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The City of Mink: walking through Milan

The City of Mink: walking through Milan

“What is the fatal charm of Italy?  What do we find there that can be found nowhere else?  I believe it is a certain permission to be human, which other places, other countries, lost long ago.” — Erica Jong Binoy Kampmark writes: The city of mink, lying on ladies who seem to have stepped out of […]

A visit to Joyce's beloved Trieste, the 'mongrel city' of Italy

A visit to Joyce's beloved Trieste, the 'mongrel city' of Italy

Freelance writer Grant Doyle writes: The modern day meaning of ‘mongrel’ is somewhat misplaced: etymologically, ‘mong’ means ‘mixture’ while the Old English ‘gemong’ means to ‘mingle’. The contemporary pejorative association comes with the suffix ‘rel’, and shifts the connotative meaning to ‘mixed race’ or ‘person not of pure blood’. Can there be a ‘mongrel’ city? […]

Sunned, stuffed and a little pickled: a trip to Palermo, Sicily

Sunned, stuffed and a little pickled: a trip to Palermo, Sicily

The Sicilian city of Palermo is an astonishing 2,700 years old, originally settled by ancient Phoenicians. In its long history Palermo has been ruled by the Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, and Normans before Italian unification in 1860, and the jumble of influences repeatedly appear throughout Sicilian culture, especially in the island’s wonderful food.

Markets, mandarins and figuring out the seasons: a (food) tour of Europe

Markets, mandarins and figuring out the seasons: a (food) tour of Europe

Jean McBain writes: Andrew and I decided to spend our first year of married life travelling in Europe. Something we’ve always looked for in our travels is interesting food experiences and over the last ten months we’ve certainly had some memorable meals, both for good reasons and bad (one word: airports). Sometimes self-catering means you […]

Slide Night: A tale of two Romes

Slide Night: A tale of two Romes

Rome, the city where tourists live peacefully -- minus their cameras -- with a huge homeless population. It might not always be pretty, but it's interesting, writes Tristan.