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Topic: ethnobiology
Call For Papers: ‘Ethno-ornithology: advances in collaborative research’ session at CHAGS 12

Call For Papers: ‘Ethno-ornithology: advances in collaborative research’ session at CHAGS 12

We welcome theoretical and speculative papers exploring the significance of bodies of emerging literature (e.g. honeyguides, fire-following raptors) as discussed and understood by groups of collaborators. We favor co-authorship with Indigenous researchers and participation of Indigenous collaborators in this session.

Do these raptors spread fire in the Australian savanna?

Do these raptors spread fire in the Australian savanna?

Use of fire as a tool is normally considered to be restricted to humans, and hence to have played an extremely important role not only in human societal change but also in the large-scale modification of landscapes across the world. But what if animals other than humans exhibit pyrophilic behavior?

Getting the names right. Adventures with sand goanna nomenclature  in central Australia

Getting the names right. Adventures with sand goanna nomenclature in central Australia

For Kaytetye speakers, the main difference between their ethnospecies is size and frequency: arlewatyerre is smaller and common while aremaye is big and less common - five of the former and one of the latter were obtained on this day.

Bird of the Week: Yilingkirrkkirr – the White Throated Grasswren

Bird of the Week: Yilingkirrkkirr – the White Throated Grasswren

Applied ethno-biology at its best. This guest post from Peter Cooke examines the benefits that Aboriginal fire management regimes can have on fragile landscapes and vulnerable --literally -- bird and mammal species.

Ethnoornithology at Montpelier – Birds and People: Research From Four continents – CISE 2012

Ethnoornithology at Montpelier – Birds and People: Research From Four continents – CISE 2012

A look at some of the work being undertaken across the globe by researchers and indigenous people with an interest in birds, people, cultures and the land and environments that they share - from the 13th International Society of Ethnobiology Congress at Montpelier, France in May 2012.

Ethnoornithology at the 9th European Ornithologists’ Union conference

Ethnoornithology at the 9th European Ornithologists’ Union conference

An introduction to the first session at a major European scientific conference dedicated to ethnoornithology - the study of the relationships between people and birds.

Amadeo Rea: on namkams, coyote sickness and perceptions of reality in the greater southwest

Amadeo Rea: on namkams, coyote sickness and perceptions of reality in the greater southwest

Part Two of a conversation with Amadeo Rea, taxonomic ornithologist and ethnobiologist who has spent most of his life working with the Piman people of the greater south-western American deserts.

Bird of the Week: A Eurasian Hoopoe pops in for a beer at the Roebuck Plains Roadhouse….

Bird of the Week: A Eurasian Hoopoe pops in for a beer at the Roebuck Plains Roadhouse….

One night King Solomon invited all the birds to sing to his noble guests. All came except the hoopoe. Angry, the king ordered a search, and when the hoopoe was found and rebuked, the bird explained that he was not guilty of disrespect. On the contrary, for the last three months he had hardly tasted any food or water, flying all over the world to discover if any place existed which was not yet subject to Solomon. Finally he found the land of Sheba, ruled by a beautiful and wise woman called Queen Balkys, where they have not heard the name of Solomon.

Why am I in Columbus, Ohio?

Why am I in Columbus, Ohio?

I gave up attending conferences without presenting at them a long time ago and this year I'm giving two presentations tomorrow in a session dedicated to ethnoornithology and titled "Birds in historical, cultural & archaeological context" where we will "examine birds and human culture in a variety of contexts, including birds, humans and fire, birds and archaeology and what happens when birds, birders and sacred and ancient grounds meet."

Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death … and more

Bird of the Week: the Bush Stone Curlew as a harbinger of death … and more

Young people, feeling hopeless, began to tell each other to follow their ancestors and kill themselves like Purrukapali. But the real story said something else. The true story was about creation, how our first man died to create the Curlew, from the spirit of our first woman, his wife, and how the moon was created from the spirit of Purrukapali's treacherous brother. This was the real story. How can we sort it out?" he asks. "How can we change the ending of the story?"