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Fully Sic — Allie Severin Editor of Fully (sic)

Fully Sic

Allie Severin Editor of Fully (sic)

Fully Sic is Crikey’s language blog for discerning word nerds, where Australian linguists celebrate the wonder of language and challenge popular perception of language issues.

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Swedes and Australians say yes to gender neutrality

Swedes and Australians say yes to gender neutrality

April 2, 2015

As society becomes more focussed on equality, some languages are evolving to include gender-neutral pronouns. Allie Severin and Hedvig Skirgård discuss how this is playing out in Swedish and Australian English.

Who will teach our* languages?

Who will teach our* languages?

August 27, 2014 3 Comments

More and more Australians are embracing the idea that our first languages should be taught in schools. Faced with high levels of language endangerment and loss, everyone's hoping for a quick fix. John Hobson takes a look at what works and what doesn’t. The conclusion: it’s a complex matter. Language teaching requires not only time and hard work but, most of all, well-trained teachers.

Flipping the bird? Or just a sign of the times?

Flipping the bird? Or just a sign of the times?

October 25, 2013 4 Comments

During the NSW bushfire emergency this week, some viewers got a rude shock when they saw the Auslan interpreter apparently 'flipping the bird' to the cameras. Was the interpreter being cheeky or was this a a simple misunderstanding? Sign languages expert Adam Schembri explains.

There’s more to language learning than economic utility

There’s more to language learning than economic utility

October 10, 2013 16 Comments

Recent reports show that the number of students studying Asian languages in later years of high school continue to drop. Lochlan Morrissey wonders if convincing students that learning a second language is economically useful might be the wrong way to go about things.

Did a key witness in Trayvon Martin’s case talk funny, or could we all use some education?

Did a key witness in Trayvon Martin’s case talk funny, or could we all use some education?

July 22, 2013 18 Comments

The George Zimmerman trial in the United States of America has shown a country in deep divide. John Olstad looks at how reactions to the testimony of Rachel Jeantel, friend of Trayvon Martin, demonstrates the cultural attitudes of a nation, and how we all need to learn a little respect.

The bouncer at the national door: the Australian citizenship test

The bouncer at the national door: the Australian citizenship test

June 3, 2013 2 Comments

The Australian citizenship test has been with us since 2007, but is it doing more than just quizzing future Aussies on their knowledge of our form of government, our sporting legends and our public holidays? Linguistics student Ben Purser asks some questions of his own.

Chook lit

Chook lit

May 2, 2013

Here, in this paddock on this weekend, there’d be no designer drugs. No doof-doof music. No baggy skate pants revealing bumcracks. … Instead, Kate knew there’d be booze and boots and ‘bloody-oath, mates’ and good, old-fashioned piss-wrecked fun.

Popularity of “Canberra bashing” lands it in the dictionary

Popularity of “Canberra bashing” lands it in the dictionary

March 1, 2013

Although the city of Canberra is coming of age and celebrating its centenary this year, Canberra bashing remains a popular national pastime. So much so that the Australian National Dictionary Centre is adding it to the Oxford's Australian National Dictionary. Oxford University Press reveals the story behind the latest addition.

Putting language documentation in the hands of the speakers

Putting language documentation in the hands of the speakers

February 19, 2013

Linguist Bruce Birch reports on the recent work of the Minjilang Language Team who are pioneering the use of mobile devices to document Australian languages.

Are we talking Aussie?

Are we talking Aussie?

January 24, 2013 2 Comments

The Australian dialect is a recurring topic here at Fully (sic). Guest blogger Nenagh Kemp from the University of Tasmania tells us about her recent research into one of its most distinctive features, hypocoristics.