Menu
Scroll to top

The Sunday boast

Across the Andes for a glass of wine

Across the Andes for a glass of wine

Lilani Goonesena writes: The drive from Chile’s capital of Santiago to the wine country of Mendoza, Argentina, is truly spectacular. The narrow, two-lane road labours through the winding Andes mountain range, passing ski fields and culminating in 27 steep switchbacks snaking up to the border. Across the border, the road gently slopes down, skirting the magnificent […]

Dios mio, these tacos are worth a trip to New York

Dios mio, these tacos are worth a trip to New York

Today I learned how to cook the tasty dish, Pescado a la Veracruzana, at my favourite Mexican restaurant. That was at midday. It’s nearly midnight in New York and I’m still on a high. Sustaining this level of ecstasy usually costs a lot more than what I paid for lunch.

Dining at the mud buffet

Dining at the mud buffet

 I don’t actually remember being born, but I imagine it probably would have felt something like this. It’s hot, dark and damp, and I’m covered from head to toe in a thick, gooey sludge. With sweat clouding my view, I’m sliding through a suffocating tunnel, crawling desperately towards a light which seems so very far away. […]

Walking through Death Valley, no shadows in sight

Walking through Death Valley, no shadows in sight

While I didn’t manage to find myself there, Death Valley certainly makes you feel small and realise how violent the creation must be of something so spectacular.

Oman: where dolphins and turquoise water meet camels with birth control bags

Oman: where dolphins and turquoise water meet camels with birth control bags

I wondered if the text I’d underlined in the Oman Lonely Planet could possibly be correct. The writer had raved about Oman’s khors-rocky inlets and its pristine beaches, about its windswept deserts and the stark and treeless mountains.

Spring equinox at one of humanity's oldest structures

Spring equinox at one of humanity's oldest structures

Ashley Davis writes: The culture that built the temples of Malta disappeared over four millennia ago, around the time the ancient Egyptians began building pyramids in Giza. The Maltese builders had been at it for two thousand years longer, assembling walls from limestone megaliths. All we know of these ancient builders are the ruins that […]

The bizarre Parisian love for table tennis, Parkour and roller blading

The bizarre Parisian love for table tennis, Parkour and roller blading

Emma Koehn writes: I wanted fancy pastries from Paris, but I got table tennis instead. This fact hit home as I sat marooned by luggage in an eastern Parisian playground, waiting for day three of a by-now routine session of ping pong spectatorship. The French might not acknowledge it, but they sure love alternative sports.

The desolate, windswept moors of Yorkshire

The desolate, windswept moors of Yorkshire

Freelance writer Troy Wilkinson writes: The requirements were simple: A bloke weekend with a close mate, somewhere in Europe we’d both never been, easily accessible for both of us, preferably warm and exotic. Quite how we came up with Yorkshire is a bit of a mystery. But perhaps I’m being a bit harsh on England’s north. […]

Sunned, stuffed and a little pickled: a trip to Palermo, Sicily

Sunned, stuffed and a little pickled: a trip to Palermo, Sicily

The Sicilian city of Palermo is an astonishing 2,700 years old, originally settled by ancient Phoenicians. In its long history Palermo has been ruled by the Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, and Normans before Italian unification in 1860, and the jumble of influences repeatedly appear throughout Sicilian culture, especially in the island’s wonderful food.

Tiptoe through the treetops

Tiptoe through the treetops

Living your very own Indiana Jones adventure isn’t the only attraction luring visitors to Ghana’s Kakum National Park