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Topic: Barunga Statement
Essential documents from Aboriginal Australia: 2 – the 1998 Barunga Statement

Essential documents from Aboriginal Australia: 2 – the 1998 Barunga Statement

"Sovereignty became treaty, treaty became reconciliation and reconciliation became nothing. … We will dig a hole and bury it. It will be a protest but I also hope that it can represent a new start for Aboriginal people”: Galarrwuy Yunupingu, 2006

Kicking the Treaty can down the road … again

Kicking the Treaty can down the road … again

If Abbott had been in power last Friday he would have in all likelihood made a better response than the equivocation from our current leaders. Neither Turnbull or Shorten have the wit, interest or political savvy to get a treaty—or the other proposals in the Uluru Statement—past their respective right wings, who as my colleague Bernard Keane stressed in Crikey yesterday will—with their fellow-travellers—be more than willing to employ dishonesty and deceit to push back on any proposal for a treaty.

The Yirrkala Church Panels, the title deeds for Yolngu clan estates

The Yirrkala Church Panels, the title deeds for Yolngu clan estates

This week's 2013 NAIDOC celebrations focus on the role of the 1963 Yirrkala bark petitions. Here we look at the equally significant history and importance of the Yirrkala Church Panels, also created in 1963.

Olga Havnen to government: “Lift your game, big time”

Olga Havnen to government: “Lift your game, big time”

Olga Havnen Almost a year ago I wrote here of the magnitude of Olga Havnen’s job as the replacement for Bob Beadman in the key role of Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Service Delivery: The most challenging part of Havnen’s new job will be to renew the shattered faith and trust in governments as service […]

The best fun you’ll have out bush all year…the NT’s Barunga Festival

The best fun you’ll have out bush all year…the NT’s Barunga Festival

The Barunga Statement painting combined several clan designs from Yolngu country in northeastern Arnhem Land on the left with a large design featuring traditional Central Desert iconography on the right. As such it visually affirmed the unified demands of the Aboriginal people of the Northern Territory and the Land Councils that represented the interests of those who had already attained the first measure of self-management promised by the Land Rights Act (NT) 1976.