Emirates A380s show that four engines for the long haul make sense for hot airfields and high loads
Emirates A380s show that four engines for the long haul make sense for hot airfields and high loads

Emirates’ Qatar Airways moment‘ with the Airbus A380 and its switch over to Rolls-Royce engines for the big airliner has passed with everyone seemingly happy.

A Qatar Airways moment is defined as a last minute threatened or actual cancellation or deferral of an order for an Airbus or Boeing airliner, something that the Doha based carrier has become well known for doing to jetmakers and their engine or seat suppliers on both sides of the Atlantic.

Emirates had refused to take delivery of its first Rolls-Royce powered A380, originally scheduled for December 2, unless it met its performance guarantees to its satisfaction.  This will now go ahead, but on December 16.

According to Bloomberg, which broke the story weeks ago, Rolls-Royce has agreed to pay for fixing everything that Emirates objected to. As one would when a customer prepared to buy 217 of your Trent 900 engines describes them as unacceptable in relation to a number of critical issues (all now fixed).

What might be of more interest to Australian travellers, who can’t get enough of the A380 services flown by Emirates, Etihad, Singapore Airlines and of course Qantas, is that the Dubai based carrier says Airbus is committed to delivering the jet through to 2026 and that it will play a major role in its operations for a very long time.

The story also touches on the challenges of getting airliners to perform as required in the fiercely hot and gritty conditions experienced at UAE airports.

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