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Seats of the week: Mayo and Sturt

After going through a lax period, Seat of the Week plays catch-up with a double-header featuring two Liberal seats in South Australia.

Mayo

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Based around the Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island, Mayo was created with the expansion of parliament in 1984 from territory which had mostly been covered by Barker, which was compensated for its losses by absorbing the Riverland from the abolished seat of Angas. All areas concerned are strongly conservative, with Labor never having held Mayo, Barker or Angas. It presently extends southwards from Kersbrook, 22 kilometres to the north-east of Adelaide, through Mount Barker and McLaren Vale to Goolwa at the mouth of the Murray River, and westwards to the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island.

Alexander Downer entered parliament as the seat’s inaugural member in 1984, his father Sir Alec Downer having been member for Angas from 1949 to 1963. The only threat to Downer’s hold on the seat over the next 24 years was the strength of the Australian Democrats in the Adelaide Hills, which became a live concern in 1998 when John Schumann, former lead singer of folk group Redgum (of “I Was Only Nineteen” fame), increased the Democrats vote from 12.4% to 22.4% to overtake the Labor candidate and fall 1.7% short of victory after the distribution of their preferences. The Democrats polled a more typical 14.8% in 2001, before collapsing to 1.8% in 2004. As well as bringing an end his 11-year career as Foreign Minister, the November 2007 election reduced Downer’s margin against Labor to single figures for the first time, following a swing of 6.5%. Downer stepped down from the front bench after the election defeat and announced his resignation from parliament the following July, initiating a by-election held in September.

The Liberal preselection was won by Jamie Briggs, who had worked in the Prime Minister’s Office as chief adviser on industrial relations, giving him a politically uncomfortable association with the unpopular WorkChoices policies. With the backing of Downer and John Howard, Briggs won the preselection vote in the seventh round by 157 to 111 over the party’s recently ousted state leader Iain Evans, who remains a senior figure in the state parliamentary party as member for Davenport. Among the preselection also-rans was housing mogul Bob Day, who reacted to his defeat by running as the candidate of Family First, for which he would eventually be elected a Senator in 2013. Labor did not contest the by-election, but Briggs was given a run for his money by Lynton Vonow of the Greens and independent Di Bell, a local anthropologist who had the backing of Nick Xenophon. With the Liberal vote falling from 51.1% to 41.3%, most of the non-Liberal vote split between the Greens (21.4%), Di Bell (16.3%) and Bob Day (11.4%). The distribution of preferences from Day and others left Vonow leading Bell 28.2% to 24.1% at the second-last count, with Briggs finishing 3.0% clear of Vonow after distribution of Bell’s preferences.

Briggs had no difficulties winning re-election in 2010, when he prevailed with a near-identical margin to Downer’s in 2007, or in 2010, when the margin returned to double-digit territory after a 5.2% swing. He won promotion to shadow parliamentary secretary in September 2012, emerging the beneficiary of the one minor reshuffle of the term occasioned by Senator Cory Bernardi’s resignation. After the 2013 election victory he was promoted to the outer ministry as Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development.

Sturt

Blue and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for Liberal and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Christopher Pyne’s electorate of Sturt covers the inner eastern suburbs of Adelaide, including Payneham, Kensington, Tranmere and Skye east of the city, Klemzig, Campbelltown, Paradise and Highbury to the north, and Glenunga, Glen Osmond and Beaumont to the south. When created in 1949 it also covered northern Adelaide, which after 1955 formed the basis of the new electorate of Bonython (eventually to be abolished in 2004). The loss of this territory made Sturt notionally Liberal, prompting Labor member Norman Makin – who had gained Sturt from the Liberals at the 1954 election – to contest the new seat, which was very safe for Labor. Sturt has since been won by Labor only at the 1969 election, when a 15.0% swing secured a narrow victory for Norman Foster. South Australia bucked the national trend of the 1972 election in swinging slightly to the Liberals, enabling Ian Wilson to recover the seat he had lost at the previous election.

Wilson thereafter retained the seat by margins of between 2.0% and 10.3% until the 1993 election, when he was defeated for preselection by Christopher Pyne, a 25-year-old former staffer to Senator Amanda Vanstone. Pyne was already emerging as a powerbroker in the party’s moderate faction, and won promotion to shadow parliamentary secretary a year after entering parliament. However, he would have to wait until the Howard government’s final year in office to achieve ministerial rank, which was widely put down to his closeness to Peter Costello. Following the November 2007 election defeat he ran for the deputy leadership, finishing in third place with 18 votes behind Julie Bishop on 44 and Andrew Robb on 25. He served in high-profile positions on the opposition front bench over the next few years, first in justice and border protection under Brendan Nelson, then in education, apprenticeships and training under Malcolm Turnbull and Tony Abbott. In February 2009 he further gained the important role of manager of opposition business, to the chagrin of the party’s Right.

Pyne’s hold on Sturt came under serious threat at Labor’s electoral high-water mark in 2007 and 2010, his margin being cut on the former occasion from 6.8% to 0.9%. He did well on the latter to secure the seat with a swing of 2.5%, going against the trend of a statewide swing to Labor of 0.8%, and was safely re-elected with a further swing of 6.5% in 2013. Since the election of the Abbott government he has served as Education Minister and Leader of the House.

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  • 951
    sprocket_
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:14 pm | Permalink

    Bob Carr on Neville Wran

    He gave a lot away in a talk when I was stumbling in my first years as Premier. We stood in the sun at Greenwich to witness harbourside land being handed over for public park, one of his pet enthusiasms. He looked at the crowd and gave me advice: “They’re all happy … that’s the secret. Just give them what they want – it’s easy.” Later he said “Think about that day at Greenwich. Sure they’re never satisfied but who cares? Forget the budget, just spread bread on the waters.”
    “Spread bread” was pure Wran.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/bob-carr-the-neville-wran-i-knew-20140421-zqxff.html#ixzz2zWCez8PI

  • 952
    Sir Pajama Pudding of Lake Disappointment
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:16 pm | Permalink

    Regarding language contortions, I mourn the word “without”.
    I prefer my subway roll without sauce, not “with no sauce”.

    I still have difficulty with “hey” replacing hello/hi, not to mention the use of “guys” to describe a mixed-gender group of people.

    To me, “hey” is jolting because of the traditional usage to interrupt and call/demand attention: “Hey, watch out!”, not as a generic greeting.

    It feels pedantic to object, but the above changes are just dumb.

  • 953
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:18 pm | Permalink

    fredex@908

    bemused? briefly?

    I seem to recall one of you, maybe both, saying you liked Joan Robinson.

    So you [lovely word, its both singular and plural] might appreciate this.
    http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2014/04/robinson-introduction-modern-economics.html

    Its a ‘review’ of Robinson’s 1973 work and is introduced thus:
    “For Robinson, rebuilding modern economics teaching meant starting with an understanding of evolving economic doctrines. As such, she begins her revolutionary textbook with a summary of the defining battles within economic philosophy …”

    Interesting site and I liked the comment of a bloke named Hugh which includes this gem:
    “Modern economics is essentially a con”.

    Not sure about briefly or anyone else, but I am certainly a fan of hers.

  • 954
    NathanA
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:24 pm | Permalink

    Bugler 689

    Recently we had an Upper House inquiry into greyhound racing in NSW, and I was pretty surprised with some of the things made public. GRV manages to rehome 350-odd greyhounds each year, by comparison GRNSW manages just 50, which is truly disgraceful. The retired greyhound trust in Great Britain manages nearly 4 500, which is part-funded, but not controlled by the industry, I believe.

    I personally don’t think that GRNSW or GRV should be responsible for animal welfare (and I agree with many others that GRV is getting better). If we’re going to bet on greyhound races, and I do, money should be taken directly from the TAB/bookmakers and given to a separate body primarily concerned for the welfare of the greyhound.

    The report is here, if you’re interested, and if you search “Nathan Absalom” in the pdf you’ll see where my submission has been read, and ultimately ignored. But that’s democracy I suppose.

    http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Prod/Parlment/committee.nsf/0/bec9a7d9384a2057ca257ca90002b4c0/$FILE/Greyhound%20Racing%20in%20New%20South%20Wales%20-%20First%20Report.pdf

  • 955
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:38 pm | Permalink

    This guy asked a question in the last QandA!

  • 956
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:39 pm | Permalink

    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:34 pm | PERMALINK
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    mexicanbeemer
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:12 pm | PERMALINK
    Kezza2 Maybe the ALP just need to restructure ts voting block to give each union 1% then divide the remaining voting block between the states based on memberships.

    This would honor both the ALP’s historical relation and give members more of a say in its voting

    Maybe they can. Good luck to them. I won’t be part of it.

    You know, we had a good PM. She did a good job. But those bastards who’d got where they were by swinging on union coat-tails, refused to back her.

    Sure, she did a deal with the Indies and the Greens to get an ETS off the ground. In collaboration with members of Labor

    None of the males in the party, who weren’t included in the initial negotiations, supported her.

    She did a deal with Wilkie, with Jennie Macklin, and none of the males in the party, who weren’t involved in the initial negotiations, supported her.

    They had their noses out of joint. All they did was suck up to a non-union person, to get a male back in the job, to get rid of the best PM we ever had.

    They nearly lost me then. But I had one more go at supporting the party. I spent a long, and windy, Saturday, in September 2013 handing out HTVs for my local member, I didn’t support the PM, but the Labor heirarchy didn’t have the balls to man-up to the Libs.

    They still suckered every opportunity. They got rid of very successful Labor programs. They called Gonski something else (even though Gonski resonated with the public), they called NDIS something else (even though NDIS resonated with the public).

    They trashed Gillard’s legacy as much as the Libs did. And they were Labor.

    Rudd was just as bad as Abbott. Couldn’t bear the signature of Gillard on anything.

    Even in WA, in the senate election, just gone, they squandered votes by not being united, by not telling the electorate that way it is in terms of MRRT and ETS. They squibbed it.

    If an electorate can’t bear any sort of news, for their own good, or for the nation’s good, but just need to be molly-coddled, then we’ve no reason to be there.

    For fuck’s sake, the eastern states supported SA and WA and NT for over 100 years. WA finally started earning its keep in 2001. Why can’t that be told. Instead of trying to appease a population that had never done anything for the nation.

    The blokes in the party are piss-weak. They don’t stand up for women in leadership, and the won’t give up their own sexism.

    Vale Labor.

  • 957
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:44 pm | Permalink

    I agree NathanA.
    Unlike some in animal welfare, I am not against the racing of animals as long as it is humane, risk reduced (nothing is risk-free), monitored and provision is made from betting monies for retirement of ex-racing animals.

    Also breeding should be controlled to limit the numbers bred in the hope of getting one in the top 1%. Greyhounds especially are vastly over-produced and over-disposed of, udsually by euthanasia, in this country.

    The national and state racing clubs need to take control, or if they won’t, it should be done by law.

  • 958
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

    Kezza
    That I agree with. And if Labor is to rise again, it will be on the work of women, and they had better treat them much better next time around. I have my eye out for the next female PM (who will not be a Lib, not in a hundred years) but I do not know if the sexism of the die-hards in the party will allow it in my lifetime.

  • 959
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

    I mean Labor Party.

  • 960
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:52 pm | Permalink

    I don’t have Crikey Whitey’s phone number. If anyone does, please give her a call to see if she is okay. Not being dramatic or anything but if i had her number I would call and say hello.

  • 961
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:52 pm | Permalink

    I did send her an email.

  • 962
    Wakefield
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 9:56 pm | Permalink

    Good match between AFL 1 and 2 today(Geelong and Hawthorn). Same again next week with Geelong and Port Adelaide 1 and 2. Should be a good match. Interesting – if this is a close result and Port wins, Hawthorn could go back to top with a good win over Richmond.

  • 963
    Edwina StJohn
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:00 pm | Permalink

    Deblonay’s probably wet himself with excitement at tonights Q&A and the “discussion” about Israel.

  • 964
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:01 pm | Permalink

    Puff

    Labor can buzz off as far as I’m concerned. I’ve worked too long and too hard for it to be side-lined like this.

    You know, women have made up more than half the population of this country since not long long after invasion, or settlement, if you like.

    And yet, in all that time, and especially since 1901, we have had one female PM in 109 years.

    That means, to spell it out for the male of the species, women have been subjected to the rule of a male, for most of that time.

    And you couldn’t bear having a woman, who represented more than 50% of the population governing for a mere 3 years.

    Yet she did more in that 3 years than any other government before her. She enacted more legislation than any other male, she introduced more progressive policies than any other male. Worse, she got them passed in a very hostile environment.

    And she was sabotaged at nearly every turn by her own party. Sure she was massacred by the opposition, that was par for the course.

    But Labor chose to crucify their own female leader because the big guns in every other institution couldn’t handle it. And caved in at every hurdle. Because they wanted, as men, power for their own sake.

    That’s the legacy they’re left with.

    No integrity.

  • 965
    zoomster
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:05 pm | Permalink

    kezza

    I’m not sure women leaving the party is the way to solve that problem, though…

  • 966
    Bugler
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

    NathanA,

    Thanks. Your submissions look pretty commonsense, so it’s disappointing they were ignored. The main problem I’ve been made aware of is overbreeding of greyhounds (perhaps why they’re more genetically robust than most pure-breeds) Howver, unlike you, I’m no authority on the topic, not being a gambler (family history with the horses, best to avoid) and neither of our dogs being former racers, I only really go on a little research I’ve done and the comments of other greyhound owners, many of which have raced their dogs. There’s actually a facebook group which generally has a wide range of views on various topics. Thanks for your informative comments though

  • 967
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:08 pm | Permalink

    zoomster

    I’m not sure women leaving the party is the way to solve that problem, though…

    Well, they should have thought of that.

    As they say, sorry luv . . .

  • 968
    Bugler
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:10 pm | Permalink

    Enjoy the night-shift, folks. I’m off

  • 969
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:13 pm | Permalink

    kezza2@948

    Sorry, to me, Labor IS the party of unions.

    If you don’t want union involvement then make another party.

    Sure, Bullock is a terrible rep. That’s to do with the other unionists who make deals with them. They know the calibre of the person, even if we don’t.

    And so do the leaderhip of the Labor Party.

    So, if Shorten wants to give the union movement short shrift, then start his own party. He can’t claim leadership of Labor and then cut most of the supporters loose.

    You just listen to the shit of the likes of bemused, who continues to can Gillard for instance, and who supported a non-union PM like Rudd, and who has never belonged to a union, to see how far Labor is removed from its roots.

    And who continues to make create divisions within Labor supporters.

    Well, okay, bemused and others of your ilk, run with it. I won’t support Labor any longer.

    Thinking back, I recall I was a member of a union when I worked for Telecom Australia many years ago. In all other jobs there was no union covering me or I would have joined. So what?

    The problem with the ALP is not that it has former union officials in parliament, but that it has too few from other backgrounds. The gene pool has narrowed way too much.

    If you think political success can be based on 18% of the workforce and their families then good luck to you. You are irrelevant.

  • 970
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:17 pm | Permalink

    kezza2@956
    Your Gillard grief is embarrassing.

    Have you considered therapy?

  • 971
    Tom the first and best
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:19 pm | Permalink

    969

    The unions do need to increase the proportion of the workforce they represent. The people who would never joint a union are also very disproportionately Liberal voting and those who are members of unions are disproportionately ALP voters (especially on a 2PP basis).

    Having said that, I am a bit suspicious of non-individual membership of political parties.

  • 972
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:21 pm | Permalink

    kezza2@967

    zoomster


    I’m not sure women leaving the party is the way to solve that problem, though…


    Well, they should have thought of that.

    As they say, sorry luv . . .

    I have voted for female candidates and campaigned damned hard for them.
    I have also supported women for pre-selection against men.

    Get over your stupid misandry.

  • 973
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:24 pm | Permalink

    Gillard made multiple mistakes, the people who voted for her decided that she was a schmuck.

    It wasn’t her gender, it was her decisions.

  • 974
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:29 pm | Permalink

    Mad Lib@973

    Gillard made multiple mistakes, the people who voted for her decided that she was a schmuck.

    It wasn’t her gender, it was her decisions.

    One of the few sensible comments Mad Lib has ever made on here.

    But more than her decisions, she was a poor politician and incapable of selling her policies and decisions.

  • 975
    Tom the first and best
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:29 pm | Permalink

    973

    It was Gillard`s inability to sell anything and the mainstream media`s war on her Government (especially Rupert`s papers).

  • 976
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:32 pm | Permalink

    Selling:
    1. People’s climate change forum
    2. Putting CPRS on hold
    3. East Timor solution
    4. Pacific solution
    5. Turning back boats
    6. We will deliver a surplus
    7. I promise Wilkie gambling legislation
    8. Assange is guilty

    etc etc

    These weren’t bad sells, these were dumb decisions. They couldn’t be sold.

  • 977
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:32 pm | Permalink

    bemused

    I don’t want to belong to a party that has you as a member. Simple as that.

    You sat there and sniped at Gillard throughout her PMship.

    I didn’t like Rudd, at all, I thought he was a simpering idiot, to be frank, but I didn’t say a word against him until he was usurped. By the caucus. Not.One.Thing.

    But that’s not all. You belong to a electoral membership where one of the party stalwarts actively worked against Gillard, namely Alan Griffiths.

    Rather than stick up for her within your own electorate, you rushed in behind Griffiths. And backed him. You did nothing to support Gillard. Or Labor for that matter.

    You knew what had happened. That the Cabinet had lost faith in him, as had the caucus. As shown by the fact that he didn’t even stand against her, in June 2010. You knew. But you didn’t even tell your rep that, given the circumstances, Gillard needed to be supported.

    You carry on about a Faulkner/Bracks report on the 2010 election where it was said that maybe they shouldn’t have gone with Gillard, but you never mention the fact that they also said they would have lost with Rudd. Because he was going nowhere.

    But, you threw your support behind Griffiths, and therefore Rudd. And once you’d done that, you then threw your weight behind a conceited and concerted campaign against her, publicly.

    And, you still won’t give up. That’s why I’m speaking today. I’m sick of listening to your shit about Gillard. She was a good PM. Sure, she made mistakes, just like Whitlam and Hawke did. And she would have gone on to bigger and better things if only the likes of you had told your rep to get stuffed.

    But you didn’t. You liked the idea of bringing her down. And you encouraged him, instead of telling him that it was a really good time to have a female PM.

    Because you couldn’t handle being told what to do by a woman, just as most of the blokes in any electorate can’t handle.

    It doesn’t occur to you that women don’t like being told to do by a man, but we’re used to compromise, you aren’t. And you weren’t prepared to do that, for the sake of the party, when there was an inkling of opportunity to get rid of it.

    And that’s what you did. And you feel good about it. Really good about it. Diddums that Labor lost the 2013 election. At least you helped the LNP get rid of a woman. And returned the world to its rightful position.

    It’s dickheads like you who lost Labor victory in 2013. You should hang your head in shame, except you think you won.

    Yeah, well, enjoy your victory. You have lost a lot of female support.

    Not because Gillard lost her job fair and square, but because men in her own party got rid of her.

    Women are more than 50% of the population. We are not irrelevant. Think on that.

  • 978
    Just Me
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:35 pm | Permalink

    632
    Helen Sykes

    There is a terrible littleness and a meanness in Tony Abbott that we’ve not seen in any of our previous leaders.

    And his main act is yet to start.

    budget + new senate = The Real Tones

    The Howard years are looking increasingly rosy.

  • 979
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:37 pm | Permalink

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=cH6EfGBKrbY

    …a little clip of Gillard’s bloopers for your entertainment! :devil:

  • 980
    NathanA
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:40 pm | Permalink

    Ah yes, the overbreeding issue. Again, it depends on which State you’re in. Somewhat of a surprise to me, there are significant differences in the numbers of greyhounds that reach adulthood in different states. In NSW 75% are named, in Victoria it is 55%. It’s basically one more dog per litter makes it to the track in NSW compared to Victoria.

    http://vicmps.greens.org.au/content/q-9013-racing-greyhound-racing-victoria-%E2%80%94-animal-welfare

    http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/lc/qalc.nsf/6b9957d2cbad5bd8ca25700b00232203/58a60367046f09b3ca257abc0029aa66?OpenDocument

    I suspect this is because there are larger numbers of people in NSW that breed, own and train their own dogs compared to Victoria, but I really don’t know why this is. If overbreeding is to be reduced, we do need to know why there is such a difference so better incentives are created.

  • 981
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:44 pm | Permalink

    It is not Gillard grief. It is realism. Kezza is 100% correct.

    The only reason Prime Minister Julia Gillard was driven out of politics is that she had a vagina. Men did what she did hundreds of times over and no-one blinked. But she knocked off a man in a position of power and didn’t that get the boys’ testicles in knots.

    They moved heaven and earth to restore the balance of male power and in the end got what they wanted. The rest of us, especially the women of this country, got well and truly done over in the process.

    Typical.

  • 982
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:46 pm | Permalink

    kezza2@977

    bemused

    I don’t want to belong to a party that has you as a member. Simple as that.

    Well goodbye.


    You sat there and sniped at Gillard throughout her PMship.

    I didn’t like Rudd, at all, I thought he was a simpering idiot, to be frank, but I didn’t say a word against him until he was usurped. By the caucus. Not.One.Thing.

    But that’s not all. You belong to a electoral membership where one of the party stalwarts actively worked against Gillard, namely Alan Griffiths.

    Rather than stick up for her within your own electorate, you rushed in behind Griffiths. And backed him. You did nothing to support Gillard. Or Labor for that matter.

    You knew what had happened. That the Cabinet had lost faith in him, as had the caucus. As shown by the fact that he didn’t even stand against her, in June 2010. You knew. But you didn’t even tell your rep that, given the circumstances, Gillard needed to be supported.

    Gillard needed to be removed while there was still something to salvage. Simple as that. She was a disaster as a leader. BTW, who is Griffiths?


    You carry on about a Faulkner/Bracks report on the 2010 election where it was said that maybe they shouldn’t have gone with Gillard, but you never mention the fact that they also said they would have lost with Rudd. Because he was going nowhere.

    But, you threw your support behind Griffiths, and therefore Rudd. And once you’d done that, you then threw your weight behind a conceited and concerted campaign against her, publicly.

    And, you still won’t give up. That’s why I’m speaking today. I’m sick of listening to your shit about Gillard. She was a good PM. Sure, she made mistakes, just like Whitlam and Hawke did. And she would have gone on to bigger and better things if only the likes of you had told your rep to get stuffed.

    Everyone makes mistakes, but good politicians make less and can recover from those they do make.


    But you didn’t. You liked the idea of bringing her down. And you encouraged him, instead of telling him that it was a really good time to have a female PM.

    Huh??? Who did I encourage to do what?


    Because you couldn’t handle being told what to do by a woman, just as most of the blokes in any electorate can’t handle.

    It doesn’t occur to you that women don’t like being told to do by a man, but we’re used to compromise, you aren’t. And you weren’t prepared to do that, for the sake of the party, when there was an inkling of opportunity to get rid of it.

    And that’s what you did. And you feel good about it. Really good about it. Diddums that Labor lost the 2013 election. At least you helped the LNP get rid of a woman. And returned the world to its rightful position.

    It’s dickheads like you who lost Labor victory in 2013. You should hang your head in shame, except you think you won.

    Yeah, well, enjoy your victory. You have lost a lot of female support.

    Not because Gillard lost her job fair and square, but because men in her own party got rid of her.

    Women are more than 50% of the population. We are not irrelevant. Think on that.

    Had Gillard remained leader at the 2013 election, Labor would have been slaughtered.

    Your outpouring of misandry would embarrass you if you had enough insight.

  • 983
    briefly
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:47 pm | Permalink

    k2.....the eastern states supported SA and WA and NT for over 100 years. WA finally started earning its keep in 2001.

    You’re probably referring to Special Grants made by the States Grants Commission. In the case of WA, these ceased in the early 1970′s. Some of the history is available here:

    http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CDwQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nsw.ipaa.org.au%2Fcontent%2Fdocs%2FPSMP%2FCommonwealth%2520Grants%2520Commission%2520final%2520paper.pdf&ei=NA1VU8HZJsz-lAWgnIDYBg&usg=AFQjCNF4_SfxnVNqWd-8Fh3zR4kQIDjLrw&bvm=bv.65058239,d.dGI

    and here:

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=commonwealth+grants+to+states+-+special+grants&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&gfe_rd=cr&ei=NA1VU_bWHMON8QesuICIDg

    The entire basis for the distribution of revenues to the States was overhauled after Gough’s reforms in 1973 and again following the introduction of the GST.

  • 984
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:47 pm | Permalink

    kezza
    You say it better than me, but if there was a like button you would get mine.

    Don’t think I will ever forget, nor ever forgive.

  • 985
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:48 pm | Permalink

    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:44 pm | PERMALINK
    It is not Gillard grief. It is realism. Kezza is 100% correct.

    The only reason Prime Minister Julia Gillard was driven out of politics is that she had a vagina.

    What has that got to do with what she actually did:

    1. People’s climate change forum
    2. Putting CPRS on hold
    3. East Timor solution
    4. Pacific solution
    5. Turning back boats
    6. We will deliver a surplus
    7. I promise Wilkie gambling legislation
    8. Assange is guilty

    ….you appear to have decided to respond documentation of Gillard’s mistakes by sexism (references to testicles for example).

    She screwed up. If anything, she probably benefitted from being a woman with some voters choosing her in 2010 based on her gender (a number I reckon far exceeds those who would have voted ALP if there was a male leader).

  • 986
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:50 pm | Permalink

    Puff, the Magic Dragon.@984

    kezza
    You say it better than me, but if there was a like button you would get mine.

    Don’t think I will ever forget, nor ever forgive.

    Nothing to forgive and an unpleasant experience best forgotten.

  • 987
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:52 pm | Permalink

    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    ......Don’t think I will ever forget, nor ever forgive.

    Is this Gillard backstabbing Rudd as well, or just Rudd backstabbing Gillard?

    Are you never forgetting or forgiving both or just the one backstab?

  • 988
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:53 pm | Permalink

    It is not misandry to to point out what exactly happened in the misogyny that brought down PM Gillard. She was allowed no mistakes, no room to grow, no kudos for balancing the factions of the party, the hung parliament and the hostile media and no credit for anything achieved.

    As the book title said, she was stalked. The shame of it is that she was stalked by men and male-identified women of her own party in behalf of a man not worth the polish she took of her little finger.

  • 989
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:53 pm | Permalink

    Everything,
    It is none of your business, bog off.

  • 990
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:55 pm | Permalink

    Its a free country and a free blog!*

    I know you don’t like your hypocrisy being shown up, but the solution to that is insight, not insults.

    *other than 18C of course.

  • 991
    zoidlord
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:55 pm | Permalink

    Who backstabbed Malcolm, Mod Lib madam ?

  • 992
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:56 pm | Permalink

    Half the Liberal frontbench at the time, from memory. There was a mass walk out just before he was dumped by 1 vote.

  • 993
    Everything
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:58 pm | Permalink

    I am not so naive about Malcolm though! He screwed up as leader as he was too green (in more ways than one!) and needed some political maturing, which he has now done.

    Turnbull would win massive in the next election if he took the leadership……its just unfortunate that it aint gonna happen! :devil:

  • 994
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:59 pm | Permalink

    No, bemused. It was a wonderful experience. As a woman and a member of 51% of the population denied political representation at the highest level for all of our history, it was brilliant. I enjoyed it, I took pride in the PMship of Julia Gillard. Her mistakes were no more than any other PM and only the stalkers required perfection. Her brilliance was not enough.

    It was not unpleasant at all. It was exhilarating, even given the poor behaviour of the misogynists.

    I will remember it as a high point of ALP history. I am glad I lived it.

    Forget it never, forgive, never.

  • 995
    briefly
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:59 pm | Permalink

    bemused..

    The problem with the ALP is not that it has former union officials in parliament, but that it has too few from other backgrounds. The gene pool has narrowed way too much.

    The result is that too often safe seats have been given to worn-out officials or their spouses – sinecures for those with no talent, no energy and no connection with voters.

  • 996
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 11:00 pm | Permalink

    Puff, the Magic Dragon.@988

    It is not misandry to to point out what exactly happened in the misogyny that brought down PM Gillard. She was allowed no mistakes, no room to grow, no kudos for balancing the factions of the party, the hung parliament and the hostile media and no credit for anything achieved.

    As the book title said, she was stalked. The shame of it is that she was stalked by men and male-identified women of her own party in behalf of a man not worth the polish she took of her little finger.

    She was incompetent and had to go.

    There are competent women in senior positions in the ALP.

    Get over your misandry and stop making excuses for her. She is not worth it.

  • 997
    kezza2
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 11:01 pm | Permalink

    Puff

    The only reason Prime Minister Julia Gillard was driven out of politics is that she had a vagina. Men did what she did hundreds of times over and no-one blinked.

    Yeah, a bit like Ted Bailleau getting rolled by the insipid Napthine in Victoria, and that Terry Mills getting rolled by Adam Giles in NT, and Mike Baird replacing the disgraced Grange O’Farrell.

    Not a whimper in the ranks because the new order is the same as the old order.

    Bit the same as Nelson being replaced by Turnbull being replaced by Abbott.

    All dicks. No vaginas.

    But wait, there’s more.

    When there’s trouble, let’s replace the dick with a vagina and then they can lose.

    Where did that happen?

    Hmm. Victoria, WA, Tassie, NSW, Qld (oops, Bligh wasn’t supposed to win after Beattie) et fkn cetera.

    Do you blokes get the picture yet, or are you still in Wonderland?

  • 998
    zoidlord
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 11:02 pm | Permalink

    Exactly, so talking of hypocrisy of this blog, hindsight is a wonderful thing.

    So tell me how did half the liberal front bench walked out turned into 42 votes to 41?

    Not a very convincing win.

  • 999
    bemused
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 11:03 pm | Permalink

    briefly@995


    bemused..

    The problem with the ALP is not that it has former union officials in parliament, but that it has too few from other backgrounds. The gene pool has narrowed way too much.


    The result is that too often safe seats have been given to worn-out officials or their spouses – sinecures for those with no talent, no energy and no connection with voters.

    Absolutely correct.
    Also too many lawyers.
    And I am not interested in their gender.

  • 1000
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Monday, April 21, 2014 at 11:03 pm | Permalink

    Everything,
    Yes it is a free blog, so I say again, bog off you mindless twit. I am not wasting my breath or fingers talking to an idiot who supports the Liberal Party and Tony Abbott. Do you want to see a clip of his bloopers. Perhaps we will start with him recoiling in horror at the touch of a sick child.

    You hypocrite.

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