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Topic: Charles Sturt University
Bird of the week: Blue-faced Honeyeater at the Bat’s-wing Coral Tree cafe

Bird of the week: Blue-faced Honeyeater at the Bat’s-wing Coral Tree cafe

The facts which kept me longest scientifically orthodox are those of adaptation—the pollen-masses in Asclepias—the misseltoe, with its pollen carried by insects and seed by Birds—the woodpecker, with its feet and tail, beak and tongue, to climb the tree and secure insects. To talk of climate or Lamarckian habit producing such adaptation to other organic beings is futile. This difficulty, I believe I have surmounted. From a letter to Asa Gray by Charles Darwin, 1857

Roadkill of the week – What can you do with a dead bird?

Roadkill of the week – What can you do with a dead bird?

The penalties for the unauthorised possession of wildlife in the NT are high - for an individual the maximum penalties range from $65,000 to $130,000 and are of course much higher for corporate offenders.

Notes from the Australasian Ornithological Conference 2009

Notes from the Australasian Ornithological Conference 2009

I long ago gave up going to conferences where I'm not presenting a paper and my presentation was in the first session of the first day...

“I’m a biologist and I give a damn!” Part One of an interview with Dave Watson

“I’m a biologist and I give a damn!” Part One of an interview with Dave Watson

Sunday morning music? My current favourite is from a band called The Drones and the song is called “Shark Fin Blues” – it has lyrics that Bob Dylan would be proud of and music that is a bit like early Rolling Stones crossed with Neil Young crossed with…well…name any good eighties punk band. “Shark Fin Blues” – it might just change your world-view!

Why birds, culture and language are relevant…and interesting

Why birds, culture and language are relevant…and interesting

The most substantial single source of Aboriginal bird knowledge in the mainstream ornithological literature was John Gould's "Handbook to The Birds of Australia", published in 1865. I've not been able to find a replacement candidate as the primary source - and much of the information contained therein was collected by one of Gould's collectors, John Gilbert, who was taken from us too soon in 1845 while on a cross-country expedition with Ludwig Leichhardt.