillip Island. The waterfront there is almost an exclusive conclave.

    I guess you have illusions about buying property on Sydney’s waterfront rather than the backwater of Phillip Island.

  • 843
    Rex Douglas
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

    I’m predicting an ALP landslide in the upcoming Victorian state election.

  • 844
    ausdavo
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

    kevjohnno 840

    Yes right through he says it can be faked but also says that a fake can be easily detected. The question is … why fake it?

  • 845
    kezza2
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

    zoomster
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:48 pm | PERMALINK
    kezza

    given the quality of medical services we get for the price we pay, there can’t be much over charging going on.

    Oh, I’m not saying we don’t get quality for service, I’m talking about the subsidy paid by the government to medical people for the service we get.

    There’s a difference. And over-charging doctors is just the tip of the iceberg.

  • 846
    Libertarian Unionist
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

    It’s about time you doctors started making a real contribution to society, instead of relying on the public purse.

    That’s a fairly strong statement Kezza.

    Most Drs I know who work in the public system contribute in several ways beyond their primary roles, and most Drs I know who work privately do so only part-time and also work part-time in the public sector. Public doctors train the next cohort of doctors. They treat the most complex (and expensive) cases, because the private sector does not have the capacity. They have to deal with all sorts of bureaucratic nonsense, and if they manage to “overcharge” its in the form of satisfying the billing and accountability requirements pushed down on them from the afore-mentioned bureaucracy. They get paid their salary regardless of the work they undertake, but they often work longer than they are notionally paid for.

    Where I might agree with you is that specialist colleges are closed shops, which operate ostensibly to keep standards high, but in practice also keep rates high.

  • 847
    deblonay
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

    In his weekly column on the US economy et al…James Kunstler looks at the folly of the USA being involved in the crisis in a bankrupt Eastern European state.Ukraine ….spending $5 billion in organising a coup there…when the lack of funds sees the infrastructure of the USA..at home …collapsing
    He ses this is a folly caused by the desires for Empire and it’s partner ..globaisation…which as he says in only a recent part of human life
    Globalisation is made possible in our time by cheap fuel/oil and gas……take it away and we will go back to a state where goods were made locally for local markets…as Oz once did..quite recently.He calls it” Attention Deficit”

    an interesting piece
    http://kunstler.com/clusterfuck-nation/attention-deficit/

  • 848
    fredex
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

    I don’t want to buy into a kezza vs dio debate but …well I suppose I am.
    So here goes.

    Dio you can’t artificially split 2 systems, public and private health, that operate simultaneously in the same spaces and with the same people.

    Firstly there are charges for the public system – it’s called ‘taxation’ in its various forms.
    And then there are the allocation of resources, time/money/ personnel, to one or the other sphere which when allocated [by whoever and by whatever method] to one of those 2 closely interrelated systems is rendered unavailable to the other. Opportunity cost in economic terms, what you are spending on one [for the benefit of whoever] is not spent on the other and those people lose.
    I’m hinting here, not being blunt.

    Anecdote.
    Ms fredex had an operation some time ago for what had become a debilitating chronic condition.
    Private system.
    Cost nearly $10,000 but performed within a few days of diagnosis.
    It was unsuccessful so now, a year later, she needs [and it is a 'need', not a 'want'] to have it again [she has been promised a better chance of success].
    So here is the dilemma.
    Do we opt for an op in a week or 2 at a cost of about $10,000 or wait for the public system to fit her in to their timetable which could take up to a year – so we are informed?

    Well it depends on how much is $10,000 doesn’t it?
    To someone on an income of, let’s say, $200,000, it has a different impact to someone on, let’s say most Australians, who are on less than $60,000 per household – before living costs and taxation of course.

    And note: the operation will be done in both cases by the same medico in the same place , its essentially just the money that is different.

    I think I’m on Kezza’s side on this one.

    ps this effects me cos ms fredex is suffering.

  • 849
    Libertarian Unionist
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 4:01 pm | Permalink

    Any house unused for over 3 months (electricity tells us) is automatically leased by the government for the provision of housing for those in need?

    Rent paid to owner – better than squatters getting in?

    Wow, that sounds complex and costly, requiring oversight and monitoring.

    Instead, why not have society charge them for the right to exclude others from using it?

    How? Apply a land tax (to everyone). If a person had to pay 5% of the value of their empty investment property every year in tax, I would guess that they would find a way to recoup some of that burden, maybe even by renting it out for others to live in.

  • 850
    psyclaw
    Posted Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 4:03 pm | Permalink

    Kezza

    Did you see the discussions about the health budget last night.

    There was proof positive that medic commentators here know SFA about the way health dollars are wasted and exploited …….. conlict-of-interest-generated-subjectivity IMHO.

    Diogenes told me that “fundamental reform” is needed, but gave no example. When I asked for an example he came up with the in-depth suggestion “we need to lower the standard of care” (to save money).

    Everything/ModLib came up with the suggestion that Big Pharma costs should be brought into line by the government, and also that the GPs should be on about 4 time based consultation fees/repayments from medicare.

    Neither of them could/would address the matter of reducing unnecessary hospitalisations by better targetting of local care for the many medical issues which if treated in a timely way don’t then end in hospitalisation.

    Neither of them addressed the issue of adverse events and their cost to the health budget.

    Over the years I have always been bemused/pissed off by the fact that in health budget discussions (invariably focussing on Medicare) always use the euphemism of “bllow out in the Medicare budget” when they are actually referring to “increase in doctors’ salaries”.

    The use of those last 4 words is evidently taboo.

Womens Agenda

loading...

Smart Company

loading...

StartupSmart

loading...

Property Observer

loading...