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Seat of the week: Leichhardt

Electorally volatile in recent times, the far north Queensland seat of Leichhardt has generally gone the way of the winning party at elections in the modern era, an exception being present incumbent Warren Entsch’s win for the Liberal National Party after he returned from retirement in 2010.

Teal and red numbers respectively indicate booths with two-party majorities for the LNP and Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

Leichhardt consists of the northernmost part of Queensland, including Cairns at its southern extremity along with Cape York Peninsula and the Torres Strait Islands. Naturally marginal Cairns provides it with about two-thirds of its voters, the remainder coming from conservative-leaning rural areas along the coast immediately to the north, and Labor-voting indigenous communities beyond. The electorate ranks sixth out of the nation’s 150 electorates for the highest proportion of indigenous persons, behind the two Northern Territory electorates, neighbouring Kennedy, Durack in northern Western Australia, and Parkes in interior New South Wales. Another distinguishing features is a large number of voters over 55, reflecting the popularity of Cairns as a retirement haven.

The electorate was created with the expansion of parliament in 1949, prior to which its area was mostly accommodated by Herbert until 1934 and Kennedy thereafter. Herbert and then Kennedy were in Labor hands from 1928 to 1949, but Leichhardt was narrowly won by the Country Party at its inaugural election, which saw the Menzies government come to power. However, Labor won the seat at the subsequent election in 1951, and it remained in the party fold until David Thomson gained it for the National Country Party amid Labor’s statewide debacle of 1975. Warren Entsch became the seat’s first Liberal member when he unseated Labor’s Peter Dodd with the defeat of the Keating government in 1996, polling 31.8% to the Nationals candidate’s 20.4%. Entsch suffered only a 0.5% swing at the 1998 election, compared with a statewide swing of 7.2%, and subsequently built his margin up to double figures with swings of 2.3% in 2001 and 3.6% in 2004.

Entsch’s local popularity was further illustrated when he bowed out temporarily at the 2007 election, Labor gaining the seat in his absence with a towering swing of 14.3%, the second biggest of that election after Forde in Brisbane’s outer south. The result also underscored the local eclipse of the Nationals, whose candidate polled only 4.0%. Incoming Labor member Jim Turnour managed only a single term before falling victim at the 2010 election to the combined impact of a statewide Labor rout, which cost them seven out of their existing 15 Queensland seats, and the return from retirement of Warren Entsch. Labor’s margin of 4.1% was easily accounted for by a swing of 8.6%, to which Entsch added a further 1.2% at the 2013 election.

Warren Entsch came to politics after serving in the Royal Australian Air Force from 1969 to 1978, then working as a maintenance fitter and welder, real estate agent, farmer and grazier and company director. After winning election in 1996 and re-election in 1998, he was promoted to parliamentary secretary but thereafter rose no higher, and went to the back bench upon announcing his retirement citing family reasons in 2006. During his subsequent three-year interregnum he was director of Cairns construction company CEC Group and the Australian Rainforest Foundation, but talk soon emerged of a political comeback, first in relation to the 2009 state election and then for his old seat. With this accomplished he served for a term as the Coalition’s chief whip, before relinquishing the position to Philip Ruddock after the 2013 election victory.

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  • 101
    badcat
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    poroti

    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    badcat

    The real people behind the recent takeovers may be starting to show themselves. His demands are probably the most sensible solution.

    “Maliki must first be deposed,” said Mr Dabash. “Then we demand the fragmentation of Iraq into three autonomous regions, with Sunnis, Shia and Kurds sharing resources equally.”

    ———————————————–

    Seems to be a view supported by some others :

    Why America should let Iraq resolve its own crisis

    The US already destroyed the political, economic, and social infrastructure of Iraq. There is no way it should attempt to re-enter this agony. This is not some jihadi apocalypse. In fact, ISIS is establishing the groundwork for what is emerging as a likely federalist structure of Sunni Arab, Shiite Arab, and Kurdish regions – the only way Iraq can survive for the foreseeable future.

    Graham E. Fuller is the former vice chairman of the CIA’s National Intelligence Council.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Global-Viewpoint/2014/0619/Why-America-should-let-Iraq-resolve-its-own-crisis

  • 102
    lefty e
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    LOL of the week goes to the ALP’s 2013 election post-mortem.

    http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/labors-2013-election-loss-selfinflicted-internal-review-finds-20140620-3aizl.html

    What a joke of a report! The Rudd campaign stuffed up the 10 minutes it was given to turn the Titanic around (…surprise!), some complete nonsense about the GRNs ‘exclusively’ attacking the ALP (pretty close to wholly untrue), and no reflection on the state of the polls as they turned from Gillard to Rudd in desperation. Waste of paper!

    Self-inflicted is the only bit they get right.

    Go back and do it again.

  • 103
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

    CTar1@98

    bemused/BK


    Official ordination certificates: $20 Get it now


    Cheap religion! $20 now but $50 next month …

    I got the Christian Morals bit but the Religious bit passed me by when my, very Catholic, father explained to me that the Pope was wrong on Contraception.

    I was about 8 at the time.

    Inattention to detail there CTar1! It is $20 in the US, but $30 elsewhere. Yet again the multi-nationals rip us off. :lol:

    I have much the same attitude to ethics as you but with an Anglican upbringing. I long ago rejected what I refer to as the ‘voodoo’ part of religion.

    My wife is a ‘recovering’ Catholic. :D

  • 104
    confessions
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

    The Rudd campaign stuffed up the 10 minutes it was given to turn the Titanic around

    He and his spear carriers had been whiteanting the govt for 3 years.

    The best thing that could’ve happened has now finally happened with his retirement and departure from the caucus.

  • 105
    poroti
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:31 pm | Permalink

    confessions

    Quite a contrast.

    Barack Obama praises Kiwi prime minister as climate change ally

    The US president, Barack Obama, has praised New Zealand prime minister John Key as a key ally in his crusade to tackle climate change.President says US and New Zealand will work closely together ahead of next year's climate change conference in Paris

    Obama and Key were so cosy the president announced he would visit New Zealand, possibly later this year.

    "I would love to come to New Zealand because I hear it is really nice," Obama said...........We are going to be working with my schedule to see what I can come up with, if not this year, but certainly before the end of my presidency."

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/21/barack-obama-praises-kiwi-prime-minister-as-climate-change-ally

  • 106
    MTBW
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

    lefty e

    What a joke of a report! The Rudd campaign stuffed up the 10 minutes it was given to turn the Titanic around (…surprise!), some complete nonsense about the GRNs ‘exclusively’ attacking the ALP (pretty close to wholly untrue), and no reflection on the state of the polls as they turned from Gillard to Rudd in desperation. Waste of paper!

    Self-inflicted is the only bit they get right.

    Go back and do it again.

    I am with you! It sounds to me that some in the National Campaign team were more than a bit miffed.

    And those who complain do not mention that Rudd gained fifteen seats out of the ashes.

    In saying that I am no fan of Bruce Hawker.

  • 107
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:35 pm | Permalink

    confessions@104


    The Rudd campaign stuffed up the 10 minutes it was given to turn the Titanic around


    He and his spear carriers had been whiteanting the govt for 3 years.

    The best thing that could’ve happened has now finally happened with his retirement and departure from the caucus.

    Predictable.

    And as usual, wRONg.

  • 108
    Puff, the Magic Dragon.
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:35 pm | Permalink

    This is a better ‘map’ of the conflicts and neatly sums up my take on the Middle East. When there is no or even little testosterone fuelled violence, betrayal, bloodshed, battles over resources power and religion and who gets to oppress the women, then someone paint me yellow, because I will be long gone – pushing up daisies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-evIyrrjTTY

  • 109
    Bushfire Bill
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:40 pm | Permalink

    Barack Obama praises Kiwi prime minister as climate change ally

    The US president, Barack Obama, has praised New Zealand prime minister John Key as a key ally in his crusade to tackle climate change.

    The isolation of Abbott as a Climate Change pariah begins…

  • 110
    MTBW
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

    In the last week or two the petition from Change.org re the legal use of medicinal marijuana for seriously ill patients got 140,000 signatures and the State Government is considering the proposal.

    I know some of you on here signed the petition.

    This is his mother’s reply:

    https://mail.google.com/mail/ca/u/0/?shva=1#imp/146bc449c97e3658

  • 111
    confessions
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

    poroti:

    Key and his UK counterpart were never going to side with Abbott in a numpty stance on AGW mitigation.

    It’s just so embarrassing for Australians to be saddled with Abbott as our PM!

  • 112
    poroti
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

    Bushfire Bill

    Tony Abbott will be a very lonely lad in Paris next year. If he bothers to turn up that is.

  • 113
    zoomster
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

    Just met Tim Fischer down the shops. As you do.

  • 114
    Darn
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:47 pm | Permalink

    confessions
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:04 pm | PERMALINK
    A tale of two Prime Ministerial chats with Obama.

    eleanor bloom @eleanorbloom · 3m
    Obama & New Zealand PM John Key discuss 'robust action' against climate change http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-21/obama-discusses-climate-change-with-new-zealand-pm-john-key/5540588 … via @ABCNews

    How absurd that Abbott actually thought Key would join him in a coalition of the UNwilling.

  • 115
    zoidlord
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

    It’s funny that a National Party Leader from New Zealand gives the flick to Tony Abbott’s Alliance.

    Politics don’t work the way on world stage compared his little backroom dealings with donars.

  • 116
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:50 pm | Permalink

    Labor would benefit from espousing the clean energy jobs of the future when talking about climafe change policy

  • 117
    kevjohnno
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

    Greensborough Growler

    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:11 pm | Permalink

    Bemused,

    So your view is that a ratbag with a colander on their head with half cooked spaghetti dangling over their faces is the sort of credible person a teenager with personal problems will want to consult.

    I suspect not.

    Having seen some of the ratbags from the Scripture Union here in Qld I suspect most kids would opt for the pastafarians. I believe they would be making the correct choice too.

  • 118
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

    kevjohnno@117



    Having seen some of the ratbags from the Scripture Union here in Qld I suspect most kids would opt for the pastafarians. I believe they would be making the correct choice too.

    At least the pastafarians have a sense of humour! :lol:

  • 119
    confessions
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:55 pm | Permalink

    Interesting timing of the leaking of this internal party review report, with the state conference coming up in a couple of weeks.

    The Shaping Labor report, a copy of which was leaked to The Weekend West, recommends sweeping reforms to the party's internal processes, including tougher rules around secret ballots for internal voting to end the "ugly" practice of show-and-tell balloting and direct election of Labor's State executive, the party's decision-making branch.

    The reforms, the report's authors argue, would have "major implications for the way factions (unions) organise within the political wing" by weakening the power of factional bosses, who rank-and-file party members perceive are running the party like a "black box".

    The report, commissioned by Labor's administrative committee after the disastrous Senate re-run in April when Joe Bullock was the only senator returned, involved face-to-face talks with almost 500 rank-and-file members at eight town-hall style forums and attracted more than 200 written submissions.

    https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/24287460/labor-report-attacks-union-power/

  • 120
    Diogenes
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:56 pm | Permalink

    The official Labor report seems to be pretty much in keeping with what people here were saying

    Labor’s polling showed that in May last year the Gillard government faced possible swings of 18 per cent in some seats and was on track to hold just 40 seats in the 150-seat House of Representatives. The leadership change from Julia Gillard to Kevin Rudd in June last year saved the party 15 seats, the report argues

  • 121
    poroti
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 12:57 pm | Permalink

    Darn

    The worst of it is that Abbott had not spoken to Key or “Dave” about it before he came out with that piece of crap.

  • 122
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:00 pm | Permalink

    confessions@119

    Interesting timing of the leaking of this internal party review report, with the state conference coming up in a couple of weeks.

    https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/24287460/labor-report-attacks-union-power/

    Has anyone posted it online?

    The intended audience was all party members, but as all too often happens, those who think they know best are suppressing it.

  • 123
    psyclaw
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:01 pm | Permalink

    Bemused, Comrade

    Your #100 is spot on.

    However even amongst psychologists are the occasional fruit loops, religious or otherwise, but at least the formal profession has means of eliminating probly most of them.

    But the most important reason for deploying registered psychologists is that they all work as part of a formal “supervision tree” and depending on training and experience they are supervised or they supervise.

    And even seniors who provide professional supervision to those on lower branches, also recognise the need for and seek supervision from peers when difficult cases or issues emerge.

    Various documents at the Australian Psychological Society website explain how the process works.

  • 124
    victoria
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:04 pm | Permalink

    BRAD NORINGTON THE AUSTRALIAN JUNE 21, 2014 12:00AM

    THE claim by union whistleblower Kathy Jackson that most unions act like she did by transferring large amounts of members’ money to off-the-books “war chests” for spending on almost anything has been dismissed by colleagues who condemn the practice as wrong and possibly ­illegal.

    http://www.twitlonger.com/show/n_1s27405

  • 125
    Diogenes
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:07 pm | Permalink

    I don’t think that it’s necessary to have a qualified psychologist as the first point of call to counsel kids in schools. Obviously you need someone who has a reasonable level of competence in counselling, as long as they know when to refer on a kid.

  • 126
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

    psyclaw@123

    Bemused, Comrade

    Your #100 is spot on.

    However even amongst psychologists are the occasional fruit loops, religious or otherwise, but at least the formal profession has means of eliminating probly most of them.

    But the most important reason for deploying registered psychologists is that they all work as part of a formal “supervision tree” and depending on training and experience they are supervised or they supervise.

    And even seniors who provide professional supervision to those on lower branches, also recognise the need for and seek supervision from peers when difficult cases or issues emerge.

    Various documents at the Australian Psychological Society website explain how the process works.

    Yes, I do occasionally get something right. ;)

    The biggest problem a professional psychologist may face is a client who hides their true feelings and won’t admit to problems and masks symptoms.

    You are pointing to the wisdom of second opinions, but this is not always possible in the school environment where the service is stretched thinly.

  • 127
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:10 pm | Permalink

    Diogenes@125

    I don’t think that it’s necessary to have a qualified psychologist as the first point of call to counsel kids in schools. Obviously you need someone who has a reasonable level of competence in counselling, as long as they know when to refer on a kid.

    A good teacher is the front line service provider. Some are good with kids and matters need go no further.

    But teachers do need someone to refer kids to when they are out of their depth.

  • 128
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:27 pm | Permalink

    School Counsellors are a concept even the American School system gets as gets mentioned in many tv shows and movies.

    They have a counsellor programme not a chaplains one. Except religious schools.

    We can do the same. Counselling by professionals not by a religiously identified person who may or may not be professionally qualified.

  • 129
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    bemused

    Yes I agree with you about teachers. They of course have more face to face time with students.

  • 130
    badcat
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

    Abbott govt offers asylum seekers payment

    The Abbott government is offering to pay asylum seekers up to $10,000 to give up on their bid for resettlement in Australia and return home to the country they fled.

    - See more at: http://www.skynews.com.au/news/top-stories/2014/06/21/abbott-govt-offers-asylum-seekers-payment.html#sthash.25P5i9L3.dpuf

  • 131
    Steve777
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

    May have already been posted – First Dog on chaplains:

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/cartoon/2014/jun/20/first-dog-cartoon-chaplains

  • 132
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

    Return of Chalabi\
    _________________
    Some may remember Akhmed Chalabi,founder in exile of the Iraq National Congress in 2003… and all all-time crook and shonk…but for all that he won the endorsement of Bush in 2003 and for a brief time after the American occupation had hopes of being Irag PM
    By then even the Yanks had woken up to him(and later found out that he was actually on the payroll of the Iranians too)…he made various attempts at power,and got heaps of US money ,..but was later attacked in the US Congress and faded away
    A Shia he later turned up in Iran.for a while…..
    but lo and behold he is back sniffing around in search of power in Baghdad,and may even yet get the endorsement of a Deperate Washington which wants to remove Maliki
    Apparently Iraq is not quite the model democracy that some here claim,and so Chalabi might yet come in out of the cold and become the next PM when the yanks find a way to dump Maliki…(watch your back too,Maliki)

  • 133
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:00 pm | Permalink

    The Age reports on Greensborough Case
    ________________________________
    The Age reports of the concern at the G’Boro Primary school where they have a popular young wsoman,with great quals working with kids in lieu of a chaplain…they are worried that with Abbottt’s demand that only religious chaplains be employed they may lose here services
    a classic case

  • 134
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    Such chaplains wouldn’t be allowed in US schools,as several major Suporeme Court rulings have vetoed ALL religious observances in any “public school “…under the constitution which declares that the US is secular

    The question of prayer in school was a much fought out issue and debared by court ruling,just as was the push for so-cslled”creation-science” which was an attack on the teaching of evolution
    Religious” fundies “and the Tera Party however keep up a constant attacks on the schools

    In the 19th century in Australia…the state educ systems were established as”free.secular and compolsery” after a long period of bitter conflict between various religious groups who wanted religion in schools

    The US Science Teachers Assoc has led the fight in the US in this regard

  • 135
    lizzie
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:14 pm | Permalink

    I found this interesting – a successful marriage.

    http://www.theage.com.au/national/chris-uhlmann-and-gai-brodtmann-a-very-canberra-couple-20140620-3ajmd.html

  • 136
    psyclaw
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:14 pm | Permalink

    Guytaur

    The Yanks have school counsellors and school psychologists. Their roles are quite different.

    Yank “school counsellors” and Australian “school counsellors” are altogether different in role and qualifications. They also have “camp counsellors”, yet another species.

  • 137
    psyclaw
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:24 pm | Permalink

    Diogenes

    It all depends on whether you are referring to counselling or counselling, or indeed counselling, or counselling.

    I suspect you are referring to the former, which of course is the pop definition, ie when someone with avuncular “wisdom” offers advice.

    Other than that I am at a loss to understand just what you mean by “a reasonable level of competence in counselling”.

  • 138
    badseed
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:27 pm | Permalink

    I was just polled by Newspoll down here in Melbourne.

    No questions specifically about Federal politics, unless you count all of the questions about the Australian military (How likely do you think it is that Australia will be attacked by Indonesia or China in the next 20 years?) or the quality of ABC vs Commercial news.

    But I did happily sink the boot into Napthine (‘very dissatisfied’) and gave Daniel Andrews a ‘satisfied’, although I think he’s a bit of an empty suit. Gave my primary to The Greens, and they didn’t ask about other preferences.

    The only issue is that I’m likely moving suburbs before the State election, from Liberal-land (Higgins / Prahran) to lefty-central (Melbourne in both Fed and State), so my vote will probably be worth a bit less.

  • 139
    bemused
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

    psyclaw@137

    Diogenes

    It all depends on whether you are referring to counselling or counselling, or indeed counselling, or counselling.

    I suspect you are referring to the former, which of course is the pop definition, ie when someone with avuncular “wisdom” offers advice.

    Other than that I am at a loss to understand just what you mean by “a reasonable level of competence in counselling”.

    As there is no form of licensing or registration for ‘counsellors’, anyone can hang up their shingle as a ‘counsellor’. Many do, among them the fundy churches and it is a means they use to draw in the vulnerable.

  • 140
    docantk
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

    Roger Bottomley @ 3

    Writs have been issued for the Stafford by-election in Queensland for July 19. Only 2 publicly declared candidates so far (nominations close July 3rd).

    http://www.ecq.qld.gov.au/2014stateByElections.aspx?id=11545

  • 141
    psyclaw
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

    Bemused, Comrade

    You’re going great this arvo……..two things spot on now.

    What you say about “counsellors” and registration is true.

    But there are a few quite large peak associations which offer some level of guarantee that the practitioner is not a total shonk. And some of them have membership eligibility criteria which are of some substance.

    And they do in the main make pretty fair attempts to define what “counselling” is and is not.

    The point remains however that if schools are to have operatives which are formally or even nominally described as “counsellors”, they just can’t do it on the cheap, ethically or legally.

    The minimum standards would require formal qualification criteria, and a system of professional supervision for the protection of the clients and the practitioners.

    In the case of the chaplains, this minimum standard seems to be outsourced to religious groups.

    Sadly I await the first coroners inquest, the subsequent ones, and the 2017? RC into the school chaplaincy service when this shonk program fails to prevent a preventable death, or indeed causes a death.

  • 142
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    Bemused

    Re Fundies
    _______________
    It is a fact that in the USA where there are few or no social welfare program by Govt,the fundy churches run a host of such ,often very useful services for the poor and despersate of which the US has a great many(over 50 million now below the Line)
    Food vouchers/clothing/aid with rents,etc/ a whole range of stuff…and that draws many into their web
    In addition the social life they offer is attractive to many lonely and isolated people
    Despite vast sums spent on it’s various military and imperial activites,there is little Govt money for the poor in the US

  • 143
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    “@ricky_martin: May the itch of a thousand crabs affect the one who ruins your day and may their arms be too short to scratch xD”

    Abbott would be copping a lot :)

  • 144
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    BBC World hust had a health segment.

    It was all about Australia and the effects of plain packaging.

    Made Australia look very good. Thank you Labor and in particular Nicola Roxon.

  • 145
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    @smh: “Vicious and abhorrent”: Ukrainian Catholic church in Western Sydney desecrated with swastika graffiti. http://t.co/ukYltsZwXH

  • 146
    deblonay
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

    US trained ISIS jihardists for war in Syria_____________
    ____________________
    A US base in Jordon was used top train men for war in Syria,and it seems many trained there were jihartdists,now prominent in ISIS the radical group in Iraq

    when will they ever learn ?
    http://presstv.com/detail/2014/06/20/367852/us-trained-isil-at-secret-jordan-base/

  • 147
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

    @tim_chr: Out on the hustings with @Jane_GarrettMP’s sister! Lots of concern about the federal and state budgets. #thisislabor http://t.co/MEh05bLS4k

  • 148
    Diogenes
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

    Other than that I am at a loss to understand just what you mean by “a reasonable level of competence in counselling”.

    The government should have a set of mandatory minimum requirements and demonstrated expertise and experience in childhood counselling.

    There also needs to be some audit to evaluate the effectiveness of the counsellors and if they find one group is less effective, they don’t get their contract renewed.

  • 149
    mexicanbeemer
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    The purposed changes to the FoFA are highly questionable, even the Financial Planning Association of Australia is opposed and have put forward a 10 point plan on how to improve professional standards.

    I think the Banks are correct to call for some flexibility when it comes to retail banking but it appears these changes go further than required and make little sound sense.

    This government appears to be very native, they have no real world experience and it is showing.

  • 150
    guytaur
    Posted Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 3:58 pm | Permalink

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/21/us/presbyterians-debating-israeli-occupation-vote-to-divest-holdings.html?hp&_r=0

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