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Topic archives: Society of Ethnobiology

“Birds in culture and context—Ethnoornithology in application and theory”—abstracts from an ethnoornithology symposium, 2007

“Birds in culture and context—Ethnoornithology in application and theory”—abstracts from an ethnoornithology symposium, 2007

November 21, 2017

Following are the abstracts of papers and posters presented at the recent Ethnoornithology Symposium, entitled “Birds in culture and context – Ethnoornithology in application and theory“, held during the 30th Society of Ethnobiology conference at the University of  California, Berkeley from 28 to 31st March 2007. It was a great day, with a quantity and quality of papers […]

Return of the Storm-bird – the Channel-billed Cuckoo comes south for the summer

Return of the Storm-bird – the Channel-billed Cuckoo comes south for the summer

November 19, 2017

I've been very interested in cuckoos generally—and Channel-billed Cuckoos in particular—for a few years, especially in relation to the knowledge that Aboriginal language groups here in the Northern Territory and beyond have about them. I'd love to hear any information that groups outside of the areas discussed in the post may have—feel free to drop me a line or post a comment.

Roadside memorials of southern California II: the deadly curves of Route 33

Roadside memorials of southern California II: the deadly curves of Route 33

May 24, 2015

Few people drive Highway 33; even fewer make the run from end to end. Highway 1, dancing along the coast, offers better scenery, and Interstate 5, a more-or-less parallel route, greater speed and efficiency. No, this is a workaday road, a highway for short-haul truckers and agricultural sales reps, for convoys of harvesters, vans shuttling prisoners and even the occasional lone tractor.

Roadside memorials of southern California:  Father J. J. Crowley, the ‘desert padre’

Roadside memorials of southern California: Father J. J. Crowley, the ‘desert padre’

May 23, 2015

While returning from a publicity trip to San Francisco in Sept. 1940, Fr. Crowley struck a steer that had wandered onto the highway. His car was forced into the path of an oncoming truck, and he was killed instantly.

Snake of the Week: Great Basin Gopher Snake

Snake of the Week: Great Basin Gopher Snake

May 23, 2015

Alerted to danger, the snake coils up, vibrates its tail and hisses a warning. The Gopher snake can also spread and flatten its head, thereby resembling a rattler even more. An unsure predator mistakes this behavior and the somewhat triangular head of the Gopher snake for a rattlesnake and backs off from its pursuit."

The Many Faces of Ethnoornithology at the 38th Society of Ethnobiology meeting

The Many Faces of Ethnoornithology at the 38th Society of Ethnobiology meeting

May 12, 2015

Here I present the abstracts from the ethnoornithology session at the 38th annual Society of Ethnobiology meeting at the University of California Santa Barbara campus last week titled "What Do Birds Tell Us? How Ethno-ornithology Opens Doors to Understanding Relationships with Others."

Ethnoornithology at Montpelier – Birds and People: Research From Four continents – CISE 2012

Ethnoornithology at Montpelier – Birds and People: Research From Four continents – CISE 2012

May 13, 2014

A look at some of the work being undertaken across the globe by researchers and indigenous people with an interest in birds, people, cultures and the land and environments that they share - from the 13th International Society of Ethnobiology Congress at Montpelier, France in May 2012.

Ethnoornithology at Cherokee, North Carolina, May 2014

Ethnoornithology at Cherokee, North Carolina, May 2014

May 12, 2014

The recognition and application of traditional knowledge of birds is increasingly appreciated as a valuable tool for contemporary societies to re-engage with the knowledge of past generations and to provide opportunities to inform modern land and species management for the benefit of species, landscapes and societies. Across the world, local language and cultural groups are recognising the value of ethnoornithology and ethnobiological methodologies, including as tools for inter-generational transfer of knowledge and engaging mainstream land managers with indigenous cultures and societies.

Burning down the house. When rats & snakes take their revenge.

Burning down the house. When rats & snakes take their revenge.

June 22, 2013 2

Only in Texas. "We were trying to kill a snake with fire," the woman said during a 911 call. "It done caught the house."

Birds, Fire and Culture – a new research project

Birds, Fire and Culture – a new research project

April 13, 2013

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that some species are active promoters of fire in the northern Australian savannah landscapes, using small fire-sticks and embers to spread fire throughout the open grass and woodlands of the semi-tropical north.