Menu
Scroll to top
Topic: Supreme Court of the Northern Territory
Why are the secrets of the Pitjantjara people for sale in Adelaide?

Why are the secrets of the Pitjantjara people for sale in Adelaide?

Foster and Others v Mountford and Rigby Ltd 14 ALR 71 (1976) was an unusual case in a number of respects. Firstly, the plaintiffs were members of an unincorporated association (the Pitjantjara Council) that represented the Pitjantjara people, who live on large tracts of land that spans the south-western corner of the Northern Territory, the north-west of South Australia and the far central east of Western Australia ...

Art in translation: Murray Garde and John Mawurndjul

Art in translation: Murray Garde and John Mawurndjul

One of the most troublesome subjects for interpreters who work with Australian languages is finding acceptable ways to refer to the concept of a sacred site. In Kuninjku, these are known as Djang. In central Australia, the term Tjukurrpa is becoming more well known by non-Indigenous people. These terms involve more than just a location, but also ideas about deep history, the period of creation and the association between specific groups of people and totemic aspects which have their historical focus in these places. The term ‘Dreaming’ is so inadequate and misleading and so many Indigenous people are starting to reject this term, although others continue to use it.

Unholy alliances:  The conservative forces at play against land rights: 1967-1976

Unholy alliances: The conservative forces at play against land rights: 1967-1976

Northern Territory Attorney General John Elferink: Land rights, he said, had become a “wall of imprisonment” blocking Aborigines from participating in northern development.

The oppression of Aboriginal law

The oppression of Aboriginal law

The authors of the Little Children Are Sacred report found that overall levels of dysfunction were higher in Indigenous communities where traditional law had significantly broken down. They argued that is more likely that Indigenous people will respond positively to their own law and culture than to laws imposed upon them.

Djambuy’s case and the recognition of Aboriginal customary law

Djambuy’s case and the recognition of Aboriginal customary law

"This is the first time in a long time that Balanda (European) and Yolngu laws have worked together like this. Yolngu are not asking for a separate system. This is about creating a dialogue between the two systems."

A tale of two Territory women. Rebecca Healy, Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, the ABC and a defamation action

A tale of two Territory women. Rebecca Healy, Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, the ABC and a defamation action

On the afternoon of the 26th of January 2012 Rebecca Healy and Rosalie Kunoth-Monks were both on the lawns near to the Aboriginal Tent Embassy across from Old Parliament House in Canberra and far from Tennant Creek. What happened next would see them on opposite sides in the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory.

Rosalie Kunoth-Monks on her ABC defamation win: “I feel an enormous sense of vindication and relief.”

Rosalie Kunoth-Monks on her ABC defamation win: “I feel an enormous sense of vindication and relief.”

Mrs Kunoth-Monks: "I feel an enormous sense of vindication and relief. I have always been about bringing people together and not pulling them apart. Having a national story that stated otherwise hurt me deeply."

The Yirrkala Bark Petitions. How an old typewriter helped change the course of Australian history

The Yirrkala Bark Petitions. How an old typewriter helped change the course of Australian history

In this NAIDOC Week when the focus is on the impact of the 1963 Yirrkala Bark Petitions to the Australian Parliament, it is timely to reflect how an old typewriter helped change the course of Australian history.