Scroll to top
Topic: Melbourne
A worker disinfects a rail carriage in China (via Business Insider; Credit: AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

How will the pandemic impact public transport?

Public transport is likely to take a post-lockdown hit from the pandemic and will have to adapt; but it will remain critical to the functioning of Australia's cities

Yet again politicians reach for the High Speed Rail elixir - this time as a prescription for national economic recovery from the pandemic. But it's snake oil

Is High Speed Rail the economic game-changer we need now?

Yet again politicians reach for the High Speed Rail elixir - this time as a prescription for national economic recovery from the pandemic. But it's snake oil

The only surprising aspect of the Victorian government’s decision to terminate Melbourne Bike Share is that it took so long

Is ending Melbourne Bike Share the right decision?

The only surprising aspect of the Victorian government’s decision to terminate Melbourne Bike Share is that it took so long

Fringe suburbs have historically always had fewer jobs than workers. What policy makers should focus on is providing good transport links to the more central parts of the city where most of the employers want to be

Is labelling the outer suburbs as ‘job deserts’ helpful?

Fringe suburbs have historically always had fewer jobs than workers. What policy makers should focus on is providing good transport links to the more central parts of the city where most of the employers want to be

It's a popular idea, but the revenue foregone from abolishing fares in a city like Melbourne would have a bigger impact if it were instead spent on making public transport more competitive with driving

Should public transport fares be abolished?

It's a popular idea, but the revenue foregone from abolishing fares in a city like Melbourne would have a bigger impact if it were instead spent on making public transport more competitive with driving

Federal Labor's promise to contribute $10 billion toward the cost of the $50 billion Melbourne suburban rail loop shows it's prepared to see a generation or two of infrastructure funding pissed away if it offers a political advantage

Should Shorten fund Melbourne’s suburban rail loop?

Federal Labor's promise to contribute $10 billion toward the cost of the $50 billion Melbourne suburban rail loop shows it's prepared to see a generation or two of infrastructure funding pissed away if it offers a political advantage

Very few motorists are actively hostile toward cyclists, but many more don't see them as legitimate or equal road users. There's a role for government in helping to change negative attitudes

Why do (some) motorists think cyclists don’t have a right to the roads?

Very few motorists are actively hostile toward cyclists, but many more don't see them as legitimate or equal road users. There's a role for government in helping to change negative attitudes

It'll probably make sense one day, but the promised $50 billion Melbourne suburban rail loop is the wrong project at this time. There are much higher priorities. The Andrews government should be helped to back away from this careless and cynical commitment

Suburban rail loop – how can this mistake be prevented?

It'll probably make sense one day, but the promised $50 billion Melbourne suburban rail loop is the wrong project at this time. There are much higher priorities. The Andrews government should be helped to back away from this careless and cynical commitment

Although there’s never been a strong tradition of cycling in Australia's capitals like there is in many European cities, the availability of battery powered bicycles and scooters is potentially a game-changer

Could powered two-wheelers be a game-changer for urban travel?

Although there’s never been a strong tradition of cycling in Australia's capitals like there is in many European cities, the availability of battery powered bicycles and scooters is potentially a game-changer

For the last 14 years car travel in Melbourne grew slower than both population and public transport travel, but it's still increasing in absolute terms

Is growth in driving really outstripping surging population?

For the last 14 years car travel in Melbourne grew slower than both population and public transport travel, but it's still increasing in absolute terms