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Federal Politics 2013-

Jul 31, 2014

BludgerTrack: 52.1-47.9 to Labor

Post-MH17 polls have boosted Tony Abbott's personal ratings and slightly improved the Coalition's position on voting intention, although Labor remains comfortably ahead.

This week’s better-late-than-never BludgerTrack poll aggregate reading finds the MH17 effect boosting the Coalition by 1.1% on two-party preferred, and putting it two points clear of Labor on the primary vote. On the seat projection, the Coalition this week gains two in Queensland and one in every other mainland state, a net gain of six that nonetheless leaves Labor with an overall majority of 79 seats out of 150. The bigger effect is on the personal ratings, for which Newspoll contributes to a lift of nearly six points on the reading for Tony Abbott’s net approval, albeit from a dismally low base. Newspoll also causes the previously downward trend for Bill Shorten’s net approval rating to level off this week, although his lead as preferred prime minister continues to narrow.

Also on the better-late-than-never front, this week’s Essential Research, which I neglected to cover on Tuesday, had the Coalition gaining a point for the second week in a row to now trail 51-49, from primary votes of 41% for the Coalition (up two on a week ago), 38% for Labor (down one), 9% for the Greens (steady) and 5% for Palmer United (down one). Other questions found a very healthy 67% approving of Tony Abbott’s handling of the Malaysia Airlines disaster with only 13% disapproving; Malaysia Airlines, the Malaysian government and the United Nations also credited with handling the matter well, but the Russian government not so much; 49% believing Vladimir Putin should not be allowed to attend the G20 versus 29% for should be allowed; and 62% supporting trade sanctions against Russia, 46% supporting the withdrawal of diplomatic relations and 28% supporting support for the Ukrainian government against the rebels, with only 8% preferring that no action be taken.

The poll also finds 59% of respondents not expecting their electricity bill to decrease as a result of the carbon tax repeal, which includes 16% who actually expect it to go up, versus only 33% who expect it to fall. A question on actions on climate change policy has only 5% nominating the government’s direct action policy of the available options and only 19% going for an emissions trading scheme, with 43% insteading opting for “incentives for renewable energy”. Another question finds 51% favouring an increase in the childcare rebate over the government’s paid parental leave scheme, which is preferred by only 25%.

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Otiose
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Nett_NEWS++™ by @Otiose94 http://bit.ly/1nAtjp1 #PPL, #abbott, Not Changing by @rowe_david © http://bit.ly/1uXmLXj

Strong UnionsStrongCountry
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Strong UnionsStrongCountry

PARENTS of kids battling cancer are furious the state’s new children’s hospital won’t have a special room for them to stay overnight, nor will it prepare meals just for them.

They say the room, which is currently available at Princess Margaret Hospital, offers much-needed respite.

And people keep voting Liberal

Patrick Bateman
Guest

Kevin Andrews’ attack on de facto couples is utterly disgusting.

Is he breaching discrimination legislation?

Why does his party preach freedom for corporations, yet feel entitled to micromanage how private individuals choose to live their lives?

Strong UnionsStrongCountry
Guest
Strong UnionsStrongCountry
The cuts Abbott/Hockey/Corman didn’t mention; From Penny Wong; Senator Cormann’s response shows 112 programs across ten portfolios will be hit by an indexation freeze for up to four years (attached). The hidden cuts include: •$30.3 million from health programs including the National Immunisation Strategy, the National Depression Initiative, and mental health services like counselling, support for children and better access to psychiatrists and GPs; •$15.9 million from education and training, including cuts to programs to improve the quality of teaching in schools, civics and citizenship education and the Industry Workforce Training program; •$28.9 million in cuts to aged care programs… Read more »
Rossmcg
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Legislation for Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s prized $5.5 billion paid parental leave scheme has been quietly shelved and is unlikely to be put to Parliament this year, sources have revealed. The move is aimed at quelling backbench dissent on the issue and is also a recognition it may be voted down by rebel government senators if put to the test. Treasurer Joe Hockey said in June that PPL legislation would be introduced ‘‘soon’’ and described as ‘‘absurd’’ suggestions the policy had been stalled due to internal unrest. Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen But a government source said the… Read more »
kezza2
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[Oakeshott Country Posted Sunday, August 3, 2014 at 12:10 am | PERMALINK Wilfred Owen who met Sassoon in the hospital for the neurasthenic and became anti-war returned to the trenches and was killed in the last week of the war.] Silly old Anti-War Willy, eh. What a duffer! What a waste. Yeah, OC, you may have treated the poor old buggers in hospital, but you didn’t get to see how they treated their families. My FIL tried to drink himself to death. To forget the horror of war in PNG during WWII. But his body kept going. He bashed his… Read more »
Oakeshott Country
Guest

Wilfred Owen who met Sassoon in the hospital for the neurasthenic and became anti-war returned to the trenches and was killed in the last week of the war.

kezza2
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[Rossmore Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 11:49 pm | PERMALINK Kezza. Brookes lines on the sadness and futility of war will endure long after you and I are gone.] Brookes egotistical lines will also endure long after the deaths of 100 AIDS specialists lost on MH17 (oops, make that 6) and the deaths of the doctors fighting ebola; and those fighting hunger, and poverty, and inequality, as long as there are men who think his words “sad” and that they talk about the “futility of war”. Let’s just pack up and leave. Let’s not say our bit. We can’t… Read more »
Oakeshott Country
Guest
I worked in a Repat hospital between 1976 and 1995. In the 70s many of the Vietnam vets treated there certainly were suffering and had a sense of betrayal but I was never sure if these were a fair example of the cohort or a fairly vocal subset. In contrast some of the WW1 and more of the WW2 veterans in hospital were angry and obviously damaged but most were well adjusted men enjoying old age The theory in the hospital was that the further from the war the greater and more representative the sample that used Repat services and… Read more »
dave
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[ briefly
Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 11:45 pm | Permalink

If one thing seems to lie before us, it is the prospect of re-living the war for the next four years. ]

Yep. A bleak prospect.

Yet – Some of it all is valid reminder of what can happen and Putin is a worry as is reaction to him.

dave
Guest

[ Oakeshott Country
Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 11:45 pm | Permalink

Btw Sassoon survived ]

Good. I thought he had been killed in the war.

Rossmore
Guest

Kezza. Brookes lines on the sadness and futility of war will endure long after you and I are gone.

briefly
Guest

If one thing seems to lie before us, it is the prospect of re-living the war for the next four years.

Oakeshott Country
Guest

Btw Sassoon survived

dave
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[ Oh, so that’s why the Viet Vets are so unhappy. I’ll have to tell the ones I know they were actually feted, enthusiastically, from large crowds. ]

See # 1132. There were parades etc.

The blokes who came home later were shunned by the very voters who sent them and they have every right to resent their treatment.

Voters showed themselves as arseholes and yet again rewarded the tories.

But things were different in earlier years. Later years poisoned it all.

Oakeshott Country
Guest

Sassoon’s friend Robert Graves’ work, particularly ‘Goodbye to all that’ strikes me as avery strong message about war.

kezza2
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Rossmore [Dead bodies dont discriminate.] And soil doesn’t discriminate which nationality enriches it. Just stupid vainglorious youth does, according to the vagaries of supposedly adult men. BTW, why do you think most women are against war?? Think about it, from our point of view. We spend 9 months growing a human being in our bodies. We give birth, mostly paingully. We then spend another 20 years nurturing that person. We don’t want a stupid dumb f**k of a bloke, who doesn’t belong to our family, telling us that 19-20 years of hard work is just to go and kill some… Read more »
Rossmore
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Kezza. Any dead body will enrich soil. Dead bodies dont discriminate.

Steve777
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Re Kezza2 @1141: Menzies and Holt deserve derision, not the common soldiers and certainly not the conscripts.

dave
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[ Oakeshott Country Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 11:20 pm | Permalink I admire Brooks for his persistence.Not only was he going to expand the Empire while still alive but he was also going to do his bit when dead by claiming a 6 foot hole for the mother country. ] Sassoon is more worthy of admiration imo. He did the trenches, came home wounded and decorated, told them to get stuffed and that he wasn’t going back and that it was all a crock, he had the army not knowing how to treat a genuine hero who was… Read more »
kezza2
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[Rossmore
Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 11:25 pm | PERMALINK
Kezza you’ve put an interpretation on that line about rich soil that is utterly wrong.]

Okay, what’s your interpretation?

Rossmore
Guest

But I cant be fecked to argue the toss with complete feckwits. Night all.

kezza2
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steve777 [Whatever the controversies of Australia’s involvement in that war, the Vietnam War veterans were required to perform a dangerous and unpleasant task for their country and deserved respect, not derision. Menzies, Holt, et al on the other hand…] All warmongers deserve derision. Menzies didn’t campaign for conscription. He introduced it after the 1963 election. Sure, the Liberal Party won the 1966 election, but it wasn’t too long after that with the body bags arriving home, and conscientious objection, and of course losing the war, saw the tide of public opinion change. Peoples’ kids were getting killed for no reason.… Read more »
Rossmore
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Kezza you’ve put an interpretation on that line about rich soil that is utterly wrong.

Oakeshott Country
Guest

How can you say it was a waste?
Didn’t the war stop Austro-Hungarian ambitions in the Balkans and give Sud-Tyrol and Trieste to Italy?
More importantly for Australia didn’t it ensure that we would remain a country for the White man (at least that was Billy Hughes’ claim)

Steve777
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Re Pedant @1131: yes, maybe too harsh – a young man contemplating death who never had a chance for mature reflection.

A cold night in Sydney – 9 degrees at the Observatory Hill hothouse (Sydney’s ‘official’ temperature) and 5 degrees at the more representative Olympic Park.

Oakeshott Country
Guest

I admire Brooks for his persistence.Not only was he going to expand the Empire while still alive but he was also going to do his bit when dead by claiming a 6 foot hole for the mother country.

dave
Guest

[ Yeah, he didn’t even fight. He wasn’t a warrior. He was just good to look at. I mean, no wonder he penned the fatuous words of his rotting body’s dust enriching another country’s soil.]

His poetry reflected the public’s early attitude to the war – as it does in most wars – but public reaction was WAY over the top on both sides in WW1.

Then reality hit – particularly in the so called Pal’s Battalions – when local lads joined up together and were slaughtered together and their neighborhoods were devastated together and never really got over it.

A generation wasted.

Oakeshott Country
Guest

Despite the myth that the war was unpopular the war party one both relevant elections. The 1966 election was Labor’s worst defeat since 1932 – a feat that has only recently been beaten.

All regiments received enthusiastic welcomes from large crowds. The only major disturbance was the Sydney parade in 1966 when a single female protestor doused herself in red paint and embraced the Colonel leading the parade.

kezza2
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dave [I have just finished Niall Ferguson’s, “The War of the World” and he refers to Brooke as being regarded as the “most handsome man in Britain” at the time. But he died at sea, without seeing active service, from blood poisoning as the result of an infected mosquito bite on his way to Gallipoli.] Yeah, he didn’t even fight. He wasn’t a warrior. He was just good to look at. I mean, no wonder he penned the fatuous words of his rotting body’s dust enriching another country’s soil. Oh, please. And this is what future generations hang on, to… Read more »
Steve777
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Vietnam Veterans’ welcome home parade 1987 (not 86): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YL06ddRmiJE

Whatever the controversies of Australia’s involvement in that war, the Vietnam War veterans were required to perform a dangerous and unpleasant task for their country and deserved respect, not derision. Menzies, Holt, et al on the other hand…

dave
Guest
[ I don’t recall the welcome home ticker tape parades for the Viet Vets. All I remember is the scorn from the public, and the anger and bitterness of the conscriptees, not to mention the psychiatric problems. ] There were parades for ALL of the battalions when they came home, but if you were a cook, a storeman, a gunner, a field engineer, etc you probably missed out – until years later. Voters elected to send these young men to Vietnam and significant numbers of them were killed and then voters changed their minds and blamed the troops – the… Read more »
pedant
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Steve777 @ 1123: Bit tough to blame Rupert Brooke for attitudes which were very widespread at the time he was killed. Siegfried Sassoon was another whose early war poems had celebratory elements, but he changed his views rapidly: “You smug faced crowds with kindling eye, who cheer when soldier lads march by; slink home and pray you’ll never know the hell where youth and laughter go.”

kezza2
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[Rossmore Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 10:51 pm | PERMALINK kezza no, I dont find that excerpt supremacist at all, but the moving words of a melancholic young man contemplating his death. Certainly there’s some patriotism in there, but nothing wrong with that.] Nothing wrong with that, eh? What if a Greek had died on that spot. Would the soil be richer for a Greek being laid there? Or richer because an Englishman lay there? That’s the conceit I’m talking about. A racist conceit. That an Englishman will enrich Greek soil, merely by decomposing there. Rupert Brooke thought his… Read more »
Steve777
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Re 1186: the PM was someone referred to in recent pages here as the ‘Silver Bodgie’. Too bad he can’t come out of retirement.

bemused
Guest
kezza2@1124 dave But I assume the Korean War Battalions got welcome home parades as did the Vietnam Battalions – something which is often overlooked. Others not in the main battalion formations were the ones overlooked. I don’t recall the welcome home ticker tape parades for the Viet Vets. All I remember is the scorn from the public, and the anger and bitterness of the conscriptees, not to mention the psychiatric problems. Perhaps the ones I saw, the ones I remember, were the ones who came back alive, but weren’t in the main batallion. I still see the anger today, from… Read more »
dave
Guest

[ But then again Rupert Brooke was only 27 years of age, full of the conceit of youth. After all he’d only seen ‘war’ for 6 months, most of which was travelling by sea.]

I have just finished Niall Ferguson’s, “The War of the World” and he refers to Brooke as being regarded as the “most handsome man in Britain” at the time.

But he died at sea, without seeing active service, from blood poisoning as the result of an infected mosquito bite on his way to Gallipoli.

bemused
Guest

Steve777@1122

The Vietnam welcome home parade was eventually held in 1986, 13 years after the last troops came home.

Oh… remind me, which party was in government then?

Rossmore
Guest

kezza no, I dont find that excerpt supremacist at all, but the moving words of a melancholic young man contemplating his death. Certainly there’s some patriotism in there, but nothing wrong with that.

kezza2
Guest

dave
[But I assume the Korean War Battalions got welcome home parades as did the Vietnam Battalions – something which is often overlooked. Others not in the main battalion formations were the ones overlooked.]

I don’t recall the welcome home ticker tape parades for the Viet Vets. All I remember is the scorn from the public, and the anger and bitterness of the conscriptees, not to mention the psychiatric problems.

Perhaps the ones I saw, the ones I remember, were the ones who came back alive, but weren’t in the main batallion.

I still see the anger today, from the Viet Vets.

Steve777
Guest

I always thought Rupert Brooke was a bit of an idiot. Had he lived to see the Great War through, then saw the 20’s, the Great Depression, Great War 2 then the Cold War with its threat of nuclear annihilation (he would have been 74 at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis), I’m sure that there would have been a good chance that he would have come to a less romantic view of war.

Steve777
Guest

The Vietnam welcome home parade was eventually held in 1986, 13 years after the last troops came home.

kezza2
Guest
[IF I should die, think only this of me; That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware, Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam, A body of England’s breathing English air, Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.] A bit supremacist, don’t ya think? But then again Rupert Brooke was only 27 years of age, full of the conceit of youth. After all he’d only seen ‘war’ for 6 months, most… Read more »
dave
Guest

Pludger = Bludger

dave
Guest
[ Or was the policy brought about because of the outrage against the Vietnam War? ] No. Different time frames. In the early stages of the Vietnam War (like many others including WW1) the war had public support – Successive tory Governments got elected right though the 60’s etc. [ what happened to the careerist Korean war soldiers? Were they treated like the Viet Vets? ] Korean War was referred to as the “Forgotton War” our dead are probably buried in Korean as far as I know. Now deceased Pludger, Judith Barnes’ husband was I believe a soldier in 3RAR… Read more »
Diogenes
Guest

OC

IF I should die, think only this of me;
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England.

https://www.philosophyfootball.com/view_item.php?pid=553

kezza2
Guest
dave [be buried at the closest Commonwealth War Cemetery – Malaysia in the case of Vietnam. When the Army/ Government sort to apply this to earky KIA in Vietnam there was an outcry and a Sydney businessman paid to bring several KIA home at his expenses. Then the first National Serviceman was KIA in Vietnam and his family demanded he be brought home. The policy was permanently changed when a VC was posthumously awarded and the serviceman in question was brought home for burial.] Or was the policy brought about because of the outrage against the Vietnam War? And the… Read more »
kezza2
Guest
[confessions Posted Saturday, August 2, 2014 at 9:46 pm | PERMALINK Dee: My property is surrounded by very (and I mean VERY) wealthy landowners who have used their influence to lean on the state govt to so far stop a dam being built in our valley which would’ve wiped out neighbouring farms, including several wineries; a direct road link to the main road into town, which would’ve seen several hobby farms flattened in the resulting roadworks; the town’s first traffic light intersection; and more recently a bid by Woollies to establish its presence here, the first by a major retail… Read more »
zoidlord
Guest

@BB/1113

Perhaps in Abbott’s case 3rd Army would be one his 3rd time lucky?

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