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Seats of the week: Fadden and Moncrieff

This week’s Seat of the Week double-up accounts for the northern two-third of the Gold Coast, served by Liberal National Party members Stuart Robert and Steven Ciobo.

Fadden

Teal and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for the LNP and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Fadden covers the northern part of the Gold Coast municipality, from Gaven and Labrador in the south through Coomera, Pimpama and Ormeau to Logan River in the north, with the Pacific Motorway forming most of its western boundary. This area’s intensive population growth has caused the electorate to be progressively drawn into the Gold Coast since its creation in 1977, at which time it contained none of its present territory, instead covering outer southern Brisbane and the Gold Coast’s rural hinterland. The redistribution caused by the expansion of parliament in 1984 drew it into Brisbane, extending as far northwards as Salisbury and Rochedale, with the Logan River as its southern boundary. It first infringed upon the Gold Coast when it acquired Coomera at the 1996 election, the migration being completed with the exchange of Redland Bay in the north for Southport in the south at the 2004 election. The ongoing population explosion caused it to shed nearly 14,000 voters inland of its current boundary at the most recent Queensland redistribution before the 2010 election.

With the exception of 1983, Fadden in its various guises has been won at every election by the conservatives, meaning the the Liberal Party prior to the 2010 merger and the Liberal National Party thereafter. The inaugural member was Don Cameron, who had held Griffith for the Liberals since 1966. The 1975-engorged margin was whittled away at the 1977 and 1980 elections, then overturned with David Beddall’s victory for Labor with the election of the Hawke government. Cameron returned to parliament a year later at a by-election caused by Jim Killen’s retirement in Moreton, which became the third seat he represented. The 1984 redistribution made Fadden notionally Liberal, causing David Beddall to jump ship for Rankin. The seat was then won for the Liberals by David Jull, who had held the seat of Bowman from 1975 until his defeat in 1983. Jull’s margins were less than 5% until 1996, but generally well into double digits thereafter.

Jull was succeeded on his retirement at the 2007 election by Stuart Robert, a former army intelligence officer. Robert was said to have played a role in “rounding up support” for Tony Abbott ahead of his challenge to Malcolm Turnbull’s leadership in December 2009, and was elevated afterwards to shadow parliamentary secretary in the defence portfolio. He was further promoted after the 2010 election to the outer shadow ministry portfolio of defence science, technology and personnel, which was rebadged as Assistant Defence Minister following the 2013 election victory.

Moncrieff

Teal numbers indicate two-party majority for the LNP. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Moncrieff covers the central Gold Coast from Miami north through Surfers Paradise to Nerang Head, and inland to Nerang and Highland Park. The seat was created with the expansion of parliament in 1984, previous to which the entirety of the Gold Coast had been accommodated by McPherson since 1949, and by Moreton beforehand. Moncrieff originally extended deep into rural territory at Beaudesert, before assuming its current coastal orientation with Beaudesert’s transfer to Forde in 1996. Prior to Moncrieff’s creation the entirety of the Gold Coast had been accommodated by McPherson, which had itself been created with the previous expansion of parliament in 1949. The Gold Coast had originally been contained within the electorate of Moreton, which has since migrated into Brisbane’s southern suburbs. The area has had conservative representation without interruption since 1906, with McPherson passing from Country Party to Liberal Party control in 1972, and Moncrieff being in Liberal and more recently Liberal National Party hands since its creation.

Steven Ciobo assumed the seat at the 2001 election after the retirement of its inaugural member, Kathy Sullivan, who had previously been a Senator since 1974, establishing what remains a record as the longest serving female member of federal parliament. Ciobo emerged through Liberal ranks as a member of the Right faction, associated with former ministers Santo Santoro and Warwick Parer and state party powerbroker Michael Caltabiano. He rose to the shadow ministry in the small business portfolio after the defeat of the Howard government, which was elevated to a shadow cabinet position when Malcolm Turnbull ascended to the leadership in September 2008. However, he was demoted to the outer shadow ministry portfolios of tourism, arts, youth and sport when Tony Abbott became leader in December 2009 and relegated to the back bench after the August 2010 election, which was generally reckoned to be a consequence of his support for Turnbull. Following the 2013 election victory he won promotion to parliamentary secretary to the Treasurer.

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  • 301
    J341983
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

    What he’s using is nuance… he’s not saying “never ever will we support a GST-increase”, which would be stupid on multiple levels.

    You can read between the lines and see what you like, but I don’t see “we want to increase the GST” in it.

  • 302
    Steve777
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    I wonder when Workchoicess will be reintroduced? Abbott swore blind that it wouldn’t be, which to me is a pretty solid indication that it will. Perhaps he’ll set up a committee of executives from big corporations to advise him on the changes they want to industrial relations. There are a few points on the IPAs checklist that Abbott hasn’t got around to yet, e.g. 53, 54, 83, 84, 85

    http://ipa-wishlist.com/the-list
    http://ipa.org.au/publications/2080/be-like-gough-75-radical-ideas-to-transform-australia

  • 303
    dave
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    Tricot@299

    I don’t think that Labor can be too precious about the GST.

    It was always on the cards with Paul K and that fact that he nailed Hewson and what was, in long 20/20 hindsight, the way to go, a case of strong politics over weak.

    Labor can and should be precious about the GST.

    Why ? Because after examining it, Hawke stopped it from becoming law.

    Labor didn’t introduce it and have said many many times they will not agree to it being raised or broadened.

    Members would revolt if Bowen tried.

    Bowen BTW wants to be the next Labor Treasurer – and in line as a PM down the track – so being seen as trying to get a GST increase up is the last thing he should be contemplating – as well for the fact its a lousy tax.

    The most powerful argument that its a lousy tax is the queue of tories trying to make it bigger.

  • 304
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    Tomorrow Fran Kelly ill interview Abbott on Insiders. I expect a footrub, but will she ask him about the GST?

  • 305
    Simon Katich
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

    Poroti,

    I agree. I just wrote 3 paragraphs on it but I am a bit over the whole analysing leader stuff. I dont think we have a clue what the swinging voter wants to see in a leader for the next election and I dont think they do either as yet. Let Bill do it his way (and let the shadow ministry play their part). Better he be himself as much as possible than try to be someone he is not.

  • 306
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

    dave
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    BW – Anything in particular going in the Philippines atm to make it any more dangerous then ‘usual’ ?

    Mostly the opposite in fact. There is some sort of agreement for semi-autonomy in Mindanao. This cost around 150,000 lives to establish. So it is all good.

    The biggest destabilisers ATM, IMHO, are:

    (1) possible large capital outflows

    (2) China continuing to slap sudden, unilateral, and extremely damaging trade sanctions in the de facto War of the South China Sea. Most recent example: China put a total halt to the Philippines banana trade when the Philippines decided to call the Spratleys, the ‘Western Philippines Islands.’

    (3) the forthcoming POTP elections. Aquino has, IMHO, been pretty good. Those queuing up to take his place may not meet his standards, IMHO.

  • 307
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:28 pm | Permalink

    Kelly should ask Abbott why he killed, buried AND cremated his credibility.

  • 308
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar

    Touche’

  • 309
    badcat
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    victoria

    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    Tomorrow Fran Kelly ill interview Abbott on Insiders.

    ———————————————

    A freudian slip, Victoria – I think its us who will be *ILL* if we can stomach watching it ;)

  • 310
    dave
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:31 pm | Permalink

    BW – Ta.

    did you see this -

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-15/philippines-releases-photos-chinas-construction-disputed-south-china-sea

    As well as in Vietnamese water -

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-13/china-deploys-submarine-near-vietnam-oil-rig-86-vessels-now-present

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-12/chinas-oil-rig-gambit-south-china-sea-game-changer

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-14/vietnamese-mob-burns-foreign-factories-anti-china-riots

    Taking a leaf out of comrade Putin’s book ?

  • 311
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:31 pm | Permalink

    badcat

    More likely just another in my long list of typos, but I will happily go with freudian slip. :D

  • 312
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    DOING IT TOUGH BUT MAKING A CONTRIBUTION

    From Anthony Klan in ‘The Weekend Australian’

    ‘JOE Hockey is perhaps the richest treasurer since Edward “Red Ted” Theodore of the 1930s, with property estimated to be worth well over $10 million.

    ‘Searches show the austerity budget measures will have a limited impact on the Treasurer and his family, who live in a Sydney mansion worth $6m, own a beachside home south of Sydney and have Queensland cattle properties worth more than $2m.

    …most of Mr Hockey’s assets were accumulated by his multi-millionaire investment banker wife. The main Hockey home in Sydney’s elite Hunters Hill was bought in 2004 in the name of Mr Hockey’s wife, Melissa Babbage, for $3.5m.

    Property agents yesterday estimated the expansive, 1906-built home would be worth between $5m and $6m in today’s market.

    Also owned by Ms Babbage is a six-bedroom, two-bathroom home at the prized beach enclave of Stanwell Park, south of Sydney. Ms Babbage paid $782,500 for the property in 2002 and it is currently estimated to be worth more than $1.5m. The Hockeys also own several cattle properties at Malanda, in north Queensland. Those properties, which run cattle and include a house, are estimated to be worth $2.5m or more. In addition to those property assets, the Hockeys hold a family trust and a self-managed super fund.

    Under budget measures, Mr Hockey’s pay will be frozen for a year, along with that of all parliamentarians, and his access to business-class travel on the public purse when he retires will be severely curtailed…

    Mr Hockey’s parliamentary income is $365,868, calculated on a base salary of $195,130, plus 87.5 per cent for holding the position of Treasurer. Under the high-income earner tax levy of 2 per cent on each dollar earned above $180,000, Mr Hockey would pay a levy of $3717.

    Included in Mr Hockey’s pecuniary interests register is a home in the ACT owned jointly by Mr Hockey and Ms Babbage’

  • 313
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    Re Palmer and Murdoch
    ________________
    The unending Murdoch campaign,notable in the Oz against Palmer …is remarkable for the spate of ,articles ,cartoons,etc… the lot.. against Palmer
    The word must have come down fron On High and they slavishly follow the Old Monsters dictums..it’s what they are paid to do…The Oz is run by Murdoch ,the way Stalin ran Pravda

    I note that Palmer uses every chance he gets on the media to slate Murdoch
    I recently heard him speak of the “Murdoch sewer” WOW

    Murdoch’s mate Abbott must be in Pamer’s sights too…and after all… these policies arethose of the IPA_Murdoch to a tee

    On a tweet recently Murdoch deplored the welfare state here and in the UK,and Hockey is following that line

    But Palmer is shrewd and will harvest the resentment and the “anti-politician” wave that is now running strongly…and this must worry Newman greatly.who is an enemy of Palmer’s too
    The talk=backs have run hot against Hockey/Abbott

    I think Palmer is genuine in his concern for pensioners and the poor…and this helps soften any resentment against him as a Millionaire politician

    I think he will be a power of harm to Abbott and the Libs,and might so worry the B-Benchers that it may bring Abt down him down as bad polls unfold..and the Libs are swept out in Vic in Nov
    The best news that we could get at the moment is that “The Angel of Death ” has taken Rupert to that place in Hell alongside Dr Goebells(it’s reserved I understand for him)

  • 314
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:35 pm | Permalink

    Dave

    Yes. It is very concerning. Putin, Abe, Xi, Modi are all, IMHO, dangerous players. They all have form in terms of spilling petrol and waving matches around.

    We live in interesting times.

    The best thing Australia has got going for it, in terms of Indonesian-Australian relations is that the Chinese have put some sort of claim on the Riau Archipelago (the one north of Kalimantan, not the one just south of Singapore).

  • 315
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:37 pm | Permalink

    deblonay

    Dont know if you saw this, but Clive has a fair bit to say about the Murdoch media

    This was posted on previous thread. Clive Palmer interviewed after budget. Worth reposting

    http://youtu.be/Cd6WXBzXyB4

  • 316
    don
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    Jackol@297

    ‘gotten’ is a perfectly legitimate word.

    Just because some English people have forgotten how to properly conjugate one of their own words doesn’t mean casual American-bashing is warranted.

    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=gotten&searchmode=none

    Thanks very much for that, much appreciated.

    I’ll add “forgotten”, “begotten”, and “misbegotten” to my mental list of ‘gotten’ derivatives.

    Gotten is a lovely word, rolls off the tongue.

  • 317
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    don
    I think you may have gotten ahead of yourself with that one.

  • 318
    Steve777
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

    Is Clive Palmer ‘Liberal Lite’? The Liberal you have when you’re not having a Liberal? He does seem to be planning to harvest disgruntled Liberal votes that might otherwise go to Labor, the Greens or a micr party, as well as gather disgruntled Labor voters. Is he a traditional Liberal more in the mode of pre-Howard Liberal Governments – someone who stayed closer to the centre when his colleagues stampeded to the far right? Remember that Fraser was regarded as a right wing economic radical when he first became Liberal leader. Today’s ‘Liberals’ regard Fraser as practically a Communist.

    Or is Palmer just a main chancer?

  • 319
    Steve777
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

    Also ‘ill-gotten’.

  • 320
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:47 pm | Permalink

    Steve777

    I reckon main chancer

  • 321
    don
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar@317

    don
    I think you may have gotten ahead of yourself with that one.

    Nah. Never.

    Found another one!

    un·got·ten (uhn-got-n) Show IPA
    adjective
    1.
    not obtained or gained.

    But I won’t be using that one. It is an awkward word. But scrabble worthy, nevertheless.

  • 322
    Steve777
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:52 pm | Permalink

    Re Victoria @320 – I suspect you’re right.

    Although if Rupert Murdoch is against him he can’t be too bad.

  • 323
    badcat
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    don

    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar@317

    don
    I think you may have gotten ahead of yourself with that one.

    Nah. Never.

    Found another one!

    un·got·ten (uhn-got-n) Show IPA
    adjective
    1.
    not obtained or gained.

    But I won’t be using that one. It is an awkward word. But scrabble worthy, nevertheless.

    ———————————————

    What about that famous race horse scandal ??? – the Fine Gotten affair in 1984 :)

  • 324
    poroti
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar

    . Putin, Abe, Xi, Modi are all, IMHO, dangerous players

    Agreed . But the starter’s gun for them was fired by Dubya. Five seconds after Dubya cried “terrsm” to justify post 9/11 actions the Chinese launched a nasty crackdown also crying “terrsm”.The Russkiy in the Caucuses were not too far behind.

    With the ball set rolling we arrive to a time where when we in the “West” crying out about invasion, torture (enhanced interrogation) , indefinite detention without trial and extra judicial killings look more a little bit hypocritical. Fuack the war mongers of the world.

  • 325
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

    Carlton’s piece is featured on the top left area of fhe Age online. Check out how many comments it has attracked. Over 750!

  • 326
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

    Steve777

    I really want to believe Palmer is one of the good guys. He hits all the right notes, but is he just gaming the electorate?

  • 327
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

    Dave 31O re Comrade
    _______________
    The term “comrade ” hasn’t been used since the fall of the Socuet Union…a long time now

    The Russian Govt is a most conservative /nationist one, and the communist past is now very much in the past

    The Communist Party is in fact the main opposition to Putin..to little effect.. I’m sure they still say Comrade to each other
    A US mag has recently looked at Putin success in harvesting this nationist vote and alse the massive vote of dwellers in the country and small towns
    The article says he is similar to Richard Nixon rather than Stalin(with a touch of JOh B Peterson in the rural areaa

    He has also harvested the hostility against the urban(Moscow/St Petersburg)) middle class intellectuals,who were full-on for The Free Market -US styl;e after the fall of Gorbechov,and who have loved The West on their many excursions to Paris and who speak of the “rurals” as”Aborigines”..yes that word…and in turn are detested
    Just as the Libs deride “cafe latte ” inner suburbanites

    The article and intertesting picture of the reasons for Putin high popularity /national pride restored/anti-western in a long Russian tradition/anti-gay like smong the religious right here /and generous payments to pensioners who lost much in the inflation under Yeltsin

    As I said a bit like Nixon in the USA
    I’ll post the US article which is most informative,and gives a better picture than the ignorant ritual russophobia whish often occurs here

  • 328
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

    Oops here

    http://www.theage.com.au

  • 329
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

    poroti
    I am just back from looking at an exhibition in the National Gallery called ‘The Eastern Garden’: photographs from the NEI c 1860 to c 1940.

    Very interesting for this old colonial!

    But the most interesting was contrasting the world of just 75 years ago with the world of today.

    No wonder there are hordes of elderly white male Golden Age nostalgia desperates creating Tea Parties.

  • 330
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

    Wish Prissy Pyne would just disappear

    http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/christopher-pyne-accuses-students-of-assaulting-julie-bishop-20140517-38gfa.html

  • 331
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

    http://pando.com/2014/05/14/sorry-america-the-ukraine-isnt-all-about-you/
    For dave …..The Mark Ames article on Russia in a US journal

  • 332
    daretotread
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:01 pm | Permalink

    Victoria
    Palmer’s background is very unusual and it is quite possible he was raised with a social conscience – even a socialist conscience. I am not sure but he did visit CHINA when a child in the 60s and that is very, very very and then triple very unusual.

  • 333
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:02 pm | Permalink

    dtt

    I will try to keep an open mind on Palmer, but i am yet to be convinced

  • 334
    Steve777
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

    Good to see Mike Carlton’s piece given prominence of The Age site. It has an astonishing 751 comments.

    Re Clive – one thing is certain – he’s a good deal better than Abbott, Hockey and company, which I am starting to regard as positively evil. Certainly Palmer’s promises don’t add up, but he’ll never have to implement them.

    If he makes life difficult for Abbott and increases the probability that Abbott’s government will be restricted to one term, then he’d have done a lot of good. The enemy of one’s enemy and so forth.

  • 335
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:06 pm | Permalink

    Deblonay

    Still extolling the virtues of Tovarisch Putin, are we?

    I suppose you are happy that the gays who have been swept under Putin’s control in the Crimea (we are not talking democracy here) will now be:

    (1) illegal by definition
    (2) vilified as a matter of Putin’s offical policy
    (3) harrassed by stray homophobes
    (4) bashed by uniformed members of Putin’s state apparatus
    (5) pissed on by bovver boys empowered by Putin
    (6) murdered without the law bothering its head about the perpetrators.

    Or do you consider that what is happening to Crimea’s gays merely human collateral damage in Putin’s fully-justified imperial war against international zionists and the US? The latter have, of course, forced Putin to grab the Crimea against his will.

  • 336
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

    Let Bill do it his way (and let the shadow ministry play their part). Better he be himself as much as possible than try to be someone he is not.

    No matter how much Michael Gordon seeks to turn Bill Shorten into a firebrand ratbag politician like Abbott, I doubt whether the public will see him that way.

    Shorten, either deliberately or not, is regarded as mild-mannered and thoughtful.

    Labor people – at least up until a day or so ago – thought him to be too thoughtful.

    Coalition supporters saw him as some kind of mindless union ladder-climber who got where he is because it was his turn. No passion, that’s for sure, just turning up.

    But Bill Shorten is exactly the person needed to counterbalance Abbott. If Shorten wasn’t a real person, then we’d have had to invent him.

    Abbott is the muckmenter and the aggravator, the one who throws a spanner into every works, who creates chaos and confusion, who lies and deceives his way to get through to the end of the day. He’s a bull in his own china shop.

    Shorten, relatively reserved and slow to passion doesn’t vent on every issue.

    But the other night, in the Budget Reply, he did. That’s why he received such an enthusiastic round of applause… because when Bill Shorten gets angry, you know something’s really bad.

    Once the “Budget Emergency” myth is dispelled (and yes, Clive Palmer is doing a good job, probably because of his business background), then the Coalition have their main foundation ripped out from underneath them.

    Without a Budget Emergency, there is no need for so-called emergency measures. We don’t have to chop up the furniture anymore and shovel it into the boiler to make more steam. The existence (or not) of the Budget Emergency is the absolute front line of the political battle and Abbott’s mob are losing the skirmishes, and maybe the battle. It’s their weakest point and they’ve based everything on it.

    If Bill’s calm and steady approach convinces the punters they can trust Labor, and perhaps even hanker for it a little – after they’ve seen the Abbott Reality – then he’s doing exactly the job that needs to be done.

  • 337
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:10 pm | Permalink

    Deblonay

    Let’s say that 5% of Crimeans are gay and/or bi.

    That is 5% of 2,400,000 Crimeans.

    That’s around 120,000 gays who have become instantly illegal.

    And it is all the fault of the US satanic empire! And the Zionists!

  • 338
    MTBW
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:12 pm | Permalink

    Steve777

    I agree with you on Palmer.

    He gives every impression to me that he loathes Abbott and Co.

    He is a self made man with a social conscience and while he may not support any Party openly I think he would vote with the ALP when it comes down to it!

    He will mess with Abbott’s head because he likes the sport of it.

    He is no fool!

  • 339
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

    Deblonay

    Around 600,000 Ukrainians instantly became Russian as well.

    That wicked, wicked Obama! All the way from Washington he forced Putin to force 600,000 Ukrainians to turn into instant citizens of Czar Putin’s domains.

    But I am guessing, Deblonay, that you don’t give a rat’s arse about real humans. You just trot out the old black and white stuff; the four legs good and two legs bad stuff.

  • 340
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:18 pm | Permalink

    Meh.

    Palmer is just another old white male filthy rich mining magnate who is stupid enough to think that he knows more climate science than 97% of the world’s climate scientists.

    What’s more, he is fully prepared to deliver the tritest of scientifically-illiterate one liners to demonstrate the full breadth and depth of his climate science ignorance.

    Not only that, but for an investment of less than $30,000,000 he has a controlling stake in our democracy and hence, presumably, what Australia is going to really do about one erstwhile prime minister correctly identified as the number one moral challenge of our generation.

  • 341
    confessions
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:18 pm | Permalink

    Good to see Mike Carlton’s piece given prominence of The Age site. It has an astonishing 751 comments.

    I guess that explains the absence of PB’s coalition spruikers.

  • 342
    confessions
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:19 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar:

    I agree with you about Palmer.

  • 343
    poroti
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar

    I know what you mean. Back in the 1980′s I had the opportunity to visit on a few occasions the Singapore Cricket Club. Brit colonial central , along with the Raffles.

    Billiards ? Full size tables with 3 piece suited white gloved locals scoring, placing balls and chalking cues for players. Sitting out on the wrought iron balustraded balcony with the slowly turning fans , waited on by more suited servants,gazing across the huge green field where Mountbatten accepted the Japanese surrender one well remembered thinking “FARK it must have been good to be a “Chap” in the colonial old days !” .

  • 344
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:23 pm | Permalink

    poroti

    Yes. But some of us working families did it really tough. I only had two nannies.

  • 345
    J341983
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:24 pm | Permalink

    @342 … the Coalition-fondlers have been notable by their absence since the Budget.

  • 346
    MTBW
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

    J341983

    Haven’t they just! Maybe after Thursday night reply has sent them into hiding.

  • 347
    Jackol
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

    No one should count Palmer as one of the ‘good guys’.

    He may line up against the worst of the tea party LNP agenda, and I will welcome whatever he does in that regard, but his entire political existence is based on getting what he wants for his own personal empire.

    He started out trying to be a mover and shaker in the LNP, but when that turned sour and he didn’t get his train line he bought his own political party seats.

  • 348
    confessions
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:30 pm | Permalink

    the Coalition-fondlers have been notable by their absence since the Budget.

    Aye. Some things simply cannot be defended it would seem.

  • 349
    Boerwar
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:32 pm | Permalink

    ‘the Coalition-fondlers have been notable by their absence since the Budget’

    Perhaps they are retractile?

  • 350
    poroti
    Posted Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 4:35 pm | Permalink

    Boerwar

    OMG only 2 nannies . No cooks , housekeepers and gardeners ? Lordy the colonial Boerwars did it tough.

    Not to worry there has been suggestions on several occasions that will allow Strayan colonials to have the “Boerwar Experience” . Childcare problem ? The Answer ? Bringing in lots of El Cheapo Asian nannies are the answer ………apparently.

Womens Agenda

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Smart Company

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StartupSmart

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Property Observer

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