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Federal Election 2016

Jan 26, 2014

Seat of the week: Port Adelaide

Keeping things focused on South Australia as the state election looms into view, the latest instalment of Seat of the Week takes us to the state's safest Labor seat.

Numbers indicate size of two-party preferred booth majority for Labor. Click for larger image. Map boundaries courtesy of Ben Raue at The Tally Room.

The electorate of Port Adelaide includes Port Adelaide itself and the adjacent Le Fevre Peninsula, including the suburbs around Sempahore and Largs Bay, along with Woodville and its surrounds to the north of the city and, some distance to the north-east, a stretch of suburbs from Parfield Gardens north to Salisbury North, which are separated from the rest of the electorate by the Dry Creek industrial area. A very safe seat for Labor, its margin after the 2013 election was 14.0%, pared back from a redistribution-adjusted 20.9% by a 6.9% swing to the Liberals.

Port Adelaide was created with the expansion of parliament in 1949 from an area that had previously made Hindmarsh a safe seat for Labor. Such was Labor’s strength that the Liberals did not field candidates in 1954 and 1955, when the only competition for Labor came from the Communist Party. Rod Sawford assumed the seat at a by-election in 1988 upon the resignation of the rather more high-profile Mick Young, who had been the member since 1974. With Sawford’s retirement at the 2007 election the seat passed on to Mark Butler, the state secretary of the Left faction Liquor Hospitality and Miscellaneous Workers Union and a descendant of two conservative state premiers: his great- and great-great-grandfathers, both of whom were called Sir Richard Butler.

Butler quietly established himself as a rising star over Labor’s two terms in government, winning promotion to parliamentary secretary in June 2009 and then to the junior ministry portfolios of mental health and ageing after the 2010 election. The latter promotion came despite his noted hesitancy in jumping aboard the Julia Gillard bandwagon during the June 2010 leadership coup. Butler was elevated to cabinet in December 2011 when social inclusion was added to his existing responsibilities, and he further gained housing and homeless in the February 2013 reshuffle which followed the departure of Nicola Roxon and Chris Evans. He remained solidly behind Gillard when Kevin Rudd challenged her for the leadership in February 2012, but emerged among the decisive defectors to the Rudd camp ahead of his successful leadership bid in June 2013. The subsequent reshuffle saw him promoted to environment and climate change, which he retained in the shadow ministry following the election defeat.

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581 comments

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zoidlord
Guest

The talk of number of hours that a person on DSP can do is useless, it’s the participation rate that is important.

zoidlord
Guest

@guytaur/422

yup sums up Coalition Party Work For Dole, requires a job in the first place.

BlindFreddy
Guest

#469 Page 10 was to Kezza, not “Mezzanine”.

Bloody iPhone auto correct ….

guytaur
Guest

“@GhostWhoVotes: #ReachTEL Poll Primary Votes: L/NP 39.8 (-1.6) ALP 40.6 (+0.2) GRN 9.1 (+0.4) #auspol”

“@GhostWhoVotes: #ReachTEL Poll Personal financial position after last 12 months: Better off 20.3 Worse off 39.3 #auspol”

“@GhostWhoVotes: #ReachTEL Poll Aust economy heading in right or wrong direction: Right 34.9 Wrong 39.3 #auspol”

guytaur
Guest

Rua

Sorry to hear your news. Like others its good to hear of the help from consular staff and airlines.

My condolences

kezza2
Guest

ruawake

6.15pm: Just rejoined the conversation, and saw your post.

Jeez, mate, so sorry to hear you have lost your father in such sudden circumstances, but good to hear the airline/Aus staff have been so supportive of your mother.

Thinking of you and yours. Take care.

-Kerry Byrne & family.

zoomster
Guest

Tom

[Arguing that the higher unemployment figures are the result of increased female workforce participation not other economic policies decreases political pressure on economic policies and feeds the arguments of the “women would be better at home”]

Well, only if you can’t walk and chew gum at the same time.

Recognising that something caused something is not the same as arguing that that something should be undone.

confessions
Guest

poroti:

It relates to his blog post today in which he argues against the current mechanism for changing the constitution.
http://blogs.theaustralian.news.com.au/mumble/index.php/theaustralian/comments/abbott_and_bolt_both_wrong/

Personally I think he makes a valid point. Some things are simply beyond the capability of voters voting in referendums.

mikehilliard
Guest
Apologies if already posted. [a message that International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde was hammering home in Davos. “Business and political leaders at the World Economic Forum should remember that in far too many countries the benefits of growth are being enjoyed by far too few people. This is not a recipe for stability and sustainability,” she said. It is telling to contrast this with comments by Prime Minister Tony Abbott at the same event. He avoided endorsing calls for a focus on inequality above and beyond economic growth, saying: ”As always, stronger economic growth is the key to… Read more »
victoria
Guest

Kevin B

I saw this via Channel 7 twitter account

[Exclusive Seven News/@ReachTEL poll tonight on @7NewsSydney and #7news around Oz. Some surprising results on economy and politics.]

zoomster
Guest

[ReachTEL Poll 2 Party Preferred: L/NP 47 (-1) ALP 53 (+1) ]

Fran Barlow
Guest

Fess

Personally, I prefer the current s128 provision, though it’s still not good. I’d prefer a simple Australia votes as a single electoral division model. I’d also like it to be possible for voters to rank similar proposals much as preferential voting allows people to rank candidates.

There should also be scope for voters to indicate why they made the choices they did in a simple multiple choice format. That would give those with a stake in the matter guidance on the outcome if it failed or passed with some reservations.

victoria
Guest

A retired senior Royal Australian Navy (RAN) officer has hit out at the Federal Government’s stop the boats policy as “morally corrupt and totally indefensible”.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-01-27/coalition-boats-policy-morally-indefensible-says-john-ingram/5220886

poroti
Guest

confessions

Although it causes problems you cannot blame the smaller states from inserting such a clause so as to try and stop them being steamrolled by the two big states.

confessions
Guest

[Peter Brent ‏@mumbletwits 50m
For anyone interested, here the 1891 draft referendum amendment clause. Typed words before some dolt changed it.comment image … ]

Diogenes
Guest

Mb

The problem of defining a disease is hard enough.

Kevin Bonham
Guest

Polling imminent – ReachTEL Seven News.

We don’t have Seven as such in Tas so I’ll possibly miss it!

mexicanbeemer
Guest

Dio

True, most medical conditions don’t but then this comes to the definition of a disability and also many modern medical treatments.

Diogenes
Guest

Mb

Most medical diagnoses don’t lead to a disability.

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