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Topic: Edward Glaeser
Does housing supply impact on inequality?

Does housing supply impact on inequality?

The supply and price of new housing affects affordability and is implicated in growing inequality. Debate about planning issues like city centre towers needs to take account of this wider context

Food: why aren’t our cities taking it to the streets?

Food: why aren’t our cities taking it to the streets?

Street food enhances the quality of city living but "rent seeking" by existing traders means Australian cities are streets behind in offering the exciting diversity of choices available elsewhere

Can US sun belt cities teach us something?

Can US sun belt cities teach us something?

Slate columnist Matt Yglesias posted an important article yesterday, In defence of the sun belt, that should be required reading for all politicians and policy-makers who’re interested in making Australian cities better. It reinforces how important it is to find ways to increase the supply of housing within our cities, especially in sought-after established areas. […]

Can activity centres supply enough housing?

Can activity centres supply enough housing?

Melbourne 2030 envisaged growth of high density housing and office employment within established suburbs would be located in activity centres, especially those with a rail station. In fact it specified that 41% of all dwellings should be constructed in activity centres over the period 2001-30 (with 31% in Growth Areas and the rest dispersed in […]

What can be learned from the English riots?

What can be learned from the English riots?

A lot of the commentary published in the wake of the English riots earlier this month marvelled at the wide range of views on the underlying causes. But few had much of substance to say themselves that might enhance broader understanding of the fundamental causes of the riots. I’ve come across three sources that I […]

What causes urban riots?

What causes urban riots?

British leftie, Brendan O’Neill, takes an unsympathetic view of the UK rioters in this article, London’s burning: a mob made by the welfare state. He dismisses popular explanations like racism, characterising the rioters as “welfare-state mobs” who are destroying their own communities. Painting these riots as some kind of action replay of historic political streetfights […]

Must it be bright lights, big (dangerous) city?

Must it be bright lights, big (dangerous) city?

This article in The Sunday Age reminds us that, for all its virtues, there’s a dark side to density. In Melbourne’s CBD, it include drunks urinating in doorways, assaults, noise and rubbish dropped heedlessly anywhere. Physical proximity has driven human progress for millennia, driving trade and exchange. But it also brought severe problems, like the […]

Is commuting (very) bad for you?

Is commuting (very) bad for you?

Let me say from the outset that I’ve long been sceptical about some of the methods used by Richard Florida, celebrated author of The Rise of the Creative Class. And I’m not the only one – this review of his book by Edward Glaeser is written with a velvet glove but packs an iron fist. […]

Do firms want to be in suburban centres?

Do firms want to be in suburban centres?

We know that most jobs in Melbourne are now in the suburbs. There’s also an increasing understanding that large metropolitan areas are now generally polycentric rather than monocentric in form i.e. there are significant activity centres outside the CBD with large numbers of jobs. The strategic planning update to Melbourne 2030, Melbourne @ 5 Million, released in […]