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Topic: Larrakia
Ships of Darwin Harbour – Part 1 – Industrial shipping

Ships of Darwin Harbour – Part 1 – Industrial shipping

There is the promised threat of long-overdue but never-coming rain through the long months of the Gurrulwa Guligi (big wind) and Dalirrgang (build up) seasons, when pretty much every-thing and -one is stagnant with humidity, sweat and dread and when anything, nothing and everything does, can – or doesn’t and can’t – happen.

Blow-flies, “honey” and secret recipes: the great NAIDOC Blachung cook-off of 2019

Blow-flies, “honey” and secret recipes: the great NAIDOC Blachung cook-off of 2019

"The prawn paste is the base of any proper Blachung of course but a lot of people use really different things. Some use chicken giblets, turtle guts, goose giblets. All sorts of stuff. Some of it is very, very hot, some is mild and some has more flavour than heat. I like a lot of heat and a lot of flavour!": Nigel Browne, Larrakia Development Corporation.

Saving Darwin – from itself

Saving Darwin – from itself

Darwin's suburbs are wild, wonderful spaces that people retreat to with great delight. Look at what the suburbs do well. How do you translate these ideas into an urban setting without resorting to 'tropical character' architectural cliches?

Locum nullius: what’s in a name?

Locum nullius: what’s in a name?

This is a guest post by Chips Mackinolty, an artist and journalist based in Palermo and Darwin.  On 9 August 1974, eight years almost to the day after the famous Wave Hill Walk Off, a group of largely Mangarrayi speaking families walked off Elsey Station. Yes, the place of the colonialist pastoral fantasy of We […]

Maypal, mayali’ ga wanja – tales from the Yolngu tidal zone

Maypal, mayali’ ga wanja – tales from the Yolngu tidal zone

Maypal is a complete part of Yolngu diet and it is free from the sea—celebrated in songs, dance and stories, integral to their world. In fact, maypal is an utterly fundamental part of the Yolngu world: Bentley James

‘Reluctant Reconciliation’ and ‘powerless Recognition’: Sue Stanton reflects on history, power and injustice

‘Reluctant Reconciliation’ and ‘powerless Recognition’: Sue Stanton reflects on history, power and injustice

The rejection of more soft words giving us token recognition in the most powerful document of the land instead of granting us our sovereign rights. The demand for constitutional reform so that we can ensure stronger and safer futures for our children is our best response so far and makes for safer and stronger dialogue in the shared space between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and Australians.

Vincent Lingiari Memorial Lecture 2015. “You can keep your gold. We just want our land back.”

Vincent Lingiari Memorial Lecture 2015. “You can keep your gold. We just want our land back.”

Vincent Lingiari knew who he was and that this land held him close to its heart. “You can keep your gold. We just want our land back.”

Am I white enough for you?

Am I white enough for you?

While I’m prob’ly not black enough for the likes of Andrew Bolt and Bess Price, I’m damn certain I’m still not white enough for the rest of you. Half-breeds like me, we’re still pawns in the middle of a big, nasty, lateral violence fueled discourse, led by self-interested types with ulterior motivations. And that’s why I fight.