Menu lock
Domestic Cat Monitoring in Alice Springs

Domestic Cat Monitoring in Alice Springs

Bob GosfordAug 29, 2017

The domestic cats involved in this study roamed to neighbouring properties, road verges, adjacent bushland and some cats were observed to impact the local wildlife through predation. The results of the study show that even the domestic cats that do not leave their property boundary often, still have the capacity to negatively impact native wildlife. This suggests that the management of the domestic cats could do with improvement.

Coming the

Coming the “sweet prawn” in Palermo: Chips Mackinolty on food, fashion and Dolce & Gabbana

Bob GosfordJul 6, 2017

Intanto alla Vucciria Chips Mackinolty, street artist australiano, realizza “Dolce & Gamberi”, il dipinto di un abito d’“alta moda” con stampa di cannoli e gamberoni. L’ennesimo omaggio ad una Palermo che, per un lungo weekend, sarà davvero internazionale.

Probable Night Parrot detected in the Northern Territory

Probable Night Parrot detected in the Northern Territory

Bob GosfordMay 23, 20171 Comment

Mark Carter and Chris Watson: "We were able to compare our recorded call to other examples of Night Parrot whistle calls from WA. While there is not an exact match, the calls from WA Night Parrot and the bird recorded in the NT are very similar."

Why the chicken crossed the road. And how.

Why the chicken crossed the road. And how.

Bob GosfordJan 7, 2017

On Chickens: Chickens have the capacity to reason and make logical inferences. For example, chickens are capable of simple forms of transitive inference, a capability that humans develop at approximately the age of seven

Bird of the Week: Willy Wagtail -

Bird of the Week: Willy Wagtail – “where’s my dinner Mum?”

Bob GosfordJan 2, 2017

The local pair of Willy Wagtails have taken advantage of the great season we are having in the centre this year and so far have raised two clutches, and I'll expect that, as prime examples of avian opportunism in the desert, they may raise another couple yet in this season.

Bird Hide of the Week: The Buffalo Hide, Darwin

Bird Hide of the Week: The Buffalo Hide, Darwin

Bob GosfordDec 22, 2016

Is it not too much to ask that if we are going to the effort of building something from which the public will gain great pleasure that such structures should not also be beautiful as well?

Birds of the Week: Little Crow and Willy Wagtail: best of enemies

Birds of the Week: Little Crow and Willy Wagtail: best of enemies

Bob GosfordDec 17, 20161 Comment

The other week I came back from town on one of those 40C+ days to a mad flurry of wings and panic calls that can only signal interloper ... or predator. This Little Crow Corvus bennetti was trying to cool down in the water but was being harried by the adult Willy wagtails

'Troublemakers for fire' - Raptors spreading fire in Australian savanna woodlands

‘Troublemakers for fire’ – Raptors spreading fire in Australian savanna woodlands

Bob GosfordOct 1, 2016

Fire provides the opportunity for pyrophilic behaviour by some birds. Brown Falcons perch at the fire-front waiting for grasshoppers, frogs, snakes, lizards and small mammals. Whistling Kites and particularly Black Kites, Milvus migrans, spectacularly hawk around the curtain of flame, preying on grasshopper, cockroaches and other small fleeing animals. Local Aboriginal people believe that Brown Falcons and Black Kites set fires by carrying burning sticks to new locations and drop them into dry grass on unburnt grounds.

Bird of the Week: Straw-necked Ibis, Longreach Waterhole, NT

Bird of the Week: Straw-necked Ibis, Longreach Waterhole, NT

Bob GosfordSep 8, 2016

A few of the birds that passed by my lens while I was camped at one end of the Longreach Waterhole just west of the small NT town of Elliott..

What was the first name for grasswrens?

What was the first name for grasswrens?

Bob GosfordAug 15, 2016

In Pitjantjatjara country we know that the local name for Rhipidura leucophrys is tjintir-tjintirpa. Even if you’re unfamiliar with the scientific name, if you’re musically inclined and have an ear for Australian bird songs, you might recognise tjintir-tjintirpa as an onomatopoeic rendition of the ratcheting call of the Willie Wagtail.