Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death … and more

Young people, feeling hopeless, began to tell each other to follow their ancestors and kill themselves like Purrukapali. But the real story said something else. The true story was about creation, how our first man died to create the Curlew, from the spirit of our first woman, his wife, and how the moon was created from the spirit of Purrukapali's treacherous brother. This was the real story. How can we sort it out?" he asks. "How can we change the ending of the story?"

Bob Gosford — Likes birds and people, not necessarily in that order.

Bob Gosford

Likes birds and people, not necessarily in that order.

The Bush-Stone Curlew Burhinus grallarius is found across Australia apart from the drier parts of western Australia and the Simpson Desert. Once common in the settled and agricultural regions its presence there has been reduced by land-clearing and modern land-management practices.

Like many Australian birds it has been given a bewildering variety of names - Bush Thick-knee, Southern Stone-Curlew, Weelo and Willaroo being among the most familiar.

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10 thoughts on “Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death … and more

  1. Australia Zoo Bush Stone Curlew | awards - zooawards

    […] Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death…and more – The Bush-Stone Curlew Burhinus grallarius is found across Australia apart from the drier parts of western Australia and the Simpson Desert. Once common in the settled and agricultural regions its presence there has been reduced by land-clearing and … […]

  2. Australia Zoo Bush Stone Curlew | top - worldsbestzoos

    […] Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death…and more – The Bush-Stone Curlew Burhinus grallarius is found across Australia apart from the drier parts of western Australia and the Simpson Desert. Once common in the settled and agricultural regions its presence there has been reduced by land-clearing and … […]

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    […] time hanging on the block at Humpty Doo, birding from the patio, examining spiders, listening to curlews wail after dark, strolling around the property and generally adhering to the principle of steady steady. […]

  4. A guest blog from Bob Gosford – the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death…and more | The Northern Myth | lifeisacarnivore

    […] A guest blog from Bob Gosford – the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death…and more | The… bush stone-curlewdeathindigenoussuicide […]

  5. what type of bird is this ? - Page 3

    […] There is a bird in the States that make a similar noise, just forgotten what they are called. Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death…and more | The Northern Myth The […]

  6. Bush Stone Curlew | Tropical Territory

    […] culture they are often associated with death – you can read an interesting story about it here.  I found this webpage with absolutely gorgeous sketches of birds –check it […]

  7. AnnaD

    I see these birds or something similar, with the googly eyes and the long legs, in inner city Brisbane. Mostly in untended gardens. Dutton Park State School, Fairfield Gardens Shopping centre car park, City Botanical Gardens and also at the back of the Royal Brisbane Hospital along with the Bush Turkeys – I surprised that one and it sort of hissed at me. Mostly they are in pairs, they sit until you get too close and then they will move.

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