tip off

BludgerTrack: 51.1-48.9 to Labor

A closer look at the parties’ polling fortunes this term state-by-state, in lieu of much to go on in the way of new polling over Easter.

Easter has meant that only the regular weekly pollsters have reported this week, which means Essential Research and Morgan. The latter polls weekly but reports fortnightly, which I deal with by dividing each fortnightly result into two data points, each with half the published sample size. Neither Essential nor Morgan is radically off beam, so this week’s movements involve a correction after last week’s Greens outlier from Nielsen. This is not to say that Nielsen’s Greens surge was measuring nothing at all, the 17% result perhaps having been partly a reflection of it being the poll most proximate to the WA Senate election. In fact, both of the new results this week find the Greens at their highest level since at least the last election, and probably a good while earlier. Their 11% rating in Essential may not appear too spectacular, but it comes from what is the worst polling series for them by some distance – indeed, the only one the BludgerTrack model does not deem to be biased in their favour. Nonetheless, their rating in BludgerTrack this week comes off 1.8% on last week’s Nielsen-driven peak.

The dividend from the Greens’ loss has been divided between other parties in such a way as to produce essentially no change on two-party preferred. However, state relativities have changed in such a way as to cost Labor three seats and its projected majority, illustrating once again the sensitivity of Queensland, where a 0.8% shift has made two seats’ worth of difference. The New South Wales result has also shifted 0.6% to the Coalition, moving a third seat back into their column. Another change worth noting is a 2.4% move to Labor in Tasmania, which is down to a methodological change – namely the inclusion, for Tasmania only, of the state-level two-party preferred results that Morgan has taken to publishing. I had not been putting this data to use thus far, as the BludgerTrack model runs off primary votes and the figures in question are presumably respondent-allocated preferences besides. However, the paucity of data for Tasmania is such that I’ve decided it’s worth my while to extract modelled primary votes from Morgan’s figures, imperfect though they may be. The change has not made any difference to the seat projection, this week at least.

Finally, I’ve amused myself by producing primary vote and two-party preferred trendlines for each of the five mainland states, which you can see below. These suggest that not too much has separated New South Wales and Victoria in the changes recorded over the current term, leaving aside their very different starting points. However, whereas the Coalition has had a very gentle upward trend this year in Victoria and perhaps also New South Wales, their decline looks to have resumed lately in Queensland. Last week I noted that six successive data points I was aware of had Labor ahead on two-party preferred in Queensland, including five which are in the model and a Morgan result which is not. That’s now extended to eight with the availability of two further data points this week. The other eye-catching result in the charts below is of course from Western Australia, which clearly shows the effects of the Senate election with respect to both the Greens and Palmer United. The current gap between Labor and the Greens is such that the latter could well win lower house seats at Labor’s expense on these numbers – not that I recommend holding my breath waiting for that to happen.

1662
  • 101
    briefly
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:10 pm | Permalink

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brendan_O%27Neill_%28journalist%29

    ....O'Neill has contributed articles to publications in the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia including The Spectator, the New Statesman, The Guardian, BBC News Online, The Australian, The Christian Science Monitor, The American Conservative, Salon.com, and Rising East. He occasionally blogged at Comment is free, but is now a regular blogger at telegraph.co.uk. He writes a column for The Big Issue in London and The Australian in Sydney.
    Views

    O'Neill has criticised the notion of tackling global warming by solely reducing carbon emissions, and instead advocates technological progress as a method of overcoming any side-effects of climate change. In January 2006, he co-founded the Manifesto Club, an organisation "with the aim of challenging cultural trends that restrain and stifle people's aspirations and initiative". Broadly libertarian, he considers efforts to combat racism in football to be "a class war" driven by "elites' utter incomprehension of the mass passions that get aired at football matches". Referring to high-profile cases of racial abuse and alleged racial abuse, he argued, "these incidents and alleged incidents are not racism at all, in the true meaning of the word", due to the levels of passion involved, describing anti-racism efforts as "a pretty poisonous desire to police the ... working classes".

    Though describing himself as "an atheistic libertarian", he criticised opposition to Pope Benedict XVI's visit to the United Kingdom as intolerant and fearmongering.

    He has written extensively against same-sex marriage, as well as the same-sex marriage campaign, in Spiked Online, criticising the methods by which the acceptance of same sex marriage is spread and calling into question the legitimacy of legalising same sex marriage itself.

    O'Neill and others associated with the Revolutionary Communist Party, Living Marxism and Spiked—including Frank Furedi, Mick Hume and Claire Fox—are often seen by commenters such as Nick Cohen as having shifted from a far left position to an extreme stance on the libertarian right. Although O'Neill still insists that he is part of the left, critics such as George Monbiot have suggested that this is typical as a ploy adopted by those associated with the RCP to split and discredit consensus upon the left and to cause impediments for such movements as environmentalism and the reduction of carbon emissions.

    O'Neill is the author of the green satire Can I Recycle My Granny and 39 Other Eco-Dilemmas, published by Hodder & Stoughton in 2008.

    O’Neil sounds like just another completely asinine, pilfering fraud.

  • 102
    CTar1
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

    shellbell

    Vale Barry O’Keefe, Johnny’s brother and former ICAC commissioner

    Yep

  • 103
    Player One
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

    Jackol@97

    Also good from Eslake on Abbott’s PPL:


    But in my view, it will do next to nothing to lift either participation of women in the workforce or productivity of those who are in the workforce.

    Fair point, but that’s not really the point of it, is it? The point of the PPL is to give wealthy single-income families a $75,000 welfare rort … er … entitelement … er … bonus … or something.

  • 104
    KEVIN-ONE-SEVEN
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    PLAYER – You are right. Most of them bought the Asylum Boats bullsh… so it serves them right.

  • 105
    Libertarian Unionist
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:15 pm | Permalink

    O’Neil is the contrarian’s contrarian. He’s the type of shit stirrer Tom Switzer wishes he could be.

  • 106
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:18 pm | Permalink

    @SwannyQLD: Audit Comm’s spending forecasts aren’t Treasury’s nor are they a credible baseline to shape future policy decisions #alibiforbrokenpromises

  • 107
    KEVIN-ONE-SEVEN
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:19 pm | Permalink

    Am I missing something, or is Joe Hockey a particularly dim bulb. Affable yes. Smart no. He seems to have a few basic concepts locked in his brain (small govt is good) and really can’t process anything else.

  • 108
    WeWantPaul
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:19 pm | Permalink

    I see the Bludger Greens are still doing Defence Policy debate by criticising any and all defence expenditure.

    The JSF is kinda an own goal in that respect.

  • 109
    KEVIN-ONE-SEVEN
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:19 pm | Permalink

    CTar1 – They used to call Barry the “Mild One”

  • 110
    kakuru
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:22 pm | Permalink

    briefly:

    Broadly libertarian, he considers efforts to combat racism in football to be "a class war" driven by "elites' utter incomprehension of the mass passions that get aired at football matches"

    Yikes! What a turd. Call me elitist, but I’d rather not have sporting passions channeled through racial slurs.

    Although O'Neill still insists that he is part of the left, critics such as George Monbiot have suggested that this is typical as a ploy adopted by those associated with the RCP to split and discredit consensus upon the left and to cause impediments for such movements as environmentalism and the reduction of carbon emissions.

    Yep, that rings true. He was trying too hard too plead his case that he was, actually, from the left. Everything that poured forth from his mouth was right-wing libertarianism.

    Asinine, pilfering fraud sums him up.

  • 111
    Jackol
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    And why are we subjected to O’Neill’s opinions so frequently? Are there not enough Australian shit stirrers that we have to import British ones?

  • 112
    CTar1
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    k17

    JOK’s son was a lawyer in the AG’s Dept and about as docile as they come.

  • 113
    dave
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:28 pm | Permalink

    KEVIN-ONE-SEVEN
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 11:52 am | Permalink

    ....They will torch the elderly who vote for them before they will do anything (and I mean anything) to hurt their mates in finance.

    Lets see how long it takes for older voters to wake up they have been had, ie unless they are wealthy.

    We know the likely answer – most of them won’t wake up and therefore deserve what they get.

    Too late now.

  • 114
    briefly
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:29 pm | Permalink

    96
    Fran Barlow

    The party Brendan O’Neill was associated with, in the 1980s, was Cliffite — a split from the SWP — but by the 1990s they had come to see Thatcher as an ally and had constructively abandoned Marxism in favour of provocateur behaviour and trendy publishing.

    This is politics as bi-polarity, as a board game in which to play is to oscillate from one extreme to another; an example of isotopic dialectics, where nothing is ever quite what it looks like; where the individual exists in the conflicted space between self denial and self determination while faking everything.

    ;)

    :)

  • 115
    outside left
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:29 pm | Permalink

    MTBW, if that is the case ,then Verity better get a vacancy soon, because the groundswell for popular election of Senate, MLC,and other positions is huge. We had Luke Foley as a guest last night at our branch and he was very good. Being the shadow environment minister he was disappointed at the removal of Robyn Parker as Minister because she is such a dimwit it was making his job easy. ‘Logging is good for Koalas’ was one of her best ones!

  • 116
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

    “@joeobrien24: Labor’s Tony Burke media conf coming up in next few mins .. watch live on @abcnews24 .. from Lakemba”

  • 117
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

    “@andrew_lund: Treasurer @michaelobrienmp about to outline budget “revenue measures”. Afternoon before a public holiday- unlikely to be good… @9newsmelb”

  • 118
    Phil Vee
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

    Joe Hockey said last night that the bureaucracy of government is moribund and there is a dramatic incapacity to implement policy and carry out change.

    I waited for him to say how he is going to fix this problem but there was nothing. Does he mean more money and people are needed to carry out his programs? Will he invest in more public servants? Or is he going to sub contract out the entire Public Service ?

    I have no idea what he will do or what he means by saying this. Maybe he is just having a grizzle.

    From the transcript off last nights interview
    We have to – one of the challenges, Andrew, is – and I haven’t said this before, but what has become most evident is that the infrastructure of Government today is in far worse position than when I was last in Government in 2007.

    And the infrastructure legacy left has – is in such a moribund state that our policy initiatives are increasingly difficult to actually deliver. We could come up with a very best policy initiatives to help to end the age of entitlement but the incapacity to actually change the system is so dramatic – I mean I will give you one example. (example deleted). (Rambles about Centrelink and the Pentagon having the same kind of computer)
    6:49 PM
    http://beta.tveeder.com/560/byrange?&from=1398240000&to=1398243600

  • 119
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:36 pm | Permalink

    “@andrew_lund: Car rego to go up by $25 a year. Stamp duty on cars also going up @9newsmelb”

  • 120
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:39 pm | Permalink

    @Phil Vee/118

    In Secret.

    @guytaur/119

    So much for Cheaper New Cars.

  • 121
    CTar1
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

    zoid

    So much for Cheaper New Cars.

    As reported yesterday you can get a $1,500 discount by not turning up in a Commodore as a trade in.

    I’m astonished by the cost of new cars.

  • 122
    zoomster
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

    jackol

    Are there not enough Australian shit stirrers that we have to import British ones?

    Maybe he came in on a 457 visa…

  • 123
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

    To further my rant to Hockey about “leaving infrastructure worse than they left in 2007′, well they can’t blame Labor for the state of the Copper Network.

    That was Coalition Party fault there.

  • 124
    briefly
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

    118
    Phil Vee

    Joe Hockey said last night that the bureaucracy of government is moribund and there is a dramatic incapacity to implement policy and carry out change.

    I waited for him to say how he is going to fix this problem but there was nothing. Does he mean more money and people are needed to carry out his programs? Will he invest in more public servants? Or is he going to sub contract out the entire Public Service ?

    "We have to – one of the challenges, Andrew, is – and I haven’t said this before, but what has become most evident is that the infrastructure of Government today is in far worse position than when I was last in Government in 2007.

    And the infrastructure legacy left has – is in such a moribund state that our policy initiatives are increasingly difficult to actually deliver. We could come up with a very best policy initiatives to help to end the age of entitlement but the incapacity to actually change the system is so dramatic..."

    Perhaps this is about Hockey creating excuses for himself. When things go wrong, as they inevitably will if he follows his Tory instincts, he will be able to blame the public service instead of his own ideas and policies. After all, the LNP want the overthrow of a social compact that has been in place in one form or another since WW2. Things are inevitably going to come unstuck before long.

    But aside from that, organisational inertia is often a problem. To deal with that, organisations need to be effectively led on a path of transformational change. It’s very doubtful that the LNP, who have spent no time thinking seriously about their policies, have any idea how to go about this. Hockey and the LNP in general have been attacking the very instrument they need to call on to carry our their programs. Rather than expanding its capacity to conceive and act on policies – something the LNP in any case do not believe is possible – they have been trying to weaken it. If the public service is not working for them, they have only themselves to blame.

  • 125
    Edwina StJohn
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

    Y’all need some reality therapy. Oppos which are 1.5 points in front 2 years before an election lose. The ones that win are typically 5 points or more in front.

    Folk don’t like bill and there hasn’t been cut through. The smarter people in NSW like dastayari have already worked it out. He obviously doesn’t buy his own rhetoric – just mouthing lines. There might be a respite if the libs blow the budget swannie style but otherwise bill will be as well remembered as frank Tudor. Sorry chaps.

  • 126
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:54 pm | Permalink

    @EDJ/125

    Ah trying to drum up leadershit.

    What happened to the ~60% range of polling…

  • 127
    briefly
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:55 pm | Permalink

    This could be Glenn Stevens rebuking Hockey…

    http://www.reuters.com/finance/currencies

    LIMA, April 23 - Peru's central bank chief said Wednesday that the finance minister was wrong to criticize the monetary authority's handling of the local currency, in a rare display of tensions between the country's top economic managers.

  • 128
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:56 pm | Permalink

    http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/nothing-is-free-joe-hockey-warns-of-budget-pain-with-pensions-in-the-firing-line-20140423-zqyaq.html

    Nothing is free?

    What about the dodgy planes that we are buying? That apparently couldn’t be cancelled.

  • 129
    imacca
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 12:57 pm | Permalink

    t’s very doubtful that the LNP, who have spent no time thinking seriously about their policies, have any idea how to go about this.

    But..But…they dont need policies to know what to do!!

    Thats what the IPA’s pre-election wish list was for you silly. :)

  • 130
    briefly
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:00 pm | Permalink

    129....imacca

    You’re right of course. They’re all such hooligans.

  • 131
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:02 pm | Permalink

    I have seen this a few times now by different people.

    “@dimka_syd: I’d love to spend more money in your store @myer but your retail staff are too busy talking to each other. Going home to shop online.”

  • 132
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:05 pm | Permalink

    “@SabraLane: The White Paper on the Emissions Reduction fund will be out this afternoon.”

  • 133
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:05 pm | Permalink

    “@political_alert: Environment Minister Greg Hunt will hold a press conference to discuss the Emissions Reduction Fund White Paper, 3pm, Parliament #auspol”

  • 134
    bemused
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:07 pm | Permalink

    Player One@51

    bemused@23

    From previous thread:
    bemused@1110 on Morgan: 52-48 to Labor | The Poll Bludger

    You are not merely a grub, but a disgraceful grub!

    You know damn well that I abhor violence toward women and children in any form.

    For the record, Rosie Batty indicated that her ex was aggressive, abusive and violent toward her, but never her son until that dreadful event and she had believed he would never harm their son.

    I have no problem with competent women being in authority and some of the best bosses I have ever had were women.

    I have also supported and campaigned for women candidates.

    Yes, someone here has a problem, and that is you! And your problem is dealing with the truth.

    Yes, yes. We get it bemused. You believe violence against women only occurs in the presence of mental illness, becasue .. because … well, men just wouldn’t do that unless they were mentally ill and therefore not responsible for their actions, would they?

    You are now resorting to downright lies obnoxious grub.

    Mental illness is but one of a number of factors that can cause violent behaviour. Drugs and alcohol are two others.

    The importance of knowing underlying factors is so they can be addressed, in an appropriate manner, hopefully before tragedy occurs.

    Obviously a far too sophisticated idea for your tiny brain cell to process.

    In the case of the death of Luke Batty, mental illness was a factor as his mother has said.

    "Ms Batty says she had known Greg for 20 years, and over that time his mental health deteriorated.

    "{He went} from someone who brushed off losing a job to someone that was unemployable," she said.

    "He was in a homelessness situation for many years. His life was failing. Everything was becoming worse in his life and Luke was the only bright light in his life."

    She says Greg had been offered help, but he failed to accept it, instead choosing to "believe he was OK".

    This is but one of many reports along similar lines. You, victoria and Puff should read it.

    Father who killed son, Luke Batty, at cricket ground had history of mental illness, says boy’s anguished mother

  • 135
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:07 pm | Permalink

    ESJ, you need the reality check. Your side is trailing and I don’t think that you are actually aware of how hated your guy is becoming. That’s okay though – party hacks rarely have a clue about that kind of stuff.

    Your desperate spin is starting to sound like the desperate spin of the Labor hacks during last term. “It’s a win for us because, despite all the shit, we’re only trailing by a couple of points”, “Tony will never be PM because nobody likes him and the party will challenge him soon” – replace Tony with Bill and that’s the desperate spin you’re peddling.

    Time to get out of your bubble and face reality. The Coalition Government is NOT in a strong position and it’s not going to get out of it just by having a clever campaign in 2016.

    I concede they probably can get another term because they have enough seats to lose but it definitely is no certainty – and certainly doesn’t warrant being smug and condescending about it.

    Sorry chap.

  • 136
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

    What Joe Hockey really means:
    australianpolitics.com/2014/04/23/the-case-for-change-joe-hockey-speech.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-case-for-change-joe-hockey-speech

    “The only sustainable solution is to wind back the excessive levels of spending.”

  • 137
    don
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

    guytaur@131

    I have seen this a few times now by different people.

    “@dimka_syd: I’d love to spend more money in your store @myer but your retail staff are too busy talking to each other. Going home to shop online.”

    It’s nothing new.

    A long time ago I was in a Penney’s Variety store, a store with multiple shop counters spread around the store, each with one or two attendants.

    I wanted to purchase something, there was no one at all behind the counter I was at, waved my prospective purchase in the air, no response from two female attendants not far away having a gossip, but too far away for me to hear what they were saying.

    So I reached over to the cash register, and pounded on the bell on top of it until somebody came.

    I’ve thought since that opening the cash register might have got a quicker response…

  • 138
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:10 pm | Permalink

    “@Madaferrari: TA comparing Kelly Slater and the Royals. Classic #auspol”

  • 139
    guytaur
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:14 pm | Permalink

    don

    Yeah. At least now you can shop online and bypass that. A small business I understand.

    The big retailers should train their people properly. Leave gossip and talking shop for staff areas on the floor the customer is king.

    I say this with no retail management experience

  • 140
    Jackol
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:15 pm | Permalink

    Keane gets in a good dig at the government, and Hockey in particular, on their budget nonsense rhetoric:

    But you can’t forgive decisions that are dramatically cutting revenue, by up to $15 billion, while Hockey complains about the budget mess he has to fix. You can’t forgive claiming all will share the burden while the government’s favourites get a handout. And you can’t forgive a politician dressing all that up in morality.

    http://www.crikey.com.au/2014/04/24/who-shares-the-burden-in-hockeys-morality-play/

  • 141
    psyclaw
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    Just heard Hockey on the 1.00pm news.

    He said “people should work as long as they can”.

    So that bells his cat …. in his strange mind he sees as the ideal situation that people plan so well that they die on the evening that they retire.

    Doubtless such a scheme would save billions and our economy would thrive.

    So life and work …. what’s it all about Joe? ….. ever thought of just farking off!

  • 142
    zoomster
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    Oppos which are 1.5 points in front 2 years before an election lose. The ones that win are typically 5 points or more in front.

    Let’s have a quick reality check on that one…

    Two years before 2007, which the Labor Opposition won, Labor was polling 49%.

    http://polling.newspoll.com.au.tmp.anchor.net.au/image_uploads/cgi-lib.3024.1.0603_Fed.pdf

    Two years before 2013, which the Liberal Opposition won, the polls were 50/50

    http://polling.newspoll.com.au/image_uploads/110806%20Federal%20Voting%20Intention%20&%20Leaders%20Ratings.pdf

    So your hypothesis is wrong.
    Two years before

  • 143
    MTBW
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    outside left @115

    Interesting! I have said on many occasions before that this merry go round of giving seats to MP’s who have lost their seat annoys the hell out of me.

    Glad that the groundswell for popular elections is huge.

    That is the kind of process that needs to be adopted. Verity has had her turn but the wheel just goes round and round.

    I like the style of Luke Foley as well.

  • 144
    psyclaw
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    Just heard Hockey on the 1.00pm news.

    He said “people should work as long as they can”.

    So that bells his cat …. in his strange mind he sees as the ideal situation that people plan so well that they die on the evening that they retire.

    Doubtless such a scheme would save billions and our economy would thrive.

    So life and work …. what’s it all about Joe? ….. ever thought of just farking off!

  • 145
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:19 pm | Permalink

    @psyclaw/141

    Hockey & Co is all about getting the Old, The Disabled, back to work.

    “We believe the best welfare is a job”.

  • 146
    confessions
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:20 pm | Permalink

    He said “people should work as long as they can”.

    I really don’t understand this view, nor do I get what the govt is pushing for when they run this stuff.

    If a person has saved enough to sustain themselves in retirement, then why shouldn’t they retire when they want to?

  • 147
    zoidlord
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:20 pm | Permalink

    http://theaimn.com/2014/04/21/19611/

    “When asked if he was trying to reduce the number of people on the Disability Pension, he denied this, saying, “This is not about targets … it’s about a better system that will actually help people because we think work is the best form of welfare.” He went on to say that this was entirely consistent with the government’s position on the Age Pension.”

    Completely rubbish.

  • 148
    MTBW
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

    zoid

    Yeah! And when you are mentally ill of physically impaired who wants to employ you.

  • 149
    Jackol
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

    So life and work …. what’s it all about Joe?

    In Joe’s mind, clearly, it is our collective responsibility to work as hard and as long as possible because the only good thing we can ever do in life is to produce so we can consume.

    Working a bit less and being a bit less wealthy? Crazy talk!

    Get on that treadmill, people!

  • 150
    MTBW
    Posted Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 1:22 pm | Permalink

    “or”

Womens Agenda

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Smart Company

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StartupSmart

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Property Observer

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