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Topic: Ethnoornithology Research & Study Group
“Birds in culture and context—Ethnoornithology in application and theory”—abstracts from an ethnoornithology symposium, 2007

“Birds in culture and context—Ethnoornithology in application and theory”—abstracts from an ethnoornithology symposium, 2007

Following are the abstracts of papers and posters presented at the recent Ethnoornithology Symposium, entitled “Birds in culture and context – Ethnoornithology in application and theory“, held during the 30th Society of Ethnobiology conference at the University of  California, Berkeley from 28 to 31st March 2007. It was a great day, with a quantity and quality of papers […]

Ornithogenic Fire: Raptors as Propagators of Fire in the Australian Savanna

Ornithogenic Fire: Raptors as Propagators of Fire in the Australian Savanna

There is compelling evidence that at least two raptor species – the Brown Falcon and the Black Kite – act as propagators of fire within the Australian savanna woodlands and perhaps in other similar biomes elsewhere

Birds, Fire and Culture – a new research project

Birds, Fire and Culture – a new research project

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that some species are active promoters of fire in the northern Australian savannah landscapes, using small fire-sticks and embers to spread fire throughout the open grass and woodlands of the semi-tropical north.

Conferenceville in British Columbia

Conferenceville in British Columbia

In recent years Ethnoornithology has emerged as a valuable sub-discipline of ethnobiological research, partly for its potential to be able to make a valuable contribution to bird conservation and also as a means of empowering people of all cultures preserve, re-examine and discover the connections between individuals, groups and cultures and the birds that people hunt, venerate and cherish.