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The Northern Myth

Which way? That way! The High Court issues a mud map for native title compensation

Which way? That way! The High Court issues a mud map for native title compensation

Lawyers will be excited and busy this week. Government lawyers will be reading the decision closely and working out how to proceed.  Often where States or Territories have granted tenure for specific projects (such as a mine) there is a contractual agreement between the State or Territory and the project proponent that passes compensation liabilities through to the proponent, so there will also be some company lawyers busy assessing potential liabilities.  Lawyers who represent indigenous groups will be carefully considering where to go next.

The long overdue and well-deserved death of

The long overdue and well-deserved death of "political correctness." An explainer by Michael Vaughan.

I prefer the definition attributed by some to former US president Harry S Truman in 1945: "Political correctness is a doctrine, recently fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and promoted by a sick mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a piece of shit by the clean end." Amen to that.

#MyPills - Nick Bowditch on two little pills that help him make a better version of himself

#MyPills - Nick Bowditch on two little pills that help him make a better version of himself

So fuck your judgement, and fuck the stigma. I'm proud of every part of me, even the bits that I need a bit of help from these pills with. This is me.

After half a century of making posters … Chips Mackinolty is a one trick pony!

After half a century of making posters … Chips Mackinolty is a one trick pony!

Since then? Countless posters and street art paste-ups; illustrations, cartoons, newspapers, newsletters, magazines, catalogues and books; T-shirts, banners, murals, cassette and CD covers; business cards and letterheads—and the occasional fabric design.

Un-Australia Day: curing the nationalistic itch

Un-Australia Day: curing the nationalistic itch

An annual psoriatic itch that becomes inflamed mid-January before being soothed by the balm that is the public holiday.  The debate distracts us from the real issues we should be considering and doing something about: child protection; an overloaded criminal justice system; the well-being of vulnerable people; adequacy of social services; international obligations; and the humanitarian crisis in Yemen.  The list appears endless. 

Photo Essay: When the rubber hits the road.

Photo Essay: When the rubber hits the road.

Every Australian small town has a place - or several - outside of town where the local hoons take stolen cars to lay their marks on the road in rubber. Sometimes - if the drivers have skill, a good motor and a nice new set of someone else's tyres - the marks left are almost abstract artworks. Other times, less so.

When Pot Was King In The NT: Chapter Two - The Wollogorang Station Crop of 1977

When Pot Was King In The NT: Chapter Two - The Wollogorang Station Crop of 1977

By late 1976 Csidei was in real financial and legal trouble, with debtors—including the Bartons—and corporate regulators on his tail. Around this time, while on one of his occasional trips to Sydney, Harald Paech, manager of Csidei's Wollogorang Station, suggested—half-heartedly and after a few too many drinks—that Csidei might investigate the possibility of growing a cannabis crop to raise some cash.

The Great Disconnect: Sustainable Housing and Energy Efficiency in the Top End

The Great Disconnect: Sustainable Housing and Energy Efficiency in the Top End

The recently-developed Darwin suburb of Muirhead is the model of an obesogenic suburb. It is designed around the car. There is little or no provision of public transport. Streets are meandering and there’s nowhere to go. There are no retail, commercial or social facilities or amenity. There’s no milk bar, there’s not even a pub!

When pot was king in the NT: Chapter One - the Batchelor crop of 1976

When pot was king in the NT: Chapter One - the Batchelor crop of 1976

Darwin has always been a haven for desperados, chancers, carpet baggers and those trying to run away from the dark shadows of a previous life. I'll admit to being one of the latter when I turned up in mid-1984. From the long-lens-view of the populated south-east of the country, Darwin was an attractive bolt-hole, not least because it was about as far away as you could get from your southern ghosts. Not that there was any lack of opportunity for new troubles in the Top End.

Sun sets on NT edition of the Rural Weekly.

Sun sets on NT edition of the Rural Weekly.

Over its four years, Rural Weekly NT emphasised news and views from the pastoral, mining, agriculture, land management and conservation sectors. Politically, it covered the 2016 election loss of former Chief Minister Adam Giles and the rise of Labor’s Michael Gunner. But other issues also rose to the fore, matters deeply affecting those in the bush, including health services, especially mental health and youth suicide, as well as the wind-down of the Inpex project, the impacts of climate change and the potential hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) of the Territory’s gas reserves.