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Topic: Northern Centre for Contemporary Art
Love – portraits by Therese Ritchie. A Darwin Pride Festival 2017 presentation.

Love – portraits by Therese Ritchie. A Darwin Pride Festival 2017 presentation.

How the portraits came about is simple, but its alchemy is difficult to explain. Overall it involves listening to each subject as they talk about aspects of their sexuality. Usually by the end of the conversation, we will have collated a list of relevant words and phrases. It is not a chronological list but definitely an elegant description of a life. There is always one word or phrase that resonates very deeply with the subject and that is what they take to the next level through merging the words with the physical form—in this case their bodies.

Open Cut – people of the south-western Gulf of Carpentaria speak out in words and pictures

Open Cut – people of the south-western Gulf of Carpentaria speak out in words and pictures

After 150 years of white development it’s time for environmental justice in the southwest Gulf, for fair treatment and meaningful involvement of Aboriginal people with respect to development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies in their ancestral lands. The goal must be a fair distribution of the environmental benefits and costs.

Jacky Green: I can hear the miners riding their trucks screaming “Yee-haw, I’m rich, Fuck you!”

Jacky Green: I can hear the miners riding their trucks screaming “Yee-haw, I’m rich, Fuck you!”

I want the government and mining companies to know that we are still here. We aren’t going anywhere. We aren’t dead yet. We are still here, feeling the country. Jacky Green, Darwin, August 2017

We Never Ceded Our Countries. Garawa, Gudanji, Marra and Yanyuwa people speak truth to power

We Never Ceded Our Countries. Garawa, Gudanji, Marra and Yanyuwa people speak truth to power

The contamination of land, water, air and wildlife can be seen across the region. The Redbank Copper Mine was abandoned in the mid-1990s, with an estimated 54,000 tonnes of partially treated acid-forming material left exposed to the monsoonal rains for 17 years. Poor management has resulted in highly toxic waste bleeding into nearby waterways.