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Seats of the week: Mayo and Sturt

After going through a lax period, Seat of the Week plays catch-up with a double-header featuring two Liberal seats in South Australia.

Mayo

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Based around the Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island, Mayo was created with the expansion of parliament in 1984 from territory which had mostly been covered by Barker, which was compensated for its losses by absorbing the Riverland from the abolished seat of Angas. All areas concerned are strongly conservative, with Labor never having held Mayo, Barker or Angas. It presently extends southwards from Kersbrook, 22 kilometres to the north-east of Adelaide, through Mount Barker and McLaren Vale to Goolwa at the mouth of the Murray River, and westwards to the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island.

Alexander Downer entered parliament as the seat’s inaugural member in 1984, his father Sir Alec Downer having been member for Angas from 1949 to 1963. The only threat to Downer’s hold on the seat over the next 24 years was the strength of the Australian Democrats in the Adelaide Hills, which became a live concern in 1998 when John Schumann, former lead singer of folk group Redgum (of “I Was Only Nineteen” fame), increased the Democrats vote from 12.4% to 22.4% to overtake the Labor candidate and fall 1.7% short of victory after the distribution of their preferences. The Democrats polled a more typical 14.8% in 2001, before collapsing to 1.8% in 2004. As well as bringing an end his 11-year career as Foreign Minister, the November 2007 election reduced Downer’s margin against Labor to single figures for the first time, following a swing of 6.5%. Downer stepped down from the front bench after the election defeat and announced his resignation from parliament the following July, initiating a by-election held in September.

The Liberal preselection was won by Jamie Briggs, who had worked in the Prime Minister’s Office as chief adviser on industrial relations, giving him a politically uncomfortable association with the unpopular WorkChoices policies. With the backing of Downer and John Howard, Briggs won the preselection vote in the seventh round by 157 to 111 over the party’s recently ousted state leader Iain Evans, who remains a senior figure in the state parliamentary party as member for Davenport. Among the preselection also-rans was housing mogul Bob Day, who reacted to his defeat by running as the candidate of Family First, for which he would eventually be elected a Senator in 2013. Labor did not contest the by-election, but Briggs was given a run for his money by Lynton Vonow of the Greens and independent Di Bell, a local anthropologist who had the backing of Nick Xenophon. With the Liberal vote falling from 51.1% to 41.3%, most of the non-Liberal vote split between the Greens (21.4%), Di Bell (16.3%) and Bob Day (11.4%). The distribution of preferences from Day and others left Vonow leading Bell 28.2% to 24.1% at the second-last count, with Briggs finishing 3.0% clear of Vonow after distribution of Bell’s preferences.

Briggs had no difficulties winning re-election in 2010, when he prevailed with a near-identical margin to Downer’s in 2007, or in 2010, when the margin returned to double-digit territory after a 5.2% swing. He won promotion to shadow parliamentary secretary in September 2012, emerging the beneficiary of the one minor reshuffle of the term occasioned by Senator Cory Bernardi’s resignation. After the 2013 election victory he was promoted to the outer ministry as Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development.

Sturt

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Christopher Pyne’s electorate of Sturt covers the inner eastern suburbs of Adelaide, including Payneham, Kensington, Tranmere and Skye east of the city, Klemzig, Campbelltown, Paradise and Highbury to the north, and Glenunga, Glen Osmond and Beaumont to the south. When created in 1949 it also covered northern Adelaide, which after 1955 formed the basis of the new electorate of Bonython (eventually to be abolished in 2004). The loss of this territory made Sturt notionally Liberal, prompting Labor member Norman Makin – who had gained Sturt from the Liberals at the 1954 election – to contest the new seat, which was very safe for Labor. Sturt has since been won by Labor only at the 1969 election, when a 15.0% swing secured a narrow victory for Norman Foster. South Australia bucked the national trend of the 1972 election in swinging slightly to the Liberals, enabling Ian Wilson to recover the seat he had lost at the previous election.

Wilson thereafter retained the seat by margins of between 2.0% and 10.3% until the 1993 election, when he was defeated for preselection by Christopher Pyne, a 25-year-old former staffer to Senator Amanda Vanstone. Pyne was already emerging as a powerbroker in the party’s moderate faction, and won promotion to shadow parliamentary secretary a year after entering parliament. However, he would have to wait until the Howard government’s final year in office to achieve ministerial rank, which was widely put down to his closeness to Peter Costello. Following the November 2007 election defeat he ran for the deputy leadership, finishing in third place with 18 votes behind Julie Bishop on 44 and Andrew Robb on 25. He served in high-profile positions on the opposition front bench over the next few years, first in justice and border protection under Brendan Nelson, then in education, apprenticeships and training under Malcolm Turnbull and Tony Abbott. In February 2009 he further gained the important role of manager of opposition business, to the chagrin of the party’s Right.

Pyne’s hold on Sturt came under serious threat at Labor’s electoral high-water mark in 2007 and 2010, his margin being cut on the former occasion from 6.8% to 0.9%. He did well on the latter to secure the seat with a swing of 2.5%, going against the trend of a statewide swing to Labor of 0.8%, and was safely re-elected with a further swing of 6.5% in 2013. Since the election of the Abbott government he has served as Education Minister and Leader of the House.

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  • 701
    Boerwar
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    Tim Wilson gets $40,000 worth of entitlements?

  • 702
    Centre
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

    I think every word and all the rules of grammar in the English language should be re-examined and fixed.

    Firstly, two words or more with a different meaning should not be spelt the same way.

    Take “dice” for example.

    Dice is actually plural can you believe it?

    The singular for dice is actually “die” yep, the same spelling as when you cark it?

    It’s a joke – it’s got to be a joke fair dinkum :lol:

  • 703
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

    tricot and zoomster

    I hesitate to join in this discussion as I was not at school in Australia, but for geometry theorems, we were given the problem and asked to work it out, then at the end of the class the “code” was given to us. So the brighter ones always understood the background.

    In English literature, we learned poems, Shakespeare, whatever, merely so that we could use quotations to illustrate points in our essays. Rote learning was never forced on us.

  • 704
    confessions
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

    Weirdest thing ever. I have slaters crawling out of my downlights and falling to their deaths on the floor. It’s been happening for several days now. I get up in the morning and have to vacuum up loads of dead slaters. Same if I go out and come home: a pile of dead slaters under each downlight.

  • 705
    CTar1
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

    Centre

    Dice is actually plural can you believe it?

    This one I do get – it always meant two.

    Others not so well.

  • 706
    Centre
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:45 pm | Permalink

    You can’t have dice (singular) and dices (plural), too logical :lol:

  • 707
    Diogenes
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

    Centre

    I was amazed to see they had increased the stakes money on the QE to $4.5M. That’s come out of nowhere. Are they trying to make in an Autumn Cox Plate?

    Is it Sydney v Melbourne rivalry gone nuts?

  • 708
    CTar1
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    ‘fess

    It’s called ‘Autumn’ in a dry climate. Clean out the vacuum cleaner and proceed.

  • 709
    Centre
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    I hear the words “roll the dice” but never “roll the die”?

    It’s a joke!

  • 710
    B.C.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    The problem with the Abbott Government isn’t just that it’s breaking promises – all Governments do that. The problem’s also with the promises it’s keeping (e.g. PPL, abolishing carbon pricing).

  • 711
    confessions
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    Tribute to Neville Wran by Rodney Cavalier.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-21/cavalier-nevilles-life-lived-in-good-measure/5401646

  • 712
    Bugler
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

    Centre,

    You could always speak a constructed langyage with perfect grammar like Esperento, or one with strict grammar like Icelandic or Mandarin. The key to English is its mish-mash of grammar.

  • 713
    confessions
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

    CTar:

    You’re probably right. It’s highly annoying though.

  • 714
    Centre
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

    Diogs

    Yes, it’s Sydney’s version of the Cox Plate.

    That’s worth $4m now more than the Slipper at $3.5m.

    They had another 2yo race last Sat worth $500k, that was a waste of dough :cool:

  • 715
    CTar1
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:51 pm | Permalink

    Centre

    I hear the words “roll the dice” but never “roll the die”?

    I’m a little ignorant on gambling.

    Is there a ‘game’ where you get to chuck only one?

  • 716
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:51 pm | Permalink

    “@abcgrandstand: Luke Versace has won the 2014 #StawellGift by the slimmest of margins. He’s picked up $40,000 for his troubles.”

    FunnyI have seen that amount somewhere before

  • 717
    badcat
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    Tricot

    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 1:03 pm | Permalink

    When you can actually fail some Year 12 subjects and still get a place in a Teachers’ College says it all I guess.

    It used to be said to be a ‘good’ teacher there were three prerequisites…..

    *Knowledge of subject matter
    *Ability to communicate
    *Sense of the ridiculous.

    ——————————————————

    Tricot – only can speak from personal experience – but I consider :

    *Ability to communicate

    to be #1 on my list

    I went to a tech school – not a high school – and got my qualifications at a Tech university ( Maths/Chem/Physics) and spent 20 years teaching at a Tech school and jumped ship one year before Jeff Kennet shut it down as could see the writing on the wall. I transferred to a local High School. and boy was I in for a shock – all the teachers could talk about was which University one went to – Melbourne you were #1 ….. Monash/Bundoora – you were scum ….me – well I was shunned as a ‘Techie’ ……

    I soon learned that the number of degrees one had after their name/University attended – meant Jack Shit as far as being a good teacher went. Most teachers at this new at the new school seemed to me to be over-educated idiots with 5 degrees but couldn’t tie their own shoelaces ….

    I was about the only teacher who used a blackboard – they handed out photocopied notes for everything including explanantions of how to do it and honestly most of my now fellow teachers seemed to have no idea of communicating with students of any quality let alone poor academic students.

    My years of teaching Tech kids ( labelled good with hands but no brains for learning ) stood me in good stead at learning to communicate with all sorts of tough techie kids.

    Funny, after 1st term there kids sent their parents to the school principal/coordinators asking for their kid to get into my Maths class ….

    Apologies for a bit of self indulgence ….

  • 718
    Centre
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

    Bugler

    Well, Esperento (perfect grammar) sounds good to me :neutral:

  • 719
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

    Bugler@686

    Bemused,


    We all know the sheer brilliance of Julia and how she could do no wrong.


    I think you’re being childish here. Zoomster, who generally supported Gillard over Rudd, criticised her at 588, and despite having a lot of respect for Gillard and haven’t shied away from saying so in the past have criticised her approach as education minister on this blog several times. I don’t know what some people’s obsession with putting words in people mouths for the sake of something so petty. Anyway, it’s in the past so we can askew the personalities of the past and focus of the policies they put in that affect the future. That I’m happy to debate.

    Read my full post and what I was responding to.

  • 720
    zoidlord
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/state-politics/campbell-newman-man-jon-grayson-to-keep-stake-in-eddie-obeid-firm/story-e6frgczx-1226890797237

    So why isn’t this plasted all over the news?

  • 721
    Centre
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

    CTar

    Board games, surely?

  • 722
    CTar1
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    ‘fess

    It’s highly annoying though.

    Houses in Canberra built on concrete slabs suffer from them.

    It’s the winter coming on and seeking warmth.

    Here the Gecko’s chase them.

    I’ve almost perfected the capturing of the Gecko’s in a glass and putting them back out in the garden.

  • 723
    Tom the first and best
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:03 pm | Permalink

    692

    Grammar innate?

    I don`t think so.

    If grammar was innate, then it would not differ from language to language and there would not be so many mistakes made by people who have not been taught grammar properly.

  • 724
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

    TTFAB

    I agree it’s not innate. We learn by imitation, surely. If a parent or teacher speaks ungrammatically, that’s what we learn.

  • 725
    confessions
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:09 pm | Permalink

    CTar:

    Perhaps I’ll have to go find me some geckos then!

  • 726
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

    Tom

    I’ll bet you were speaking grammatically correct sentences long before you went to school…even though most adults were talking to you ungrammatically (given our propensity to address children in baby talk).

    Of course, I was using shorthand – given it was an aside – but the very fact that all languages have concepts of correct and incorrect grammar indicates that all human groups have the need to create rules about language structure (after all, there is nothing wrong with “Me Tarzan” – it conveys exactly the same message as “I am Tarzan.” It’s just not grammatically correct…)

    To put it more correctly, we are wired to be very sensitive about the ‘correct’ way of constructing sentences and thus can obey the rules of grammar before we’re even pronouncing words properly or have more than a minimal vocabulary.

    And that’s what I mean by ‘innate’ – we have an innate need to structure our language in a certain way, even when it has little effect on others’ ability to understand what we’re saying, and pick up the rules of language structure even when they’re constantly being broken in our presence.

  • 727
    CTar1
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:15 pm | Permalink

    Centre

    Board games, surely?

    You’re right.

    I once played a night of ‘Trivial Pursuit’ where one ‘Turkey’ turned up with two bottles of Bin 707. Everyone else had cheapo’s.

    A mate and I did over the Penfold’s while the mate played ‘waiter’ and fed the rest on the crap (and help blitz them on the game as well) – like who doesn’t know who Roald Engelbregt Gravning Amundsen was?

    They were all people who worked for Foreign Affairs or Trade.

    FM.

  • 728
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    fess

    Woodlice (slaters) can also invade homes en masse in search of moisture and their presence can indicate dampness problems. However, they are not generally regarded as a serious household pest as they do not spread disease and do not damage wood or structures.

    Is your water heating in the roof space? Could it be leaking?

  • 729
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    bemused

    Read my full post and what I was responding to.

    Meh. You were just using a mention of Gillard to trot out your usual Gillard-hate. Followed by the stoopid evil laugh emoticon. As if that excuses your stoopidity.

    Get over it.

  • 730
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:22 pm | Permalink

    lizzie

    ah, but our ideas about who is using grammar correctly or not are (largely) class orientated – in the same way pronounciation is.

    An adult who is speaking ungrammatically will (generally) be consistent in their errors – that is, they’re still applying rules to their grammar, just not the ‘correct’ ones.

    As I pointed out, there’s not much wrong with “Me Tarzan’. It conveys the meaning intended. If Tarzan then consistently says “Me Tarzan. You Jane. They people.” he is obeying the rules of grammar, even if they’re the ‘wrong’ rules.

    It’s highly unlikely that Tarzan would say, “Me Tarzan. You is Jane. They are peoples.” or “Me Tarzan. You are Jane. They is people.” — he would use tense etc consistently, even if wrongly.

    So the child who imitates their parent’s bad grammar will apply the rules of that bad grammar consistently.

    It’s that need to structure language according to rules which constitutes ‘grammar’ — after all, in all the Tarzan examples I gave above, his use of grammar did not mean you didn’t understand what he was trying to say.

  • 731
    confessions
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

    kezza:

    Thanks, but no, the water heating isn’t in the roof space. And there’s no damp issue that’s obvious anyways.

  • 732
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

    fess

    Given that south-western WA has had so little rainfall.

  • 733
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    Oh please let this be true. Let’s have a fight!

    7NewsBrisbane 1h
    Clive Palmer has indicated his party won't support the Abbott government's climate change direct action plan | http://yhoo.it/1njnLQL

  • 734
    taylormade
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    Steve777 – 683

    So Gillard breaking her promise to Wilkie = changed circumstances ??

  • 735
    don
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    Tom the first and best@723

    692

    Grammar innate?

    I don`t think so.

    If grammar was innate, then it would not differ from language to language and there would not be so many mistakes made by people who have not been taught grammar properly.

    I think poor grammar occurs when people do not read widely as they are growing up.

    You absorb the grammar, you don’t actually apply the rules, you say what seems natural. If you read good writers, it comes naturally. Same with spelling.

    If you see the word spelled correctly often enough, it is difficult to spell it wrongly.

    But wrong pronunciation often occurs with voracious readers when they have never heard an unusual word pronounced in real life.

    Like hyperbole as hyperbowl. Or, in a well read person I know well, misled was pronounced mizled (migh – zeld)

  • 736
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:28 pm | Permalink

    lizzie

    The worry is that Palmer will vote to repeal the ‘carbon tax’ but vote against any other form of action on climate change.

    So the question is whether or not ‘Direct Action’ is better than no action at all.

  • 737
    confessions
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    kezza:

    True.

  • 738
    Tom the first and best
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    735

    I agree. Not teaching grammar discriminates against people who have has less access to language (people from disadvantaged backgrounds).

  • 739
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:30 pm | Permalink

    zoomster

    (I knew I should never try to argue with you. :o )

    I’d say “innate” is the search for meaning in communication, which leads to the necessity to get words in correct sequence for the listener. Those African Grey parrots and the monkeys (can’t remember which species) who learned to communicate “Polly wants biscuit” or whatever it was, learned not to say “Biscuit wants Polly”.

    I don’t speak German, or other languages that depend on order and gender, so I’d be interested in comments from someone who does.

    I agree that “correct language” is cultural.

  • 740
    CTar1
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    don – Grammar innate from reading?

    I think not.

    Depends on reading speed. Not a thing that I recall teachers ‘liking’.

    Skip Readers considered as …

  • 741
    lizzie
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    zoomster

    In my view, Direct Action will cost money, benefit those who can rort the system, and do nothing for climate . So I hope it disappears up Hunt’s fundamental orifice.

  • 742
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    don

    I pronounced ‘naive’ ‘nave’ for years. My mother couldn’t believe it when I said I hadn’t heard it pronounced – but of course, when I did, I didn’t associate it with the word I knew.

    I had a large vocab when I went to Uni but shocking pronounciation – I had a friend who took it upon himself to help me work it out.

    My son often has the same problem – at twenty, he’s still pointing to words in books and asking me how they should be pronounced.

  • 743
    guytaur
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    zoomster and lizzie

    Easy. Make a Green Labor repeal motion. One where the “tax” is repealed but not the ETS.

    The Greens would probably go along with that given the alternative.

    Palmer and Abbott would be hamstrung because specifically ruling out tax in the legislation just leaves a debate on the best way to tackle climate change.

    The answer of course is an ETS. Abbott loses.

  • 744
    Jackol
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Zoomster -

    So the question is whether or not ‘Direct Action’ is better than no action at all.

    Yes it is an interesting question.

    I’m assuming that the ALP have to vote against Direct Action if they are planning on reintroducing a carbon price, and the Greens presumably won’t see merit in the overall package – there might be a few things to cherrypick out of Direct Action, but I can’t imagine the government agreeing to any amendments to let through stuff the Greens might like.

    The new crossbench will be all over the place … the likelihood of PUP + 2 or 3 others (or however many are required) lining up to vote through Direct Action seems very low unless the government really negotiates hard to get it through.

    So scrapping the carbon price and then failing to get Direct Action up would seem to be a likely outcome.

    And you’d have to think Abbott and Minchin and various others wouldn’t be sad about that.

  • 745
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    Interesting teacher discussion.

    My teacher sister, a June baby, was born in 1951, and started school when she was 4-and-a-half. She failed her leaving certificate first time round (the examiners lost most of the history papers, for some reason, something to do with a boat!) and she repeated what is now denoted Year 11.

    The following year (after she would have matriculated had the papers not been lost) she began teacher training, at the age of 17-and-a-half.

    She didn’t go to a teacher training college. She began teaching prep and grade 1 on the job. This was in the Catholic system. There was never anyone more suited to a teaching career. She loves kids, has their best interests at heart, and has only missed teaching since then when giving birth to her own six kids. No PPL by the way.

    She’s still teaching. By a quirk of Labor policy, she can’t retire until she’s 65, until 2016. She’s very tired, very worn out, but still puts her heart and soul into the job.

    The only arguments we have is about religion – and brainwashing kids. I won’t say more about that except to say she’s sitting on the fence there.

    Her husband over the years has had various illnesses. She has 18 grandkids. And on any day of the week also has at least one or two of them.

    Some people are cut out for it. Some aren’t.

    Like zoomster, my sister is always approached by former students who appreciated her as a teacher. And who can laugh and joke peer-to-peer about their times.

    That’s a fundamental measure of success as a teacher. The ability for student-teacher to become contemporaries. Rather than a continuing imbalance in the power relationship.

  • 746
    Player One
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    taylormade@734

    Steve777 – 683

    So Gillard breaking her promise to Wilkie = changed circumstances ??

    Yes. Wilkie turned out to be a fruitloop.

  • 747
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    Tom

    as I’ve pointed out ‘correct grammar’ is a class thing. Like spelling, what is ‘correct’ or not is a product of the need for consistency in printed material.

    A certain form of English has been accepted as ‘correct’ – despite the fact that there was, at one stage, many, many different versions of English, with slightly different grammatical usage. (One writer in the 1600s said that, only a few miles out of London, the English used was so different that he had trouble understanding what was being said).

    Very few people actually understand the rules of grammar, yet the vast majority speak and write perfectly well…which indicates, again, that we don’t need to learn the rules to work grammar out (whereas with spelling, which is genuinely an imposed system, even well educated people often have difficulty, even when they have learnt the rules).

  • 748
    deewhytony
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    Don’t know if anyone has already commented -

    A most dignified front page on the Daily Telegraph today, stating “Wran Dead”, with most dignified full page photograph in funerary black and white.

    Good enough for Murdoch, eh Tones!

  • 749
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:43 pm | Permalink

    Oh please let this be true. Let’s have a fight!

    7NewsBrisbane 1h
    Clive Palmer has indicated his party won't support the Abbott government's climate change direct action plan | http://yhoo.it/1njnLQL

    That would be Abbott’s dream result.

    Palmer is an out-and-out Anthropomorphic Climate Change denier.

    I was actually quite shocked when I saw him up against Garnaut on Lateline recently. He’s got his head buried in the sand on Global Warming. Thinks it’s caused by “nature”, or (wtte) “natural forces”, with only 3% man-made.

    If he votes to repeal the Carbon Tax and then votes against Direct Action, Abbott can say, with that smarmy smile on his face, “At least I tried.”

  • 750
    Player One
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 3:44 pm | Permalink

    Jackol@744

    Zoomster -

    So scrapping the carbon price and then failing to get Direct Action up would seem to be a likely outcome.

    It’s better to have nothing than have “Direct Action”. I agree with Palmer that this policy is just a ridiculous waste of money.

    Abbott will be gone at the next election, and we can use the money saved to put something useful in place instead.

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