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Seats of the week: Fadden and Moncrieff

This week’s Seat of the Week double-up accounts for the northern two-third of the Gold Coast, served by Liberal National Party members Stuart Robert and Steven Ciobo.

Fadden

Teal and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for the LNP and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Fadden covers the northern part of the Gold Coast municipality, from Gaven and Labrador in the south through Coomera, Pimpama and Ormeau to Logan River in the north, with the Pacific Motorway forming most of its western boundary. This area’s intensive population growth has caused the electorate to be progressively drawn into the Gold Coast since its creation in 1977, at which time it contained none of its present territory, instead covering outer southern Brisbane and the Gold Coast’s rural hinterland. The redistribution caused by the expansion of parliament in 1984 drew it into Brisbane, extending as far northwards as Salisbury and Rochedale, with the Logan River as its southern boundary. It first infringed upon the Gold Coast when it acquired Coomera at the 1996 election, the migration being completed with the exchange of Redland Bay in the north for Southport in the south at the 2004 election. The ongoing population explosion caused it to shed nearly 14,000 voters inland of its current boundary at the most recent Queensland redistribution before the 2010 election.

With the exception of 1983, Fadden in its various guises has been won at every election by the conservatives, meaning the the Liberal Party prior to the 2010 merger and the Liberal National Party thereafter. The inaugural member was Don Cameron, who had held Griffith for the Liberals since 1966. The 1975-engorged margin was whittled away at the 1977 and 1980 elections, then overturned with David Beddall’s victory for Labor with the election of the Hawke government. Cameron returned to parliament a year later at a by-election caused by Jim Killen’s retirement in Moreton, which became the third seat he represented. The 1984 redistribution made Fadden notionally Liberal, causing David Beddall to jump ship for Rankin. The seat was then won for the Liberals by David Jull, who had held the seat of Bowman from 1975 until his defeat in 1983. Jull’s margins were less than 5% until 1996, but generally well into double digits thereafter.

Jull was succeeded on his retirement at the 2007 election by Stuart Robert, a former army intelligence officer. Robert was said to have played a role in “rounding up support” for Tony Abbott ahead of his challenge to Malcolm Turnbull’s leadership in December 2009, and was elevated afterwards to shadow parliamentary secretary in the defence portfolio. He was further promoted after the 2010 election to the outer shadow ministry portfolio of defence science, technology and personnel, which was rebadged as Assistant Defence Minister following the 2013 election victory.

Moncrieff

Teal numbers indicate two-party majority for the LNP. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Moncrieff covers the central Gold Coast from Miami north through Surfers Paradise to Nerang Head, and inland to Nerang and Highland Park. The seat was created with the expansion of parliament in 1984, previous to which the entirety of the Gold Coast had been accommodated by McPherson since 1949, and by Moreton beforehand. Moncrieff originally extended deep into rural territory at Beaudesert, before assuming its current coastal orientation with Beaudesert’s transfer to Forde in 1996. Prior to Moncrieff’s creation the entirety of the Gold Coast had been accommodated by McPherson, which had itself been created with the previous expansion of parliament in 1949. The Gold Coast had originally been contained within the electorate of Moreton, which has since migrated into Brisbane’s southern suburbs. The area has had conservative representation without interruption since 1906, with McPherson passing from Country Party to Liberal Party control in 1972, and Moncrieff being in Liberal and more recently Liberal National Party hands since its creation.

Steven Ciobo assumed the seat at the 2001 election after the retirement of its inaugural member, Kathy Sullivan, who had previously been a Senator since 1974, establishing what remains a record as the longest serving female member of federal parliament. Ciobo emerged through Liberal ranks as a member of the Right faction, associated with former ministers Santo Santoro and Warwick Parer and state party powerbroker Michael Caltabiano. He rose to the shadow ministry in the small business portfolio after the defeat of the Howard government, which was elevated to a shadow cabinet position when Malcolm Turnbull ascended to the leadership in September 2008. However, he was demoted to the outer shadow ministry portfolios of tourism, arts, youth and sport when Tony Abbott became leader in December 2009 and relegated to the back bench after the August 2010 election, which was generally reckoned to be a consequence of his support for Turnbull. Following the 2013 election victory he won promotion to parliamentary secretary to the Treasurer.

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  • 101
    Greensborough Growler
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:14 am | Permalink

    vic,

    They might recommend broadening the GST to include food and books rather than increase the rate. Apparently, our GST is fairly narrow in what it captures compared to other similar taxes elsewhere in the world.

    Tim Costello was advocating this approach in an interview I heard the other day. His view was that not taxing fresh food was disadvantageous to people on lower incomes because they tended to eat more processed food which does incur the GST.

  • 102
    Atticus
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:15 am | Permalink

    I cant see how people will be apathetic with the assault on medicare, uni fees, pension cuts etc, as the full impact of these changes will be felt in the next two years rather than now

    Victoria,
    Ex-Lib MP Jackie Kelly made similar points to yours today, saying those impacts will hurt badly – - – - for example, often all her kids would get sick at same time.

    Compare how difficult it was for folks to grasp what Labor’s NBN entailed, let alone to imagine its potential for the nation’s future. A fair chunk of Labor budgets and political capital went into NBN, but all Turnbull had to say was their NBN would do the job for a lot less money. Now it’s the LNP who must for over two years call upon voters’ imaginations to accept that so many ongoing sacrifices experienced by their family and friends are absolutely necessary, thoroughly square, and scrupulously shared by everyone else.

  • 103
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:17 am | Permalink

    Atticus

    If a Lib like jackie kelly is articulating this, the fibs are stuffed

  • 104
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:17 am | Permalink

    Dee@31

    Victoria

    Some PBer’s seemed to think the outrage was ‘real’.

    Yes, the ones not wearing tinfoil hats. :|

  • 105
    Dee
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:17 am | Permalink

    Mike

    I was really sus when Newman stated he was hopping mad.

    Another Rabbott!

    Both are cut from the same cloth in more ways than their political ideology.

    When together, they mirror each other in every way.

    The double speak, the walk, the hands, the language, the facial expressions.

    Truly scary shit!

  • 106
    dave
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:18 am | Permalink

    Dee@85

    Dave

    I always keep the faith but never underestimate the opponent.

    Dee – agree.

    Lots of vested interests will want abbott to remain in power at all costs.

    Australian voters need to stand up in their own interests – not vote against their interests.

    The penny is dropping – even for the likes of rummel.

  • 107
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:18 am | Permalink

    GG

    Broadening GST on books? Who buys books in great numbers anymore?

  • 108
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:19 am | Permalink

    I should dd that even school text books are now being sold as e books to be accessed via fhe net

  • 109
    Darn
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:19 am | Permalink

    Further to my previous comment…

    Mr Abbott’s “great big new tax” has a nice ring to it, don’t you think?

  • 110
    ShowsOn
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:21 am | Permalink

    Interesting idea on renewable energy …

    Pie in the sky fairyland crap.

    We need to be investing NOW in technologies that we know work, not unproven rubbish that may turn out to cost a fortune.

    This is just as bad as people like Greg Hunt who just assert that clean coal will save us without any evidence to back up that claim.

  • 111
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:21 am | Permalink

    Darn@32

    I have just read the Mike Carlton article linked by BK and would urge anyone who hasn’t already done so to read it now, even the resident tories here. It lays bare the extent of the confidence trick this government has played on the Australian people and labels Abbott as the biggest liar and hypocrite in Australian political history. I couldn’t agree more.

    I curse Mike Carlton each Friday evening as my intentions to have an early night are overwhelmed by the desire to read his column, and I end up staying up till it appears a bit after midnight.

    But I am rarely disappointed on reading it. ;)

    I linked it as soon as it appeared approx 12:15am.

  • 112
    KEVIN-ONE-SEVEN
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:23 am | Permalink

    Isn’t it time for Joe to explain that a medicare co-payment is only 1000th the cost of a bottle of grange?

  • 113
    Greensborough Growler
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:25 am | Permalink

    Mike Carlton should just learn to stop pulling his punches!

  • 114
    Dee
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:28 am | Permalink

    Bemused

    Yes, the ones not wearing tinfoil hats

    How uncanny! :)

    I was going to precede my comment with

    'I thought this outrage from state premiers was bullshit but did not say so as some would accuse me of wearing a tinfoil hat'

    Opens door…and it walks in….

  • 115
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:29 am | Permalink

    sohar@54

    Interesting that the Age has no mention of Carlton’s SMH story. In fact they have purged him completely as one of the paper’s columnists – but continue to list other Sydney based writers.

    Has The Age ever listed him?

    Much to my disappointment, I don’t think they have.

    The only possible reason I can think of is that he is sometimes a bit Sydney centric and Victorians are rather parochial.

  • 116
    MTBW
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:29 am | Permalink

    bemused @92

    Kelly is up to something this is not the first time she has criticised the Libs – she has had a couple of goes at them of late.

    I am wondering is she would run as an independant – can’t see her being endorsed by the ALP.

  • 117
    DisplayName
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:31 am | Permalink

    I don’t think that the Libs will see it as a disadvantage to have a little stoush between State and Federal.

  • 118
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:33 am | Permalink

    When looking at Michael Gordon’s articlr, i can see Mike carlton’s piece listed on the right hand side

    http://www.theage.com.au/comment/a-fight-to-the-death-for-two-leaders-in-denial-20140516-zrf7s.html

  • 119
    BK
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:34 am | Permalink

    K17
    Or one tenth the price of a decent cigar. (Not that I smoke the vile things!)

  • 120
    Greensborough Growler
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:34 am | Permalink

    Kelly is an Abbott surrogate. Remember when she became entangled in her racist campaign material being distributed before the 2010 election.

    Abbott was the one who fed her the lines about it being a “Chaser like stunt”; you know just a lark.

    Many Libs seem to be positioning themselves to try and take advantage of the Liberal factionalism that is now on display.

  • 121
    sohar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:37 am | Permalink

    Victoria,
    You were right the first time – the accepted past participle for “get” is “got” these days. Maybe “gotten” is American.

  • 122
    Atticus
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:38 am | Permalink

    Bemused,
    Thanks for last night’s link to to Carlton’s brilliant barrage. It helped me to sleep soundly knowing that not the all of the SMH mediacrats are too scared to go the mongrel on Abbott’s budget.

    By the way, SMH could use some hard-hitting headlines and cartoons from Fairfax-owned ‘Illawarra Mercury’, which has a new editor who dropped their exasperating false-equivalence of the past decade.

  • 123
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:39 am | Permalink

    Greensborough Growler@75

    vic and Rex,

    The resort to a judicial inquiry is a sure means to not achieve much.

    The most recent similar type of inquiry is the Bushfire RC which ended up being a shit fight about whether Christine Nixon should have gone to dinner.

    Somehow, the tragedy was recuced to a focus on personalities and blame shifting. It was actually a terrible natural event that overwhelmed the available resources.

    I’ve been up to Kinglake and surrounds in recent times and the undergrowth is returning. So, a RC only fulfilled the needs to have the drama of personal tragedy played out. The lessons of that day are gradually being eroded from our consciousness and no doubt we will be doomed to repeat the whole tragedy again at some unspecified time in the future.

    Christine Nixon’s failures was only a tiny part of that RC.

    And the worst fire appeared to have an avoidable cause and might have been contained with a faster response.

    There were also failures in communications and control identified.

    And that’s just what I can remember, probably much more.

  • 124
    Dee
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:39 am | Permalink

    Months ago Hockey said he was open to a rise in the GST and if the states want it then they need to build the case for it.

  • 125
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:39 am | Permalink

    sohar

    Either term does not sound correct to be honest. Hence my confusion

  • 126
    Fran Barlow
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:40 am | Permalink

    ShowsOn

    You certainly aren’t one of those folk bound by an impulse to assemble salient data and reflect on it before declaring a position. It may well turn out to be impracticable as an energy device or as desal, but until we have something like good modelling to support that, comparing it with CC&S (about which much more is known and which sounds counter-intuitive) is simply premature.

    http://buff.ly/1gbtYfx

  • 127
    sceptic
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:43 am | Permalink

    bemused @ 92

    Kelly = PUP

  • 128
    Thomas. Paine.
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:47 am | Permalink

    Abbott and Hockey’s new Australia based on the American model where 40-50 million on food stamps, a working poor and a nation of part time workers…..where in some places you have to buy a licence if you want to feed the hungry and homeless. ..and in a number of major cities it is actually crime to feed the homeless and hungry.

    The state trying to remove empathy and sympathy from its population and to divide the between elite and servants. Abbotts new vision for Australians?

  • 129
    zoomster
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:50 am | Permalink

    Something’s fishy about the way the Libs have structured the Medicare co payment.

    Basically, there is no reason for the government to push for it to pass – it benefits GPs (whilst imposing an extra burden of paperwork which probably makes the extra $2 insignificant) and goes into a fund for medical research.

    Neither are pressing enough for the government to waste even a second’s sleep worrying about their lack of implementation.

    I don’t know (does anyone?) yet whether this measure will be in a Bill of its own or lumped in with other changes.

    If the former, it can basically sit there moldering in the Senate for ever – either as a DD trigger which can be pulled at any time (although the government already has one of those and will soon accrue a few more even under the new Senate) or just as something to bash the Opposition over the head with (not very effectively, as I can’t see anyone other than medical researchers lobbying for its passage).

    If the latter, it will depend on the bundle.

    But the way the government has allocated the funds from this measure is very strange, and suggests that the push for it is more ideological than driven by necessity.

    Now, of course any attack on Medicare is inherently ideological, but to attack Medicare in this way – by suggesting a co payment but then using the funds raised by it in such a way that there won’t be any real incentive to implement it – seems to be a case of running the flag up the pole and seeing who salutes, rather than a serious intent to implement it.

  • 130
    sohar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:51 am | Permalink

    Bemused,
    I’m sure the Age has always listed Carlton as a columnist, as they do with other SMH writers, but he has been “disappeared” now by the Spencer St Kremlin.

  • 131
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:52 am | Permalink

    zoomster

    It is simple. It is just the first step to changing the perception of medicare. Slowly introduce extra costs to erode its universality.

  • 132
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:54 am | Permalink

    victoria@100

    Darn

    The Libs narrative is that labor left a debt and defiict mess. They wish to lay the blame squarely at Labor’s feet.
    The gold plated PPL is an albatross round Abbott’s neck. He seems to think that every other promise can be broken cos of Labor, but not his PPL

    Labor needs to make it clear that the economic parameters that matter most are NOT debt and deficit and that they were NOT the cause of the GFC and its impact on Australia.

    An economic slowdown or worse, a recession is caused by an inadequate level of demand in the economy and ONLY government can make up that shortfall and keep the economy going.

    A result is that, until private investment and consumer demand picks up and tax revenue is restored to normal, the budget will be in deficit and it is imperative that it should be.

  • 133
    sohar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:55 am | Permalink

    Victoria,
    The confusion is with forget, forgot, forgotten – but get, got, got.

  • 134
    MTBW
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:55 am | Permalink

    sceptic

    PUP may be the answer!

  • 135
    rossmcg
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    Thomas. Paine

    The Tories probably still believe that the best way to drive down wages is to create unemployment. And the best way to encourage the unemployed to work is to deny them benefits.
    But they are yet to discover how to create jobs. That is not in their repertoire.
    What they are good at is creating haves and have nots. That is in their DNA

  • 136
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:59 am | Permalink

    MTBW@116

    bemused @92

    Kelly is up to something this is not the first time she has criticised the Libs – she has had a couple of goes at them of late.

    I am wondering is she would run as an independant – can’t see her being endorsed by the ALP.

    Se would first need to do a period of penance, join the ALP and prove herself.

    Not likely, but stranger things have happened.

  • 137
    Greensborough Growler
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:02 pm | Permalink

    bemused,

    Your comments epitomise my point about why RCs are an inadequte tool for investigating such things.

    You make a number of contentious assertions about apportioning blame, you use your ever accurate 20-20 hindsight to exercise your overused “holier than thou” muscle and make a contestable proclamation which you solemnly expect every one to take seriously.

    In short it’s your opinion and you interpret the evidence to suit your outlook on the matter. That is your right.

    However, whether an adversarial style judicial inquiry actually identified the real problems and came up with implementable recommendations is something I doubt.

  • 138
    Tom the first and best
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:03 pm | Permalink

    130

    The Age has moved from Spencers St (on the corner of Lonsdale St) to Collins St opposite Southern Cross (just west of Spencers St).

  • 139
    gloryconsequence
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:03 pm | Permalink

    Darn

    Whenever the next election is held, either as a DD or in 2016, I think the biggest scare campaign the Labor party could run is the threat of an increase in the GST. It would be rat poison to the Liberals because Abbott’s denials will no longer be believed after this budget fiasco. He has absolutely no credibility left.

    Can you imagine the average Australian giving their assent to widening the GST to include everything it doesn’t presently cover, and/or lifting the rate to 15% or more? I can’t. With all the criticism of the Abbott government that states are bound to come out with now, following the dumping of all education and health expenditure in their laps, if Labor plays its cards right, it should just about be able to turn the next election into a referendum on the GST – one that the liberals couldn’t possibly win.

    Labor wont need to bring up the fear of a GST – it will be the Liberal platform for re election. And saying it is a battle they cant win is both incorrect and naive.

  • 140
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:06 pm | Permalink

    133
    sohar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 11:55 am | PERMALINK
    Victoria,
    The confusion is with forget, forgot, forgotten – but get, got, got.

    Got it :D

  • 141
    Atticus
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:06 pm | Permalink

    Abbott and Hockey’s new Australia based on the American model where 40-50 million on food stamps, a working poor and a nation of part time workers...

    During the past decade I’ve spent considerable time in America cities in 4 Western states, and it is ineffably depressing to encounter dozens of beggars every CBD block, something unheard of during my childhood days there. America’s working poor, or precariate as Chomsky calls them, know all too well how very close they are to falling into destituteness.

  • 142
    NathanA
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:11 pm | Permalink

    Zoomster 129

    But the details of the fund, and how it will distribute the funds, have not been made clear to medical researchers. In itself that’s quite remarkable, because the mechanism of distributing NHMRC funds is currently a huge burden on medical researchers. Without more detail, it’s hard to see them gaining enough support for researchers to become vocal in defending it, save for a few cherry-picked media tarts. So I’m with you, either the fund was dreamt up a week ago, or it’s a bargaining chip.

  • 143
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:13 pm | Permalink

    ShowsOn@110


    Interesting idea on renewable energy …


    Pie in the sky fairyland crap.

    We need to be investing NOW in technologies that we know work, not unproven rubbish that may turn out to cost a fortune.

    This is just as bad as people like Greg Hunt who just assert that clean coal will save us without any evidence to back up that claim.

    It is kind of like a proven technology which works on such a tower with hot air at the base rising, http://tinyurl.com/osaadtg except it reverses the air flow. I don’t think it is far fetched at all.

    The problem with the solar tower technology, which has been proposed in Australia, http://tinyurl.com/my9aym is that it requires a lot of capital and is viable only if interest rates are low. Hmmmm isn’t that the case right now?

  • 144
    lefty e
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Mike Carlton is right. THough all our political elites lie,there really is not precendet for the scale of mendacity Abbott has just produced.

    He really is the biggest liar in 50 years of Australian political history.

    I mean lets just start here:

    No cuts to education, no cuts to health, no change to pensions, no change to the GST and no cuts to the ABC or SBS.

    Oh sorry did I say no cuts. I meant EIGHTY BILLION in cuts. The BIGGEST CUTS in federal funding OF ALL TIME.

    Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/tony-abbotts-name-is-mud-20140515-zrd9w.html#ixzz31w2L53qp

  • 145
    Tom Hawkins
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:16 pm | Permalink

    Great initiative from the Victorian opposition

    Victoria's Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews has vowed to establish Australia's first royal commission into family violence if Labor is elected later this year.

    The commission would be established early next year, and Mr Andrews has promised to implement all of its recommendations.

    Victorians will vote in a state election in November.

    Speaking at the Labor Party's state conference in Melbourne, Mr Andrews described family violence as a "national emergency".

    "We have to admit that if women and their children were being systematically tormented by total strangers, we would be quick to act. We would do more," he said.

    "What are the politicians doing? Well, we are posing for photographs and we are wearing a ribbon, but we are not asking the really hard questions.

    "Some people think the chief duty of a government is to maintain law and order. Well, the biggest law and order issue in our state is unfolding inside our homes."

    Mr Andrews said, if established, the commission would have a broad brief.

    "It will investigate criminal law, corrections and the courts," he said.
    Violence knows no boundaries

    While many people watched the Simon Gittany murder trial with a sense of sorrow, for Kay Schubach it was far more personal.

    "It will look at support services, the health system, alcohol and drug treatment. It will look at refuges, housing and education.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-17/daniel-andrews-pledges-royal-commission-into-family-violence/5459566

  • 146
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:16 pm | Permalink

    sohar@121

    Victoria,
    You were right the first time – the accepted past participle for “get” is “got” these days. Maybe “gotten” is American.

    “Gotten” is yet another ugly Americanism that is starting to pollute our language.

  • 147
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:18 pm | Permalink

    Atticus@122

    Bemused,
    Thanks for last night’s link to to Carlton’s brilliant barrage. It helped me to sleep soundly knowing that not the all of the SMH mediacrats are too scared to go the mongrel on Abbott’s budget.

    By the way, SMH could use some hard-hitting headlines and cartoons from Fairfax-owned ‘Illawarra Mercury’, which has a new editor who dropped their exasperating false-equivalence of the past decade.

    Hi Atticus. Well I am glad at least one person benefited from my link.

    BTW, drawing on a comment yesterday about your experience in Vietnam, are you a former US citizen who migrated here?

  • 148
    sohar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

    Tom, I know the Age has moved, but I will always associate it with one of the world’s ugliest buildings (not that the Kremlin is).

  • 149
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    Greensborough Growler@137

    bemused,

    Your comments epitomise my point about why RCs are an inadequte tool for investigating such things.

    You make a number of contentious assertions about apportioning blame, you use your ever accurate 20-20 hindsight to exercise your overused “holier than thou” muscle and make a contestable proclamation which you solemnly expect every one to take seriously.

    In short it’s your opinion and you interpret the evidence to suit your outlook on the matter. That is your right.

    However, whether an adversarial style judicial inquiry actually identified the real problems and came up with implementable recommendations is something I doubt.

    How is recalling some of the RC evidence exercising my “ever accurate hindsight” or “holier than thou” muscle?

    No need to take me seriously, just take what came out of the RC seriously.

  • 150
    Steven Grant Haby
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    Atticus @ 141

    I have spoken to a number of people in my local community who have emigrated from the U.S.A. to seek a better life for them and their families. One person lived in a relatively well to do area of California and was shocked at the huge increase in poverty in recent years in their home town.

    The person commented that Abbott was heading down the path of the Tea Party in the U.S.

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