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Topic: kakadu National Park
When Pot Was King In The NT: Chapter Two – The Wollogorang Station Crop of 1977

When Pot Was King In The NT: Chapter Two – The Wollogorang Station Crop of 1977

By late 1976 Csidei was in real financial and legal trouble, with debtors—including the Bartons—and corporate regulators on his tail. Around this time, while on one of his occasional trips to Sydney, Harald Paech, manager of Csidei's Wollogorang Station, suggested—half-heartedly and after a few too many drinks—that Csidei might investigate the possibility of growing a cannabis crop to raise some cash.

Art in translation: Murray Garde and John Mawurndjul

Art in translation: Murray Garde and John Mawurndjul

One of the most troublesome subjects for interpreters who work with Australian languages is finding acceptable ways to refer to the concept of a sacred site. In Kuninjku, these are known as Djang. In central Australia, the term Tjukurrpa is becoming more well known by non-Indigenous people. These terms involve more than just a location, but also ideas about deep history, the period of creation and the association between specific groups of people and totemic aspects which have their historical focus in these places. The term ‘Dreaming’ is so inadequate and misleading and so many Indigenous people are starting to reject this term, although others continue to use it.

Talking Birds and Fire at the Barrapunta Bird Workshop, Arnhem Land, May 2017

Talking Birds and Fire at the Barrapunta Bird Workshop, Arnhem Land, May 2017

Karrkkanj is a term for the Black Kite but can also be applied to two other raptor species, the Peregrine Falcon and the Brown Falcon, Professor Evans explains. The Peregrine Falcon can also be known more specifically as ngalmirlangmirlang and the Brown Falcon as wunwunbu; these are said to be husband and wife. Karrkkanj is also ritually significant as the one who founded the Lorrkkon mortuary cycle.

Jeffrey Lee’s Koongarra – where love for land trumps love for money.

Jeffrey Lee’s Koongarra – where love for land trumps love for money.

“I have said no to uranium mining at Koongarra because I believe that the land and my cultural beliefs are more important than mining and money. Money comes and goes, but the land is always here." Jeffrey Lee, November 2014.

Roadkill of the Week: Feral Cat, Carpentaria Highway, NT

Roadkill of the Week: Feral Cat, Carpentaria Highway, NT

Welcome to the NT - where the feral cats are as big as children. The cats grow to about 20kg ... the same weight as a five-year-old boy.

Redneck paradise: why are (some) Territorians so mean-spirited and ignorant?

Redneck paradise: why are (some) Territorians so mean-spirited and ignorant?

Are intemperate and insulting comments to an NT News article part of a genuine debate or an indicator of the true extent of red-neckery in the far north?

Where beautiful contradictions abound – Kakadu National Park in the wet.

Where beautiful contradictions abound – Kakadu National Park in the wet.

Kakadu in the wet. It was a great trip - no less so because of the trip home to Darwin through one of the wildest rain and thunder storms I've seen in many a year. Here is what i saw through my windscreen for much of that drive. But what impressed most were the contrasts between the ugly glory of the Ranger uranium mine - smack in the middle of Kakadu - and the landscape that surrounds it.