Facebook Google Menu Linkedin lock Pinterest Search Twitter

Words

Advertisement

Latest

Five use a mysterious preposition

Five use a mysterious preposition

Fully (sic)Mar 30, 20161 Comment

Lurking in the seemingly innocuous pages of a classic children’s story is the perplexing use of an extraneous preposition. What’s it doing there? And what can it tell us about how language changes? Richard Ingold investigates.

From 'Captain's call' to 'refugiado': WOTY 2015

Allie SeverinJan 25, 20164 Comments

It's that time of year again. Linguists and wordsmiths the world over have come together to decree which word(s) should be given the top honour and crowned 'Word of the Year 2015'. Not everybody decides on the same one though, so here at Fully Sic we've collated a list for all your word-loving needs.

YOLO AGOGO

YOLO AGOGO

Fully (sic)Oct 23, 20154 Comments

When buzzwords are harder to follow than a Game of Thrones plotline, it takes a particularly attentive word-watcher to keep track of the trends. Luckily, none other than David Astle is here to examine one that burned brightly but briefly for the impulsive cool kids.

What’s in a name? Language and the (gay) marriage (equality) debate.

What’s in a name? Language and the (gay) marriage (equality) debate.

Elisabeth GriffithsOct 16, 20151 Comment

The meaning of the word ‘marriage’ has been hotly debated in the media and in global politics over the last few years. To explore the role of language in shaping the debate about social changes, here’s Elisabeth Griffiths with an examination of the terms used by those for and against changing the legal definition of ‘marriage’.

Words can wound. Let’s stop calling people ‘crazy’.

Words can wound. Let’s stop calling people ‘crazy’.

Fully (sic)Oct 8, 20151 Comment

This Mental Health Week, Erica Dodd explains why casually using terms that deride mental illness can have more of an effect than you might think.

Negated Intensifiers: Not Super Duper Complicated

Negated Intensifiers: Not Super Duper Complicated

Fully (sic)Jul 8, 2015

They're the grammatical form to use when you want people to know you're not really keen on something. Tias Allard looks into a common English form that sometimes slips under the radar.

Out with the newspaper, in with the gender-neutral title!

Out with the newspaper, in with the gender-neutral title!

Allie SeverinJun 12, 20151 Comment

A newspaper closes its doors but a linguistic window opens! Allie Severin thinks the shutdown of mX could mean good things for Australian English.

Skol! scull! scoll! ... erm ... skål?

Lochlan MorrisseyApr 22, 201514 Comments

Did you hear the news!? Tony Abbott downed a beer! Quickly! A politician! The Prime Minister! Beer! Quickly! Beer! The story of Abbott's recent drink-em-up isn't, in the Grand Scheme

Swedes and Australians say yes to gender neutrality

Swedes and Australians say yes to gender neutrality

Fully (sic)Apr 2, 2015

As society becomes more focussed on equality, some languages are evolving to include gender-neutral pronouns. Allie Severin and Hedvig Skirgård discuss how this is playing out in Swedish and Australian English.

Redefining the refugee

William SteedOct 21, 20134 Comments

Fairfax media reports that Immigration Minister Scott Morrison has sent a list of appropriate terminology for referring to refugee boat arrivals, including referring to the people as 'illegal arrivals' and 'detainees'. How does changing terminology change how we think about something?

https://www.crikey.com.au/2013/10/21/redefining-the-refugee/ == https://www.crikey.com.au/free-trial/==https://www.crikey.com.au/subscribe/

Show popup

Telling you what the others don't. FREE for 21 days.

Free Trial form on Pop Up

Free Trial form on Pop Up
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.