Topic archives: art

It’s Painting, Stupid! Why Painting Will Never Die

It’s Painting, Stupid! Why Painting Will Never Die

September 23, 2016

Critic and painters stouch, but people will keep on painting.

Photography and the fascination of erotic youth (Henson, Mann, Balthus and Lewis Carroll)

Photography and the fascination of erotic youth (Henson, Mann, Balthus and Lewis Carroll)

June 2, 2010 1

Nov. 2008: left, sign in Paddington (from Bim Bam Boom). May 2010: By this Sunday Bill Henson’s current show will be done and dusted and packed away. Barely a squeak except for M. Devine’s sneery nyah nyah nyah. The pictures went through the censors so they’re all above (the classification) board anyway, no complaints entertained. […]

From ancient Greece, a song of hope and consolation (While you live, shine…)

From ancient Greece, a song of hope and consolation (While you live, shine…)

May 7, 2010

The song of Seikilos is the oldest complete song – music and lyrics – in the western canon, carved in literal stone. The pillar (in Turkey, dated c.200BC–100AD)  announces itself: I am a tombstone, an icon. Seikilos placed me here as an everlasting sign of deathless remembrance. This is the melody: And the lyrics: Hoson […]

Germaine to Aussies on the Wynne “fuss”: It’s all in your mind!

Germaine to Aussies on the Wynne “fuss”: It’s all in your mind!

April 27, 2010 2

Our Germs, Germaine Greer, National Living Expat Treasure and our greatest culture critic*, has decided to join in the Wynne prize fracas (see here) in an article for the Guardian titled: “So an artist found a work on the web, copied it and won an award. Why the fuss?” (*Just last month she won that […]

To draw is to look (kookaburras and cockatoos)

To draw is to look (kookaburras and cockatoos)

April 19, 2010

We were down the coast – and the backyard of our friends’ house was hosting a weekend party of birds: comic cockatoos with sulphur crests, a pair of stern kookaburras and a pair of red parrots, curious at the fuss. It’s a challenge to sketch such fugitive subjects but the point is to observe – […]

Wynne Prize winners 2011, 2012 and news update

Wynne Prize winners 2011, 2012 and news update

April 15, 2010 1

. For yesterday’s Wynne prize discussion including the topics: The sound of embarrassment and protesting too much So next year it will be fine to enter these paintings. Go for it folks: My tuppence Please go here. +++ And in today’s news: Overnight: Art collectors around the world have been in near hysterics as Sothebys […]

A Wynne-lose for Sam Leach and his judges

A Wynne-lose for Sam Leach and his judges

April 14, 2010 17

Pick this year’s model and the Adam Pynacker 1660 version. One is an officially sanctioned Australian landscape. . The sound of embarrassment and protesting too much Do you know the sound of embarrassment? It’s the soundtrack to this year’s art controversy. It accompanies the current comedy of the Wynne prize, which is awarded annually for […]

Better to have hearted and lost, than never to have hearted

Better to have hearted and lost, than never to have hearted

April 7, 2010

Inserting heart into the chill of a Venn diagram: mathematical, bureaucratic Venn becomes a Zen perception; lap dances slide into overlap chances; two bright notes coalesce into one dark tone. I heart this graphic. It’s by the designer Aaron Krauss from a little corner of his website. +++ Here is a musical co-relative, Everytime We […]

Gigantic baby and tiny dad (Ron Mueck)

Gigantic baby and tiny dad (Ron Mueck)

April 6, 2010 2

. A little day music; Australia’s favourites Did anyone else listen to ABC’s Classic FM over Easter? They ran a program called First Time Classics – listeners wrote in with their stories of the music that turned them on. Yesterday the weekend “extravaganza,” came to a climax, with hosts Christopher Lawrence, a Classic stalwart, and […]

Why the Archibald matters, and why it doesn’t. And why people like it.

Why the Archibald matters, and why it doesn’t. And why people like it.

March 29, 2010 1

. In short: Why the Archibald matters: It matters because the Archibald is about the oldest subject in the history of oil painting and the oldest theme in the history of art: the portrait and the figure. Why it doesn’t: The portrait does not figure very much in today’s “contemporary art practice.” It’s not cool […]

Friday Mulch: Tarantino defended; and a 40-yr-old drumbeat

Friday Mulch: Tarantino defended; and a 40-yr-old drumbeat

September 18, 2009 2

___ The Amen break To talk fascinatingly about 40-year-old drum break you don’t know that you know. Brilliantly oblique! This is the apparent subject of a fantastic youtube recording of what amounts to an art project, but which is also a dissertation or argument for open copyright as an essential ingredient in the health of […]

Nick Cave censored, and cover design

Nick Cave censored, and cover design

September 16, 2009 7

If for no more reason than the new Dan Brown has just been published, today’s post nods back to books. (‘The [Dan Brown] books came straight off the printer, went straight into boxes and were then wrapped in black plastic and sealed,’ Random House spokeswoman Ms Reid said.) +++ To a book with a cosmically […]

90% of contemporary art is crap

90% of contemporary art is crap

September 11, 2009 2

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” Sturgeon’s Law On a roll – we follow on from yesterday’s post about the theft of Damien Hirst’s £500,000 pencils. You may recall: the reputedly richest artist in the world (pictured left, poss. net worth £200 million) is in dispute with an 17-yr-old graffitist, Cartrain, which will end up […]

Damien Hirst’s £500,000 pencils stolen

Damien Hirst’s £500,000 pencils stolen

September 10, 2009 4

Long story short: teenager steals a pack of pencils (above) from multi-millionaire artist, is arrested and up to be fined £500,000. Slightly longer story: 18-year-old graffitist Carwreck, sorry – Cartrain – arrested by the Art and Antiques squad from New Scotland Yard for the theft of a packet of pencils from Tate Britain gallery. Currently […]

Can a landscape painting beat a landscape photo?

Can a landscape painting beat a landscape photo?

August 19, 2009 18

Photography v painting. That hoary old argument*. Naturally enough, photography wins, with hands tied behind its back. The density of detail, that magical documenting of evidence – today was fine, there was no wind, the sun was brilliant, the shadows were dark, she was smiling etc. (We have to trust that no photoshop was applied […]

A bush in the hand: the Heidelberg hegemony

A bush in the hand: the Heidelberg hegemony

August 13, 2009 11

We’re not in Kansas!, said Dorothy to Toto. And we’re not in NSW or SA or Victoria either, Toto. We’re somewhere over the rainbow … What did eventually penetrate my poor head as we wandered around Carnarvon Gorge in central Queensland was that I might have been lost on a parallel planet. It was all […]

Happy 175th, M. Degas

Happy 175th, M. Degas

July 17, 2009 4

Hilaire-Germain-Edgar De Gas, aka Edgar Degas, arrived 19 July 1834, born into money. A god of art, the finest drawer of the human animal of his time and since, Picasso, Egon Schiele et al notwithstanding. He turns 175 this Sunday. Did you manage to catch the Degas show in Canberra? (See the NGA’s slideshow.) Not […]

Time, life, movies

Time, life, movies

July 16, 2009 2

A friend said it was “fun” so we eventually saw State of Play. Rattling along, it did turn out to be a kind of sophisticated, adult fun – just don’t follow the plot too closely or ask why the core interest swings from military industrial complex to single villain simplex. It also makes the case […]

Unnatural talent (I)

Unnatural talent (I)

July 9, 2009

I’ve had art making on my mind. How one makes art. How one arrives at making art. A vague and fluid region – as the nun trilled about Maria in The Sound of Music, ‘How do you pin a wave upon the sand?’. A grand old artist told me recently how, in his youth, he […]

Bringing Bacon home

Bringing Bacon home

July 6, 2009 2

If you’re going to New York this northern summer, you’ll no doubt be checking out the Met’s grand centennial show, or coronation, (as Slate puts it) of Francis Bacon. Like the New Yorker‘s Peter Schjeldahl, I have mixed feelings about the paintings – still, Bacon is unavoidable. He’s got the car crash factor. Not going […]