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Topic: Museum and Art Gallery NT
Open Cut – people of the south-western Gulf of Carpentaria speak out in words and pictures

Open Cut – people of the south-western Gulf of Carpentaria speak out in words and pictures

After 150 years of white development it’s time for environmental justice in the southwest Gulf, for fair treatment and meaningful involvement of Aboriginal people with respect to development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies in their ancestral lands. The goal must be a fair distribution of the environmental benefits and costs.

Jacky Green: I can hear the miners riding their trucks screaming “Yee-haw, I’m rich, Fuck you!”

Jacky Green: I can hear the miners riding their trucks screaming “Yee-haw, I’m rich, Fuck you!”

I want the government and mining companies to know that we are still here. We aren’t going anywhere. We aren’t dead yet. We are still here, feeling the country. Jacky Green, Darwin, August 2017

What future the arts in the Top End?

What future the arts in the Top End?

The Darwin Festival has failed local visual artists. Spending money on a roving class of interstate creatives and acts is capital that gets drained out of the local culture making economy. There is no substantial quota for local engagement, there is no compulsion that local creatives get engaged and employed. The current festival model fails to connect with and engage the local culture makers. Even the influx of DF production crew in August are like carnies - here for the month then off again to fleece another community with their generic arts festival business model.