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Topic: AMRRIC
Why Camp Dogs matter – introducing the NT’s new Animal Protection Act

Why Camp Dogs matter – introducing the NT’s new Animal Protection Act

"Lupo was a very large bull mastiff looking dog that was white, except when as kids one time decided to dye him blue or purple with gentian violet ... Maybe he was the Boundless Possible dog": Scott McConnell MLA

Camp Dogs of the Week: AMRRIC’s Kalumburu Vet and Education Program needs your doggy donations

Camp Dogs of the Week: AMRRIC’s Kalumburu Vet and Education Program needs your doggy donations

Veterinary programs improve the health of dogs, so that they are less prone to parasites and have better body condition. Desexed animals live longer and healthier lives. Through surgical desexing, we prevent unwanted puppies; fewer dogs means less competition for food.

Dingoes and Dogs in Indigenous culture

Dingoes and Dogs in Indigenous culture

There are many dog dreaming sites located around the Australian continent and each has its own and often interconnected story of creation and movement of the dingo through the country. Stories are told covering areas over thousands of kilometres and across different language groups.

“I will have the Police shoot your Dog” – animal management in the NT

“I will have the Police shoot your Dog” – animal management in the NT

This brings us back to the Notice at the Nyirripi Store and begs the following question. Has anyone bothered to ask the locals if they want the Police to shoot their dogs? No? I thought not.

Interview with Jan Allen, AMRRIC Program manager

Interview with Jan Allen, AMRRIC Program manager

AMRRIC is covering a wider field now in that we are trying to help out with not only facilitating vets into communities but also to help the local Shires with legislation, trying to increase awareness at the Federal government level of the problems with animal management nationally and we are also trying to increase education of the community.

An interview with Stephen Cutter, Northern Territory veterinarian

An interview with Stephen Cutter, Northern Territory veterinarian

Like many other aspects of life in Aboriginal communities the dogs there are far more visible in Aboriginal communities where there are few fences and the dogs can all be seen in public, whereas in the suburbs of Palmerston and Darwin the dogs are all behind fences and locked inside houses and you just don’t see them.

A Plague of Beautiful Dogs

A Plague of Beautiful Dogs

The traditional relationship between Aboriginal people and dingoes as companions and hunting aides has changed and many communities are have real problems with non-dingo dog health and numbers...but there are some that are really taking steps to do something about these problems...