aviation

Dec 20, 2013

Etihad works its new Greek connections in SYD, MEL and PER

Australia's Greek air connections have been in a state of neglect for many years, and are something Etihad clearly intends to address with its newly announced codeshare with Greece'

Ben Sandilands — Editor of Plane Talking

Ben Sandilands

Editor of Plane Talking

Aegean Airlines A321, Wikipedia Commons photo

Australia’s Greek air connections have been in a state of neglect for many years, and are something Etihad clearly intends to address with its newly announced codeshare with Greece’s largest airline, Aegean, from 30 March.

The key element isn’t the  four times weekly Aegean A320 service between Abu Dhabi and Athens on which Etihad will codeshare, as it already flies that route daily.

What matters is that Etihad gains integrated booking and selling right across the Greek market  by placing its booking code on beyond Athens connections flown by Aegean to 16 destinations in Greece and its islands, as well as ten cities elsewhere in Europe.

In its statement Etihad emphasises the benefits this will offer Australians flying to the cities on Aegean network via Abu Dhabi. It would also increase Virgin Australia’s selling opportunities to travellers flying to Greece or elsewhere in Europe.

2 comments

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2 thoughts on “Etihad works its new Greek connections in SYD, MEL and PER

  1. FlyLo

    Etihad can certainly pick them! Most (if not all) of its airline investments (Aer Lingus, Air Berlin, Air Serbia, Darwin Airlines, Jet Airways and – possibly also – Virgin Australia) are not making any money!

    And yesterday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Etihad could invest as much as €300 million in Alitalia and take a 49 per cent stake in the airline with a decision possibly as early as 25th December 2013!

    I had to check that it wasn’t 1st April when I read this.

    Unusually for Etihad, it appears not to be acquiring any equity in Aegean at this stage.

    Aegean has not been profitable since its privatisation in 2009.

    But it is now claiming to be ‘profitable’ for the first nine months of 2013. This conveniently excludes Olympic Airlines’ losses (now a wholly-owned subsidiary of Aegean) which will undoubtedly result in an overall loss for the group for the year.

    Olympic airlines is in such bad shape that the European Commission recently concluded that it ‘is highly unlikely to become profitable in the foreseeable future under any business plan.’

    Why Aegean agreed to pay €72 million for Olympic, a perpetually loss making airline, is a complete mystery to me.

    But then I must admit it is also a mystery why Etihad invests in so many airlines that are in such poor financial health.

    I understand that Etihad may do this to generate traffic flow onto their network but the airlines it has invested in regularly record real and sizeable losses and many (like Jet Airways) have significant debts. Etihad must have recourse to a deep pool of money to keep them all afloat!

  2. moa999

    FlyLo,

    I thing they are sitting on a pretty deep pool – of liquid oil

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