Menu
Scroll to top
Topic: Myfany Turpin
Bug of the Week: Termites – the rise and fall of the alate kings and queens

Bug of the Week: Termites – the rise and fall of the alate kings and queens

Northern Australian and Central Desert languages have numerous words for insects that are eaten, used as medicine, or that indicate important phenomena in the immediate environment: Aung Si & Myfany Turpin, 2015.

The Many Faces of Ethnoornithology at the 38th Society of Ethnobiology meeting

The Many Faces of Ethnoornithology at the 38th Society of Ethnobiology meeting

Here I present the abstracts from the ethnoornithology session at the 38th annual Society of Ethnobiology meeting at the University of California Santa Barbara campus last week titled "What Do Birds Tell Us? How Ethno-ornithology Opens Doors to Understanding Relationships with Others."

Getting the names right. Adventures with sand goanna nomenclature  in central Australia

Getting the names right. Adventures with sand goanna nomenclature in central Australia

For Kaytetye speakers, the main difference between their ethnospecies is size and frequency: arlewatyerre is smaller and common while aremaye is big and less common - five of the former and one of the latter were obtained on this day.

Why birds, culture and language are relevant…and interesting

Why birds, culture and language are relevant…and interesting

The most substantial single source of Aboriginal bird knowledge in the mainstream ornithological literature was John Gould's "Handbook to The Birds of Australia", published in 1865. I've not been able to find a replacement candidate as the primary source - and much of the information contained therein was collected by one of Gould's collectors, John Gilbert, who was taken from us too soon in 1845 while on a cross-country expedition with Ludwig Leichhardt.

Birds that tell people things – 4 posters of central Australian bird knowledge

Birds that tell people things – 4 posters of central Australian bird knowledge

This series of posters features birds that indicate ecological and social events in four Central Australian Aboriginal languages: Arrernte, Anmatyerr, Alyawarr and Kaytetye.