tip off

Seats of the week: Mayo and Sturt

After going through a lax period, Seat of the Week plays catch-up with a double-header featuring two Liberal seats in South Australia.

Mayo

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Based around the Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island, Mayo was created with the expansion of parliament in 1984 from territory which had mostly been covered by Barker, which was compensated for its losses by absorbing the Riverland from the abolished seat of Angas. All areas concerned are strongly conservative, with Labor never having held Mayo, Barker or Angas. It presently extends southwards from Kersbrook, 22 kilometres to the north-east of Adelaide, through Mount Barker and McLaren Vale to Goolwa at the mouth of the Murray River, and westwards to the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island.

Alexander Downer entered parliament as the seat’s inaugural member in 1984, his father Sir Alec Downer having been member for Angas from 1949 to 1963. The only threat to Downer’s hold on the seat over the next 24 years was the strength of the Australian Democrats in the Adelaide Hills, which became a live concern in 1998 when John Schumann, former lead singer of folk group Redgum (of “I Was Only Nineteen” fame), increased the Democrats vote from 12.4% to 22.4% to overtake the Labor candidate and fall 1.7% short of victory after the distribution of their preferences. The Democrats polled a more typical 14.8% in 2001, before collapsing to 1.8% in 2004. As well as bringing an end his 11-year career as Foreign Minister, the November 2007 election reduced Downer’s margin against Labor to single figures for the first time, following a swing of 6.5%. Downer stepped down from the front bench after the election defeat and announced his resignation from parliament the following July, initiating a by-election held in September.

The Liberal preselection was won by Jamie Briggs, who had worked in the Prime Minister’s Office as chief adviser on industrial relations, giving him a politically uncomfortable association with the unpopular WorkChoices policies. With the backing of Downer and John Howard, Briggs won the preselection vote in the seventh round by 157 to 111 over the party’s recently ousted state leader Iain Evans, who remains a senior figure in the state parliamentary party as member for Davenport. Among the preselection also-rans was housing mogul Bob Day, who reacted to his defeat by running as the candidate of Family First, for which he would eventually be elected a Senator in 2013. Labor did not contest the by-election, but Briggs was given a run for his money by Lynton Vonow of the Greens and independent Di Bell, a local anthropologist who had the backing of Nick Xenophon. With the Liberal vote falling from 51.1% to 41.3%, most of the non-Liberal vote split between the Greens (21.4%), Di Bell (16.3%) and Bob Day (11.4%). The distribution of preferences from Day and others left Vonow leading Bell 28.2% to 24.1% at the second-last count, with Briggs finishing 3.0% clear of Vonow after distribution of Bell’s preferences.

Briggs had no difficulties winning re-election in 2010, when he prevailed with a near-identical margin to Downer’s in 2007, or in 2010, when the margin returned to double-digit territory after a 5.2% swing. He won promotion to shadow parliamentary secretary in September 2012, emerging the beneficiary of the one minor reshuffle of the term occasioned by Senator Cory Bernardi’s resignation. After the 2013 election victory he was promoted to the outer ministry as Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development.

Sturt

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Christopher Pyne’s electorate of Sturt covers the inner eastern suburbs of Adelaide, including Payneham, Kensington, Tranmere and Skye east of the city, Klemzig, Campbelltown, Paradise and Highbury to the north, and Glenunga, Glen Osmond and Beaumont to the south. When created in 1949 it also covered northern Adelaide, which after 1955 formed the basis of the new electorate of Bonython (eventually to be abolished in 2004). The loss of this territory made Sturt notionally Liberal, prompting Labor member Norman Makin – who had gained Sturt from the Liberals at the 1954 election – to contest the new seat, which was very safe for Labor. Sturt has since been won by Labor only at the 1969 election, when a 15.0% swing secured a narrow victory for Norman Foster. South Australia bucked the national trend of the 1972 election in swinging slightly to the Liberals, enabling Ian Wilson to recover the seat he had lost at the previous election.

Wilson thereafter retained the seat by margins of between 2.0% and 10.3% until the 1993 election, when he was defeated for preselection by Christopher Pyne, a 25-year-old former staffer to Senator Amanda Vanstone. Pyne was already emerging as a powerbroker in the party’s moderate faction, and won promotion to shadow parliamentary secretary a year after entering parliament. However, he would have to wait until the Howard government’s final year in office to achieve ministerial rank, which was widely put down to his closeness to Peter Costello. Following the November 2007 election defeat he ran for the deputy leadership, finishing in third place with 18 votes behind Julie Bishop on 44 and Andrew Robb on 25. He served in high-profile positions on the opposition front bench over the next few years, first in justice and border protection under Brendan Nelson, then in education, apprenticeships and training under Malcolm Turnbull and Tony Abbott. In February 2009 he further gained the important role of manager of opposition business, to the chagrin of the party’s Right.

Pyne’s hold on Sturt came under serious threat at Labor’s electoral high-water mark in 2007 and 2010, his margin being cut on the former occasion from 6.8% to 0.9%. He did well on the latter to secure the seat with a swing of 2.5%, going against the trend of a statewide swing to Labor of 0.8%, and was safely re-elected with a further swing of 6.5% in 2013. Since the election of the Abbott government he has served as Education Minister and Leader of the House.

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  • 1
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:08 am | Permalink

    Seeing as a guest’s loud and incessant snoring has woken me up – through 2 closed doors – at 5am, I may as well be first.

  • 2
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:10 am | Permalink

    I use the word “guest” advisedly. Let’s just say he fell asleep and we couldn’t wake him up for long enough to get him to a bed.

    To amuse myself I counted,not sheep, but snores.

    25 breaths per minute – try it – is tantamount to panting speed. The guy mustn’t be getting all that much oxygen to be breathing – in his sleep – so rapidly.

    No wonder he’s always tired.

  • 3
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:38 am | Permalink

    I do love the way that Liberals and their sleeve tuggers suddenly think ICAC is over-reaching itself.

    Sure, it’s fine when it’s raking in Labor types, but when it starts ensnaring Kiberals, well, that’s going a bit too far.

    But think of it this way… if the Libs being bagged are the “good” Liberals, the honest ones, “men of integrity” etc., how bad must the actual crooks be?

    All Barry O’Farrell – a self-proclaimed ethical reformer and corruption fighter – did was omit to declare an expensive bottle of wine on the parliamentary register, seek to establish that he didn’t know a particular spiv (and then be proved wrong, they even swapped personal phone numbers) and then mislead the ICAC.

    Arthur Sinodinos, again in charge of an ethical area – this time of the financial industry and the rules surrounding it, as Assistant Treasurer of the Commonwealth – was unable to recall seeing or hearing of large cash donations going on right under his nose. The only donation – an what else can it be called for 20 hours work? – he homed in on was the $200,000 he was paid seemingly to peddle his company’s dodgy rackets to the state government.

    Breaking disclosure rules (while preaching honesty), misleading evidence under oath, seemingly terminal memory lapses and egregious inattention to detail… these are the standards to which our new lords and masters adhere. NSW, indeed Australia, is safe in their hands.

    The common thread between the two is that they are associated with spivs, shonks and lurk merchants, all of whom are seeking to make easy pickings of a gullible public, if only pesky regulations governing probity, ethics and fair dealing are repealed or, in some cases, completely overlooked. The Mums and Dads will be thrilled to know these are the people they elected to clean up the “mess” Labor left behind.

    I can hardly wait for the investigation into the Barangaroo deal. What a sweet way to work! Set up an elaborate book of rules and regulations to deal with tender processes – planning, ethics, fairness, even playing field and so on – and then skip around the lot by having one of your mates dream up an idea all by himself, thus making it not subject to all that public process red tape… because it’s a private project with, by definition, no competition possible.

    And what a prize at the end of it! Yet another casino. Just what Sydney needs. And on an ikonic, absolute Harbour frontage site, all without any serious oversight at all. Niiiiice!

    Poor Barry, he’s well out of it. Arthur, who is, despite his “fearsome”reputation, really not much more than another gofer for the Libs (he came from the wrong stock, unfortunately, wrong school, he’s not Catholic and he’s not even from Sydney), must be puzzled by his sudden fall from grace. In both cases Tony swore undying friendship and admiration. They don’t realise that a pledge of eternal loyalty from Tony Abbott is a Judas kiss.

    And where’s that bloody plane Tony was personally searching for (according to Mark Simkin, anyway)? I thought they found it three weeks ago when Tony was in China?

  • 4
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:48 am | Permalink

    For those interested, the Daily Telegraph’s Royal headlines this morning are:

    “Royals unwind at the Waratah match”

    “Is Kate dressing like a nanna?”

    “The Aussie designers Kate rejected”

    and, ever tasteful from our permanent Murdoch masterpiece of journalism…

    “How come Kate never wears baby vomit”

    Legendary work like this will no doubt endear (and adhere) another generation of Australians to the Royals, and clearly, the feeling will be mutual.

  • 5
    don
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:50 am | Permalink

    Bushfire Bill@2

    I use the word “guest” advisedly. Let’s just say he fell asleep and we couldn’t wake him up for long enough to get him to a bed.

    To amuse myself I counted,not sheep, but snores.

    25 breaths per minute – try it – is tantamount to panting speed. The guy mustn’t be getting all that much oxygen to be breathing – in his sleep – so rapidly.

    No wonder he’s always tired.

    I hope he’s getting medical treatment or at least diagnosis. Doesn’t sound good.

  • 6
    shellbell
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:53 am | Permalink

    Oops. Easter Bunny bought wrong kind of chocolate.

  • 7
    don
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:53 am | Permalink

    Bushfire Bill@3

    And what a prize at the end of it! Yet another casino. Just what Sydney needs. And on an ikonic, absolute Harbour frontage site, all without any serious oversight at all. Niiiiice!

    I’m all for casinos. It is a way of fleecing the rich. It’s the only tax some of them pay.

  • 8
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 6:56 am | Permalink

    At last someone else (in this case Jonathan Swan) of The Age has noticed one of the things I’ve been banging on about for the last two years.

    And jusging by the prominence given to the story, it looks like it’s front page material:

    The federal Coalition's cabinet is the most powerful collection of Catholics ever assembled in Australia, with almost half its 19 minister being members of that faith, nearly double the proportion of Catholics in the general population.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/gospel-truth-catholics-come-to-power-20140419-36y46.html#ixzz2zMrlfxsj

  • 9
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:01 am | Permalink

    Crikey whitey

    Let me say that I generally value your posts, and find little with which to disagree. Ironically, this means that I tend not to respond to them. I’ve never done an analysis but I’d be surprised if for every post I’ve written here supporting someone’s claims or adding to them, I’ve written three challenging another in some way. That’s often the way.

    Often, people here fail to respond to posts I regard as worth a comment, but that’s the chance one takes. You can never be sure how people will respond. Perhaps something else is engaging them. You shouldn’t take it personally. You write thoughtfully and from a humanistic perspective. That commends you.

    For the record, since you linked to the BOF matter on Friday, I’ve decided not to comment further on it, absent some significant new development shedding new light on the matter.

    One thing we all did miss yesterday was the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising of 1943.

    http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007745

    Let us salute their resistance to the Nazis, admire their courage and honour those who fought back as brothers and sisters striking blows for all of humanity.

  • 10
    poroti
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:04 am | Permalink

    don

    I’m all for casinos. It is a way of fleecing the rich.

    Problem is it is just another bunch of rich types fleecing other rich types.

  • 11
    A Good Lurk
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:06 am | Permalink

    In the adversarial world of politics, the game now – unfortunately – seems to be to convince the punters that something is to their advantage. Often, however, that is done to advantage the politician. Of course there are clear exceptions – like Julia Gillard – who really care about the future of the nation as a whole. Many politicians(probably most) are interested mainly in their own betterment.

    And that’s probably why last night’s discussion about “lying teachers” rather missed the point. The teacher’s aim is not to dissemble for his/her advantage; it is to encourage, to ‘leave the door ajar’, to show there is hope – even for a delinquent student.

    In other words, teaching is not a contest; it’s an art, and as such, not to be judged by the adversarial standards of politics or the law.

  • 12
    KEVIN-ONE-SEVEN
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:45 am | Permalink

    CRICKEY – Nobody reads anyone else’s comments on this blog. I certainly don’t. I only read my own, repeatedly, because I find them to be beautiful oases of reason and philosophical depth. It was only by the purest happenstance that I came across your demand for attention.

  • 13
    Everything
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:49 am | Permalink

    Obama’s approval was net -16.1 on the RCP average in December, Today it is -7.8. For the first time since Dec, his disapprove is below 50%. At this stage GWB was -19.3 (again, the diversion of these two graphs is since about Dec).

    Obamacare seems to have shifted sentiment in the USA, and it might actually be a net positive in November!

    Heavens, could the Democrats actually make gains in the House rather than just keep the Senate (as I predicted earlier)?????? Nobody seems to be predicting that…..but I think I just did:

    Democrats will win more votes than Republicans in the House elections
    Democrats will gain in the House (but Republicans keep it)
    Democrats will hold the Senate (just)

    These are way out there long-range predictions, and against every pundit I have seen so far (including Nate Silver), but it is just a hunch on what things will be like in 6 months time, the seeds of which appear to have been sown in December (when Obamacare was resuscitated and the exchanges started to actually function).

    Watch this space!

  • 14
    daretotread
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:54 am | Permalink

    Crikey

    I think you usually post quite late at night and I am often asleep.

    Mind you lots of my posts go totally unacknowledged.

    If you want response her say something outrageous or something nice about kevin.

    Sensible comments get no replies

  • 15
    Everything
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 7:58 am | Permalink

    We have been instructed by our fearless leader not to post “+1″.

    Most of us can’t be bothered posting “I agree with you”. Hence, the posts which garner a response are usually the ones we disagree with.

    Its a disagreeable blog mainly! :devil:

  • 16
    Everything
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:00 am | Permalink

    the first time since Dec, his disapprove is below 50%.

    “disapproval” and I should add “…..in the regular Gallup poll”*

    *which is skewed against Democrats given their estimation of voter makeup being too old and white.

  • 17
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:03 am | Permalink

    DTT

    Sensible comments get no replies

    Oh I don’t agree with that. There are many ‘sensible’ posts here that generate discussion.

  • 18
    BK
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:08 am | Permalink

    Good morning Dawn Patrollers. Apologies for being a bit late today – no excuses.
    How can schools like this deserve a single cent from the government?
    http://www.smh.com.au/national/education/elites-open-wallets-in-education-arms-race-20140419-36xnd.html
    And Baird hits the ground running with privatisations. Are we still wondering whether BOF was set up?
    http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/new-premier-mike-baird-shares-his-private-views-20140419-36xsy.html
    Jonathon Swan on the preponderance of Catholic influence in the federal cabinet. It’s a bit of a worry how unrepresentative of the total population that it is,
    http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/gospel-truth-catholics-come-to-power-20140419-36y46.html
    Mr Grecian 2000 is setting to pit doctors against doctors.
    http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/disability-pension-attack-20140419-36y2q.html
    A good Easter read from Richard Glover on the effects of boring theatre.
    http://www.smh.com.au/comment/theatre-its-just-a-stage-im-sleeping-through-20140416-36qd9.html
    Cathy Wilcox is back with a ripper!! It’s oh so true.
    http://www.smh.com.au/photogallery/federal-politics/cartoons/cathy-wilcox-20090909-fhd6.html
    And Ron Tandberg continues with Grange Hermitage.
    http://www.smh.com.au/photogallery/federal-politics/cartoons/ron-tandberg-20090910-fixc.html

  • 19
    BK
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:25 am | Permalink

    And from the Land of the Free -

    Labor needs someone like Elizabeth Warren to recover its leakage of left leaning votes to the Greens.
    http://thepoliticalcarnival.net/2014/04/19/elizabeth-warrens-growing-clout-shift-caucus-left/
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/18/elizabeth-warren-book_n_5175662.html
    Bill O’Reilly says it all in his Easter “sermon”. What a jerk!
    http://crooksandliars.com/2014/04/billo-gives-good-friday-sermon-moochers
    FoxNews bemoans the “Unholy War on Easter”.
    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/04/18/1292984/-Fox-News-warns-of-The-Unholy-War-on-Easter
    They get so touchy about religion don’t they!
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/18/atheist-license-plate_n_5175095.html?utm_hp_ref=politics

  • 20
    lizzie
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:27 am | Permalink

    An interesting examination of the life of Jacqui Lambie.
    A narrow range of interests, but a very feisty lady.

    The Senate that Australians elected last year was full of surprises and Jacqui Lambie, 43, ex-army corporal, single mother of two, broad Australian accent, was one. There's a new political class heading for Canberra. A handful of outsiders with burning grievances and little or no political experience are about to wield real power in the upper house.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/the-underdog-bites-back-20140414-36m7y.html#ixzz2zNFBAAgx

  • 21
    lizzie
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:30 am | Permalink

    Stop worrying, it’s stress, not dementia (but I still haven’t found my car keys).

    The key issue here is that the healthily ageing brain doesn't lose memories, they just take longer to retrieve.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/dementia-its-all-in-the-mind-20140419-36xoi.html#ixzz2zNFw8Knl

  • 22
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:35 am | Permalink

    A handful of outsiders with burning grievances and little or no political experience

    Sounds like any one of the Greens MPs currently in federal parliament, with the exception of Milne or Rhiannon.

  • 23
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:36 am | Permalink

    lizzie
    Some of my memories now take weeks to retrieve.

  • 24
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:37 am | Permalink

    Bushfire Bill:

    Not just News ltd, but even Fairfax is filled with William and Kate stories.

  • 25
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:38 am | Permalink

    Kelly reads straight from the Liberal script on O’Farrell.

    Apparently there is not the ‘faintest whiff’ of corruption in getting a gift of $3,000.

    Not the faintest?

    It stinks.

    A gift is a bribe is a gift is a bribe – even when it is not linked to a specific decision.

    You are buying the whole man, not a specific decision.

  • 26
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:39 am | Permalink

    What does Kate spend a year on maintaining her celeb clothes horse self?

  • 27
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:39 am | Permalink

    Hmm

    http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/strangers-stop-savage-dog-attack-with-sixpack-of-beer-20140419-36xbv.html

    This is a dreadful story, despite the comedic and classically (stereotypically?) Australian elements for those of us keen on doing the right thing by dogs.

    I’ve said it before here and I’ll say it again. We need urgent reform around the whole Companion Animal Act.

    In particular, we need

    a) an end to unlicenced breeders
    b) strict regulatory requirements in breeders including a lifetime re-agistment policy backed by a trust fund for those who go out of the business
    c) a ban on breeding dogs likely to exceed a given shoulder height plus body mass.
    d) a ban on the use of dogs in commercial private security
    e) a ban on sale of dogs, or the keeping of any dog for sale, other than as above and f) below plus a ban on completing any sale until a cooling off period of not less than 30 days has expired
    f) very strict rules on anyone (apart from a licenced animal refuge) keeping dogs above a certain body mass going to their housing and the fitness of people to handle them (skills and physical fitness) These people ought to pay a very substantial fee each year to underwrite at least annual plus randomised audits of their domiciles and the complaints, if any, of their neighbours
    g) requirement on all keeping dogs to undergo successfully an accredited course in caring for dogs.

    There are far too many maltreated dogs about and ending up in shelters and too many untrained and unfit owners keeping them.

  • 28
    lizzie
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:39 am | Permalink

    Boerwar

    Apparently that’s because your ageing brain is full of knowledge. ;)

  • 29
    lizzie
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:42 am | Permalink

    We should consider the relationship between Barry O’Farrell and Di Girolamo in the context of the widespread pattern of privileges dealt out to powerful insiders.

    *The concessions to James Packer without due process for his high-rollers casino at Barangaroo. There was no tender process and no genuine community consultation. A deal was fixed by lobbyists for the insiders
    *The banks and the financial advising industry through lobbying persuaded Arthur Sinodinis to skew the finance advising sector in their favour.
    *The Rudd Government was abysmal in its handling of the super profits tax for miners, but the Australian Mining Council and the big miners, for an investment of $22 million in advertising and lobbying saved the mining industry over $60 billion in tax over ten years. I don’t know that we have ever had a heist like this in our history.
    *The polluters and their lobbyists are successfully rolling back the penalties that they should be paying for the pollution that they put into the atmosphere. They are despoiling and violating our fragile planet.
    All political parties are at the beck and call of the alcohol and hotel lobby. It took months for the O’Farrell government to take action against alcohol-fuelled violence. *Right to the end O’Farrell was unwilling to make the trading hour changes that had been so successful in Newcastle. Alcohol sponsorship dominates our major sports. *We have a ‘war’ on illegal drugs but the alcohol industry causes much more damage than illegal drugs. But the alcohol industry prevents effective government action against the alcohol industry. And guess who is the Chief Executive of the NSW Hotels Association? It is Paul Nicolaou who was engaged by Australian Water Holdings as a lobbyist in 2007.At that time he was Chairman of the Millennium Forum, the NSW‘s Liberal Party’s major fund raising body.
    The gambling and clubs industry lobbying effectively stopped attempts to curb problem gambling.
    *The superannuation industry is relentless in its lobbying to defend the taxation concessions for superannuation which Treasury advise cost $ 32b p.a. These concessions massively favour the wealthy.
    *The health lobby – the AMA, the Pharmacy Guild of Australia, Medicines Australia and the Private Health Insurance industry oppose almost every government attempt to reduce wasteful health expenditures and improve efficiency. They are the rent seekers par excellence. The problem is not with Medicare. The problem is with the vested interests who exploit Medicare. The AMA opposes almost all attempts to modernize the 19th century work practices that are widespread in the health sector. The Pharmacy Guild is vehemently opposed to competition. Medicines Australia charges $2b more p a compared with what New Zealanders pay for the same medicines. And our PHI companies undermine Medicare and receive a $5b annual subsidy, far more than the auto industry received. The health lobby has all politicians at their beck and call.
    *Senator Nash survived as Assistant Minister for Health after it was revealed that she had ordered the Department of Health to take down its junk food rating website. We found out later that her former Chief of Staff had a shareholding in a firm that lobbied for junk food companies.

    Professor Ross Garnaut expressed his frustration about the powerful vested interests who are imperilling good policy development in Australia, particularly in the climate-change area. He described these lobbyists and vested interests as representing a ‘diabolical problem’. They are blocking the necessary but politically difficult paths of reform.

    http://johnmenadue.com/blog/?p=1544

  • 30
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:43 am | Permalink

    Kelly reckons that Baird signing of on Di Girolamo’s appointment to a $100,000 job is a ‘minor embarrassment’.

    Sure.

    What did Baird actually do?

    He appointed a democracy thief to a post on a body that was a target on the AWH vehicle for making a huge amount of money out of taxpayers for a seedy bunch of…

    This was after di G was involved in a selection process in which he was rated last in order of merit.

    Meh.

    When minor is a $3,000 ‘gift’ and appointing the ‘gift’ giver to a $100,000 position, what is ‘major’?

  • 31
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:44 am | Permalink

    Apparently there is not the ‘faintest whiff’ of corruption in getting a gift of $3,000.

    How then does Kelly explain the job offer not 2 weeks after the gift? Or is this just conveniently ignored?

  • 32
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:45 am | Permalink

    Is everubody looking forward to The Insiders declaring with nodding agreement that Barry got done, copped a bum rap and generally was a good bloke brought down by a Star Chamber?

    I am, in a perverse sort of way.

  • 33
    Everything
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    No, its not on today ….

  • 34
    lizzie
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    March 2014 was the 349th consecutive month (>29 years) of above average global temperatures.

  • 35
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:47 am | Permalink

    Fran

    Far more important issues abound:

    I’ve said it before here and I’ll say it again. We need urgent reform around the whole Human Marriage Act.

    In particular, we need

    a) an end to unlicenced breeders
    b) strict regulatory requirements in breeders including a lifetime re-agistment policy backed by a trust fund for those who go out of the business
    c) a ban on breeding humans likely to exceed a given shoulder height plus body mass.
    d) a ban on the use of humans in commercial private security
    e) a ban on sale of babies, or the keeping of any baby for sale, other than as above and f) below plus a ban on completing any sale until a cooling off period of not less than 30 days has expired
    f) very strict rules on anyone (apart from a licenced animal refuge) keeping babies above or below a certain body mass going to their housing and the fitness of people to handle them (skills and physical fitness) These people ought to pay a very substantial fee each year to underwrite at least annual plus randomised audits of their domiciles and the complaints, if any, of their neighbours
    g) requirement on all keeping babies to undergo successfully an accredited course in caring for babies.

    There are far too many maltreated humans about and ending up in shelters and too many untrained and unfit owners keeping them.

  • 36
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:49 am | Permalink

    There is no Insiders today.

  • 37
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:50 am | Permalink

    BW

    There are far too many maltreated humans about and ending up in shelters and too many untrained and unfit owners keeping them.

    I don’t disagree, putting aside the use of the word ‘owners’ here. We need to ensure that our rules underpin the concept of playing nicely with others.

  • 38
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:51 am | Permalink

    I feel deprived. I love it how The Insiders completely disabuse me of what I thought the context of a story should be and substitute the approved version. It’s so comforting.

  • 39
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:52 am | Permalink

    This is a good move IMO.

    Pressure is mounting on pharmacists to stop selling homeopathic products after a major review found there was no credible scientific evidence to support the alternative medicines.

    Despite scepticism about homeopathy among pharmacists, many pharmacies sell homeopathic products that are marketed for illnesses including migraine headaches, bleeding, persistent nausea and vomiting, coughs and colds, insomnia and arthritic pain.

    But there are now increasing calls for them to abandon the products after a major National Health and Medical Research Council review of homeopathy concluded there was no reliable evidence it could treat health conditions.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/call-to-get-homeopathic-remedies-off-pharmacy-shelves-20140419-36xlk.html#ixzz2zNLJK2mM

  • 40
    CTar1
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:52 am | Permalink

    I don’t think ‘Insiders’ is on this morning.

  • 41
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:52 am | Permalink

    lizzie

    OK. I am happy to go with finding it diffucult to find some long-embedded time-worn factoids hiding in the over-crowded garage mind of a sexuagenarian.

  • 42
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:53 am | Permalink

    Fran Kelly will be Insiders host when it returns next weekend. Not sure what Cassidy is doing, perhaps taking annual leave?

  • 43
    zoomster
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:54 am | Permalink

    fran

    yeah, but why (c)?

    I’ve NEVER heard of anyone being mauled by a Great Dane or a Newfoundland (that would require actual brain cells), whereas I have both heard of and know of several cases involving pit bulls, bull terriers (both quite compact animals) and small dogs like Aussie terriers (in our grocery delivery days, a common scene was a little old lady shrieking at my husband, “Don’t kick my dog, he doesn’t bite” and my husband saying, “I’m not kicking it, I’m trying to shake it off my leg..”)

    The strangest dog encounter I had was in Melbourne. I was walking down a deserted street (industrial area) and a Samoyed passed me. As it did, I felt a sudden sharp pain in my calf — it had turned around and bitten me from behind….then it just kept walking.

  • 44
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:57 am | Permalink

    Why shouldn’t people be allowed to buy homeopathic remedies if they want to and where they want to?

    No one is suggesting that pharmacies stop selling jelly beans.

  • 45
    zoomster
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    Boer

    It’s interesting how the whole beauty industry gets away with practices that would be condemned if they occured in any other context, and no one ever seems concerned.

  • 46
    AussieAchmed
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    Baird has stated that in hindsight the appointment of di Grilamo was not a good decision

    This hindsight epiphany occuring as he was elected Premier and questions being asked about his own links to AWH

  • 47
    daretotread
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 9:02 am | Permalink

    Lizzie

    I suspect you have lost your keys because you are tired. My spare set went missing for months. Finally they turned up at the back of the spice rack on the kitchen bench.

    Has any friend or assistant been in your house tidying up??

    If so blame them and not your brain. The keys will have been put somewhere by some well meaning person, or they have fallen down behind something that you very rarely (if ever move.

  • 48
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 9:06 am | Permalink

    Far better to discriminate by gender, by whether entire, and by breed, than by size.

    Eliminate unchained, unsexed, male pitbulls and you eliminate around 50% of bad bites in Australia.

    There are around 2 million dog bite incidents in the Philippines annually. The vast majority of those would be by small dogs, Great Danes, etc, being scarce in the Philippines.

    To add interest to the equation, a significant proportion of these dogs carry rabies. Thus the really dangerous dogs are strays which are far less likely to be vaccinated.

    A single hospital, San Lorenzo, treats between 300 and 1,000 dog bite victims a DAY.

  • 49
    confessions
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 9:06 am | Permalink

    Why shouldn’t people be allowed to buy homeopathic remedies if they want to and where they want to?

    Because having homeopathic crap in pharmacies gives it a credence it simply doesn’t warrant.

    I work with someone who truly believes in this nonsense. His reasoning? I bought it at the chemist, therefore it must work.

  • 50
    Boerwar
    Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014 at 9:08 am | Permalink

    c

    Because having homeopathic crap in pharmacies gives it a credence it simply doesn’t warrant.

    That is why I mentioned jelly beans.

    Plus, I rather like the idea that pharmacies sell a lot of placebo effect and this relies not on what people buy but what they truly believe about its efficacy.

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