Menu lock
LOTEs in the Election: your guide to linguistically-talented candidates (2016 edition)

LOTEs in the Election: your guide to linguistically-talented candidates (2016 edition)

Allie Severin July 1, 2016

It's election time again! But where have all the LOTE-speaking candidates gone? And why are they hiding? Allie Severin takes a look at the linguistic talents of this year's candidates for the Federal Election.

How to solve Australia’s language learning crisis

How to solve Australia’s language learning crisis

Fully (sic) June 15, 2016 2 Comments

With the "moribund" state of language learning in Australia in the spotlight, Ingrid Piller busts some myths, arguing that it does not have to be this way and that something can be done about it.

Testing the critical literacy of voters, educators and…politicians?

Testing the critical literacy of voters, educators and…politicians?

Elisabeth Griffiths May 27, 2016

While the Minister for Immigration and "Border Protection" has been scrutinising refugees' literacy and numeracy, the Australian Government has had its sight set on another group's abilities: Australia's pre-service teachers. Elisabeth Griffiths asks if the Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education Students is worth its salt.

“I am determined to be tenacious in relation to the use of my language”: Bess Price and breaking the English hegemony in NT Parliament

“I am determined to be tenacious in relation to the use of my language”: Bess Price and breaking the English hegemony in NT Parliament

wamut February 18, 2016 11 Comments

Aboriginal Northern Territory MP Bess Price is fighting to be able to use her first language, Warlpiri, in parliament. She argues that it's only fair given it's her first language and the language of half her constituency. The Parliament's Speaker continues to affirm that English is the language of the Assembly. Greg Dickson explores the debate further:

You don’t need English to be an Australian citizen

You don’t need English to be an Australian citizen

Allie Severin June 3, 2015 1 Comment

Should we be changing our national anthem's lyrics to "We've boundless plains to share... but only if you can speak English"? Allie Severin explores the most recent proposal to make English proficiency a pre-requisite to gaining Australian citizenship

Banning prisoners from speaking Arabic is lazy and probably a human rights breach

Banning prisoners from speaking Arabic is lazy and probably a human rights breach

wamut March 8, 2015 1 Comment

Arabic is not a small, minority language. It is the fourth most widely spoken language in Australia. The decision to ban some NSW prisoners speaking it is not only possibly a human rights breach but also just lazy, according to Greg Dickson.

Did C-Pyne drop the c-bomb?

Did C-Pyne drop the c-bomb?

Lochlan Morrissey May 15, 2014 58 Comments

Earlier today a number of news agencies (perhaps all of them, ever) reported on a video, in which Education Minister Christopher Pyne appears to call Manager of Opposition Business Tony Burke the c-bomb after Burke interrupted his speech. Here’s a video of the incident: [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etEsUKzi_GA[/youtube] The minister’s office quickly came out and stated that Pyne […]

Let’s call a cull, a cull

Let’s call a cull, a cull

Lochlan Morrissey January 31, 2014 3 Comments

As the unpopular shark bait and shoot program continues in Western Australia, fisheries minister Troy Buswell has defended the policy, saying that it isn't a cull, but a 'localised shark mitigation strategy'. Lochlan Morrissey suspects Buswell learned the art of political euphemism from the best.

What’s in a name? For the Timorese, quite a lot

What’s in a name? For the Timorese, quite a lot

Piers Kelly December 6, 2013 10 Comments

How to refer to our young neighbour to the north? Is it East Timor, Timor Lorosa'e or Timor-Leste? Gordon Peake and Piers Kelly investigate.

How cuts to the NT Education Department could widen the gap

How cuts to the NT Education Department could widen the gap

wamut October 31, 2013 4 Comments

First, they rejected Gonski because too much funding would go to remote community schools. Now, the NT Education department is cutting positions that are key in supporting Aboriginal students who don't speak English at home. Greg Dickson demonstrates the benefit that such support positions can bring and argues that the NT Government's handling of education could easily cause the much-discussed "gap" to widen rather than narrow.