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Topic: Ethnoornithology Research and Study Group
Ethnoornithology at Cherokee, North Carolina, May 2014

Ethnoornithology at Cherokee, North Carolina, May 2014

The recognition and application of traditional knowledge of birds is increasingly appreciated as a valuable tool for contemporary societies to re-engage with the knowledge of past generations and to provide opportunities to inform modern land and species management for the benefit of species, landscapes and societies. Across the world, local language and cultural groups are recognising the value of ethnoornithology and ethnobiological methodologies, including as tools for inter-generational transfer of knowledge and engaging mainstream land managers with indigenous cultures and societies.

Owls Want Loving Too. Ethno-ornithology from Zambian schoolchildren

Owls Want Loving Too. Ethno-ornithology from Zambian schoolchildren

This fascinating piece of ethnoornithological research explores the knowledge and beliefs of and about Owls by secondary and primary school-children in Zambia. I'd love to know if any of the students went on to become biologists or natural history workers later in life.

Ethnoornithology at the 9th European Ornithologists’ Union conference

Ethnoornithology at the 9th European Ornithologists’ Union conference

An introduction to the first session at a major European scientific conference dedicated to ethnoornithology - the study of the relationships between people and birds.

More birds, people and culture from ICE 2010 – Tofino, BC, Canada

More birds, people and culture from ICE 2010 – Tofino, BC, Canada

Further to my previous post here on the 33rd Society of Ethnobiology meeting at the University of Victoria on Vancouver Island, the following week I traveled up to the small resort town of Tofino for the 12th International Congress of Ethnobiology conducted by the International Society of Ethnobiology. There I joined with my colleague from Nature Kenya, Fleur Ng'weno, to co-chair a larger symposium on Ethnoornithology than I had presented the week before in Victoria, BC.